Design

A Minimal Window-Laden Facade in Paris Sprouts a Luxuriant Vertical Garden

May 10, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Yann Monel and Michael Denancé, courtesy of Triptyque Architecture

Hidden under a lush canopy of vegetation on Paris’s Left Bank is a minimal, mesh-like structure housing a healthcare center, restaurant, and hotel. The project of the French-Brazilian Triptyque Architecture in collaboration with the Coloco landscaping studio, “Villa M” is a mixed-used building cloaked in a vertical garden that ascends from the sidewalk to the rooftop bar. Foliage and vines trail down from the hotel room balconies and sprout from planters embedded in the facade, establishing a verdant environment spanning 8,000 square meters in the middle of the busy Montparnasse.

In addition to the urban ecosystem, dozens of windows allow for natural lighting throughout the space. “We have explored all of the available surfaces to potentialise the greenery and to avoid energy and carbon waste,” architect Guillaume Sibaud told Plain Magazine. “Villa M” was also named the Building of the Year 2022 by ArchDaily.

For more of Triptyque’s environmentally conscious designs, visit its site and Instagram.

 

 

 



Art

Bizarre Installations and Figurative Sculptures by Mark Jenkins Upend Notions of Reality

May 9, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Mark Jenkins, shared with permission

“I think my art is at its best when it’s subconscious-driven,” says Mark Jenkins. Veering from the witty and absurd to the disorienting and bizarre, Jenkins’ body of work confronts perceptions of reality through the surreal: a life-sized figure climbs a fire escape upside down, limp legs hang from a dumpster, and toast springs up from a sewer grate.

Whether installed in alleys and urban areas or within the stark, white space of a gallery, Jenkins’ sculptures are theatrical and logic-defying, and each piece mimics “life to the point where it becomes real, to me,” he shares. “Creating an alternative reality has been the solution for my mental health. I find reality a bit depressing with death and all, politics, war, celebrities, etc., and that all the stars are so far away we can never really get to know the universe.”

Jenkins is currently working in Los Angeles and soon headed to Le Havre, France, for his next project. You can follow his practice and explore an expansive archive of his sculptures on his site and Instagram.

 

 

 



.ART Domains Celebrates Five Years of Building Digital Identities

May 9, 2022

.ART

Multidisciplinary artist Shantell Martin. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Since launching in 2017, .ART has become a popular extension for creatives and is among the top five fastest-growing domains—all through organic growth and remarkably high renewal rates. A website on .ART can be anything: an online portfolio, a point of entry for all of your social media accounts, a revenue-generating marketplace, or even a cool name for your NFT. Its community of more than 200,000 users includes creative organizations, individual personalities, and industry giants like the Louvre, Marina Abramovic Institute, LACMA, ICA London, Amazon, Bank of America, Mercedes, Pixar, Kickstarter, Vivienne Westwood, and many others.

.ART users come to the platform to make an impact with their domain name, enhance their online presence, and be easily discovered. For example, Shantell Martin (shantellmartin.art) has been with .ART from the beginning. Since then, she’s co-created a live performance with Kendrick Lamar, choreographed her first ballet at Boston Ballet, collaborated with the Whitney Museum Shop, taken over all the screens in the Oculus at the World Trade Center, and more. Reflecting on the development of digital space over the past few years, Martin says, “People have a more digital presence than five years ago. The definition of ‘being online’ has changed immensely, and now this encompasses AR, Discord, NFTs, etc. It’s so many more things than it used to be.”

 

Shantell Martin’s takeover of the Oculus’s screens in the World Trade Center. Photo by Timothy Schenck

bitforms gallery (bitforms.art), based in New York and San Francisco, represents established, mid-career, and emerging artists who are critically engaged with new technologies. Spanning the history of media art through its current developments, the gallery’s program offers an incisive perspective on digital, internet, time-based, and new media art forms. “I’ve been telling my artists to get .ART because .com is related to commerce and business, and .ART immediately puts you in a place that people understand you’re in the art platform,” says Steven Sacks, bitforms gallery founder.

To date, the Public Benefit Corporation Kickstarter Arts (kickstarter.art) has raised more than $290 million for more than 76,000 artistic projects across the art, dance, photography, and theatre categories. The team behind Kickstarter comments that “.ART allows us to speak directly to the arts community in a more targeted and focused way.”

