Design Photography

Ethereal Photographs Capture Mono Giraud's Sculptural Garments Formed with Organic Materials

October 9, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Mono Giraud, shared with permission

Through dreamy photographs, multi-disciplinary artist Mono Giraud accentuates the feathered fronds of wheat stalks and paper’s smooth curves. Based in the Palermo neighborhood of Buenos Aires, Giraud consistently strives for simplicity and a focus on humble items in her practice that spans design, photography, and fine art. “I’m interested in the conjunction of energy between objects and people, like in a dance,” she shares with Colossal.

Evoking sprawling sculptures, Giraud’s garments are often neutral-toned to maintain the integrity of the original material. Dresses flow down into pools of fabric that then form wrinkly backdrops, spools of twine are arranged to mimic a sash and headdress, and a woven basket pocked with straw perches on a subject’s head.

Giraud manages an atelier and shop in the Argentinian capital, where she sells many of the goods used in her photographs. Despite working across mediums, she describes her practice as cohesive and as a search “to express my personal views and emotions of the soul.” The artist expands on the idea:

My work is about living the process. And this process has to be healthy, the energy is renewed instead of running out… and simplicity must be felt in each step. I go across the process to finally get to discovery. The travel is about feeling, touching, smelling, breathing, and crossing boundaries. I focus on the journey more than to reach a goal or arrive (at) a destination.

Explore more of the elegant objects and garments highlighted in Giraud’s photography on her site and Instagram.

 

 

 



Animation Music

Who Dat: A Suave Pigeon Struts Down the Sidewalk and Shows Off its Groove Thang in a New Music Video

October 8, 2020

Grace Ebert

The swaggering pigeon in Emmit Fenn’s new music video might upend the notion that peacocks are the proudest avians. Animated and directed by Patrick Jean, “Who Dat” opens on a quiet street corner before zooming in on the lone bird. As the bass drops, the pigeon begins a subtle strut down the street while it grooves to the beat. Soon, the bird reveals in its dancing skills after a shake of its tail feather. To see more of the Los Angeles-based director’s humorous animations, head to Vimeo.

 

 

 



Design

Lively Interventions by 100 Architects Transform Urban Spaces into Vibrant Playgrounds

October 8, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Big Bang” in Pingjiaqiao Road 36, Pudong, Shanghai. All images © 100 Architects, shared with permission

Walk around Shanghai or Dubai, and you might stumble upon a bright, geometric playground amongst the concrete. The design studio 100 Architects installs bold interventions that transform typical urban spaces into colorful playgrounds. Each public structure, which boasts entertainment for both kids and adults, is conceptualized around a theme, whether a massive shower complete with ground-level waves or an illuminated castle with inner tunnels. Splashes of color, playground equipment like swings and slides, and towering structures frame the areas, while some spaces, like the “Sea Horse,” sprinkle water from a central spot.

100 Architects recently partnered with urban planning group Playgones to collaborate on a range of interventions throughout Europe in upcoming months, which you can follow on Instagram. (via Journal du Design)

 

“Creek Play” in Dubai Creek Harbor, Dubai, UAE

“Hang Out” in Pingjiaqiao Road 36, Pudong, Shanghai, China

“Paint Drop” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“Paint Drop” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“Seahorse” in Pingjiaqiao Road 36, Chongqing, China

“The Shower” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“The Shower” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“The Shower” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“Secret Garden”

“Secret Garden”

 

 



History Photography

A Colorized Snowball Fight from 1896 Shows Not Much Has Changed in the Art of Winter Warfare

October 8, 2020

Grace Ebert

A short clip, originally captured by Louis Lumière in 1896, documents a rowdy snowball fight on the streets of Lyon, France. Thanks to Saint-Petersburg, Russia-based Dmitriy Badin, who used a combination of the open-source software DeOldify and his own specially-designed algorithms to upscale and colorize the historic footage, the video of the winter pastime is incredibly clear, revealing facial features and details on garments.

Badin applied a similar method—which involves a lengthy process of removing duplicate frames, adjusting brightness and contrast, and manually correcting color—to clips from cities around the world, many of which you can find on YouTube. You also might enjoy this flying train ride through a German village in 1902. (via Twisted Sifter)

Update: A previous version of this article incorrectly cited Barcelona-based Joaquim Campa as the creator of the colorized footage.

 

 

 



Art

Using Shattered Ceramics, Artist Bouke de Vries Revitalizes Found Porcelain in New Sculptures

October 7, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Bouke de Vries, shared with permission

Bouke de Vries (previously) refers to some of his porcelain sculptures as “three-dimensional still lifes.” The artist, who was born in the Netherlands and now lives in London, creates sprawling assemblages that resemble a classic bowl of fruit or table setting frequently found in Dutch art. “I compose these pieces as, after the painter has finished with them, the ceramics get broken and decayed, and I breathe new life into them. The butterfly in still life is a symbol for the resurrection in (the) way I see what I do through my work,” he tells Colossal. In de Vries’s works, though, the seemingly mundane scenes are fractured with bursting ceramics, encroaching insects, and decaying fruit.

The artist began working with porcelain as a restorer for 15 years before embarking on his own practice, which begins with a search for broken pottery and glass shards. He never breaks an undamaged piece but rather revitalizes those that are damaged already by creating new figures that celebrate the beauty of their previous forms. With a penchant for Kintsugi, he often utilizes gold lacquer to highlight the repaired cracks.

Alongside sculptural still lifes, the figure of Guan Yin, the Buddhist goddess of compassion, mercy, and kindness, recurs in de Vries’s work. Often surrounded by cracked shards and recomposed garments, she conveys an ability for understanding and repair.

In recent weeks, de Vries has been working on commissions and new pieces, in addition to a large-scale project that spans the entrance of one of Sotheby’s Bond Street galleries, which you can see on Instagram. To find out more about the artist’s vision behind that piece, watch this interview. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

 

 

 



Dance Music

A New One-Take BBC Ad Brilliantly Interprets the Feelings of Music Through Clever Choreography

October 7, 2020

Grace Ebert

It’s well-documented that music moves us, and an advertisement for BBC Sounds takes that research literally. A project of Rogue Films, the one-minute clip opens on a woman riding a city bus before swooping into a responsively choreographed dance enhanced by visual effects. Each subject, including an unassuming dog, sways and spins to the diverse array of sounds pumping through their headphones or the speakers in a coffee shop. Two women twist in double-helix, a figure floats calmly mid-air, and another stares at hovering objects while she listens to astronauts in space.

Based in London, the production company says on Twitter that the socially distant advertisement was shot in one take on a cordoned-off city street.