Jobs.art attracts employers from across the globe with the aim of connecting applicants to museums, galleries, curators, and other art handling positions. Founder Clynton Lowry says: “Essentially, .ART has provided half the marketing for us. It’s like the readymade, but for online identities.”

Created in 1956, Brafa Art Fair (brafa.art) is one of the world’s oldest art fairs. Bruno Nelis, Brafa’s former PR & Communication Director, explains: “Before we had a brafa.be website on a Belgian domain, and we felt that it was important to get access to a community that was global.”

To explore domain options, visit get.art or check with your registrar. Use promo code ARTBDAY to get 55% OFF on all domains.

This offer is valid through May 31, 2022.

 

By Metalman (metalman.art), courtesy of the artist

 

 



Art Craft

Wooden Characters with Lanky, Curved Bodies by Tach Pollard Are Rooted in Myth and Lore

May 9, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images courtesy of Tach Pollard

Oxford-based artist Tach Pollard (previously) allows the sinuous shapes of hawthorn or oak branches to guide the forms of his fantastical figures. The lanky creatures stand on long limbs with hunched shoulders and bowed backs, features determined by the original curve of the wood. Based on legends like the Norse Eddas, The Mabinogion, and the Icelandic Sagas, the sculptures are mysterious and minimal—Pollard tends to leave the natural color and grain of the material intact for their faces and burns the remainder to obtain the deep, black char that envelops their figures. You can shop available pieces on Etsy, and follow the artist on Instagram to stay up-to-date on future releases.

 

 

 



Science

Scientists Uncover a New Deep-Sea Crown Jellyfish Species with Dozens of Coiled Tentacles

May 6, 2022

Grace Ebert

Curled tentacles, soft spikes, and an unusually large, translucent bell distinguish a newly discovered species of jellyfish. The uncommon A. Reynoldsi became the subject of study for scientists at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (previously) earlier this year when one of the deep-sea creatures was documented floating through the midnight zone. “Fifteen years ago, MBARI researchers spotted a large jelly that looked like Atolla but lacked the telltale trailing tentacle, and their curiosity was piqued,” MBARI says.

Bigger than most in the Atolla genus, this particular specimen measured 5.1 inches across with about 30 to 40 small, coiled tentacles that differ from other species’ singular, long appendages. The institute has only recorded about ten sightings of the A. Reynoldsi since 2006, a discovery researchers say “remind(s) us that we still know so little about the ocean, the largest living space on Earth.” (via PetaPixel)

 

 

 



Art

A Chromatic Installation by Felipe Pantone Turns a Public Walkway into an Architectural Kaleidoscope

May 6, 2022

Grace Ebert

Photo by Matt Alexander. All images © Felipe Pantone, shared with permission

Argentinian-Spanish artist Felipe Pantone (previously) magnifies the prismatic principles that ground his Subtractive Variability series to a phenomenal scale in the newly installed “Quick Tide.” Whether working in kinetic sculpture or large-scale murals, Pantone investigates the vast realm of color theory and its bottomless potential, in this instance transforming the cyan, magenta, and yellow model into a dynamic display. “The idea of creating a system in which I can create endless color combinations within the visible color spectrum by simply rotating or displacing the same image over and over (in C, M, Y)… the results are always random, unexpected, yet always interesting for me,” Pantone tells Colossal.

The site-specific “Quick Tide” wraps the upper and lower levels of an elevated walkway in London’s Greenwich Peninsula with a vibrant collision of light and pigment—see Liz West’s transformation of the same outdoor space previously on Colossal. Angled blocks hold radial gradients to “make obvious where the different colors overlap and how different hues appear. These details are usually easy to find as chromatic aberrations in prints by looking under the magnifier,” the artist shares, noting that the combinations shift in appearance depending on the time of day and position of the viewer.

Pantone will soon open a solo show titled Manipulable at Tokyo’s Gallery COMMON that invites visitors to interact with the works, and you can follow updates on that exhibition and new works on Instagram.

 

Photo by Charles Emerson

Photo by Charles Emerson

Photo by Charles Emerson

Photo by Matt Alexander

Photo by Charles Emerson

Photo by Matt Alexander

Photo by Matt Alexander

 

 

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