Art Craft Food

Embroidered Snacks and Mass-Produced Food by Alicja Kozlowska Chew On Consumerist Culture

January 18, 2023

Grace Ebert

A photo of an embroidered Oreo package with cookies

All images © Alicja Kozłowska, shared with permission

In the ongoing series Embroidered OrdinariesAlicja Kozlowska translates the mass production of Pop Art into tightly stitched sculptures. The Polish artist sews packages of Oreos and half-eaten cookies, rusted cans with peeled-back tops, and 12-packs of Coca-Cola at full scale, recreating the recognizable logos and designs of ubiquitous snacks and goods. Each work begins with a felted structure the artist covers in myriad knots and stitches, which produces textured iterations that reflect on consumerism and the lasting impacts of over-consumption.

Find more of the Embroidered Ordinaries sculptures on Kozlowska’s site, and keep an eye on her Instagram for upcoming additions.

 

A photo of an embroidered fish can

A photo of an embroidered coca cola pack

A photo of an embroidered lays bag

A photo of an embroidered banana peel

A photo of an embroidered Campbell's tomato soup can

A photo of an embroidered Lipton can

Four photo of embroidered snacks

A photo of an embroidered Lays bag

A photo of embroidered snacks

 

 

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Art

Through Whimsical Wooden Sculptures, Christian Verginer Explores Childhood Curiosity and Connection

January 17, 2023

Grace Ebert

A photo of a wood sculpture of a child with treebranch pigtails

Detail of “The Tree in Me.” All images © Christian Verginer, shared with permission

From large pieces of basswood, artist Christian Verginer carves figurative sculptures that meld the play and wonder of adolescence with the vitality of the natural world. Leafy branches grow like pigtails, a bird perches on the zipper of a hoodie, and two young boys sit on ladders that lead to treetops and clouds. Textured by small gouges, the works contrast realistic renditions of children with fantastical elements, the latter of which the artist tends to paint in a single color like vibrant green, slate gray, or beige.

Verginer is broadly interested in the ways humans and nature intersect, which he conveys through a sense of curiosity and embodied connection between the two. Some sculptures foster such relationships through three-dimensional forms, like the deceased bird the girl pinches between her fingers as in “Different Stories.” Others reference shadows, including “Two Stories” and “Different Time,” which overlay silhouettes of trees and flowers atop the young figures’ bodies.

Based in the Alto Adige region of northern Italy, Verginer works in a studio he shares with his father Willy Verginer (previously) and brother Matt Verginer. Each maintains a distinct practice, although the artist shares that the environment is well-suited for feedback and critique. All three will show together this May at a gallery in Nürnberg, although you can see Christian Verginer’s work this month with Kirk Gallery at Art Herning. Otherwise, find more of his sculptures on his site and Instagram.

 

Two photos of a wood sculpture of a child with a green bird

“Too far too close” (2023), plinth, limewood, iron wire, and acrylic, 140 x 40 centimeters

A photo of a wood sculpture of a child with treebranch pigtails

“The Tree in Me”

Two photos of two wood sculptures of children sitting atop tall ladders

A photo of a wood sculpture of a child sitting on a ladder with a scissors and leaves

Two photos of a wood sculpture of a child holding a dead bird

“Different stories” (2021), limewood and acrylics, 135 x 41 centimeters

A photo of a wood sculpture of a child with his leg in a bucket and a plant shadow

“Different times” (2022)

Two photos of a wood sculpture of a child with a scissors and bouquet

A photo of a wood sculpture of a child stepping in a planter wiht a tree shadow

“Two stories” (2022), limewood and aluminum acrylics, 68 centimeters

 

 



Art

Leaves, Insects, and Human Anatomy Converge in Delicate Pencil Drawings by Amahi Mori

January 17, 2023

Grace Ebert

A drawing of a leaf and butterfly hybrid creature

“Papilio ulysses,” pencil, colored pencil, and watercolor on paper, 22.7 x 22.7 centimeters. All images © Amahi Mori, shared with permission

Through veins and hybridized beings, Japanese artist Amahi Mori connects life across the plant and animal kingdoms. Various circulatory systems blend together in seamless compositions with leafy greens emerging from a blue morpho or cloaking an elongated human hand. Rendered in graphite, colored pencil, and watercolor, Amahi’s delicate works center on the vibrancy of life conveyed through brilliantly patterned wings and supple leaves. Many of the drawings are also tinged with the otherworldly and surreal, particularly as human skin stretches to account for a growing stem.

Amahi has a solo exhibition slated for this May at Ginza Getsukoso Gallery. Until then, find an archive of her fused creatures on her site and Instagram.

 

A graphite drawing of a leaf growing from a human hand

“Daydream,” pencil and acrylic gouache on paper, 33.3 x 24.2 centimeters

A drawing of a leaf and butterfly hybrid creature

“Papilio xuthus,” pencil, colored pencil, and watercolor on paper, 15.8 x 22.7 centimeters

A drawing of a butterfly and leaf hybrid creature

“Sasakia charonda,” pencil, colored pencil, watercolor, and acrylic gouache on paper, 22 x 27.3 centimeters

A drawing of a leaf growing from a hand

“Metamorphose into leaf veins,” pencil, watercolor, and acrylic gouache on paper, 22 x 27.3 centimeters

A drawing of a leaf and butterfly hybrid

“Papilio machaon,” pencil and watercolor on paper, 14 x 18 centimeters

A drawing of a leaf growing from a hand

“Shining,” pencil, watercolor, and acrylic gouache on paper, 27.3 x 22 centimeters

A drawing of human arm with a plant growing from a wrist

“Hello, see you,” pencil, watercolor, and acrylic gouache on paper, 27.3 x 22 centimeters

 

 



New York City Ballet Art Series Presents DRIFT’s ‘Shylight’

January 17, 2023

New York City Ballet

A photo of light sculpture

DRIFT’s “Shylight” (development 2006–2014), aluminum, polished stainless steel, silk, LEDs, robotics. On view at three special NYC Ballet Art Series performances in January and February 2023. All photos by Ossip van Duivenbode

Dutch artists Lonneke Gordijn and Ralph Nauta are DRIFT, a multidisciplinary group that creates experiential sculptures, installations, and performances, uniting audiences with moments that inspire a reconnection to our planet.

For New York City Ballet’s Art Series 2023, the duo curates their “Shylight” installation into a site-specific, performative sculpture, merging the movement of industrial motors with silk, multi-layered chalice-like structures. The pieces move with the grace of a dancer into a natural choreography, manifesting live emotion and personality in an inanimate material. With custom choreography supervised by the artists themselves, the works’ unpredictable, natural-looking movements become an object that feels alive as it descends to blossom in all its glorious beauty, before closing and retreating upward again.

The installation will be on view at three special NYC Ballet Art Series performances on January 27, February 3, and February 9, and all tickets are $38.

Performances are on sale now at nycballet.com/artseries.

 

A photo of light sculpture

A photo of light sculpture

A photo of light sculpture

 

 



Art

Evoking Organic Growth, Toru Kurokawa’s Ceramic Sculptures Stretch and Swell into Abstract Forms

January 17, 2023

Grace Ebert

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Visceral vision.” All images © Toru Kurokawa, shared with permission

The natural growth process, which begins with the replication of a single cell and eventually produces bodily systems and lifeforms, informs the practice of artist Toru Kurokawa (previously). Based in Kyoto, Kurokawa transforms amorphous hunks of clay into organic sculptures that bow and bend. The malleable material stretches to reveal pockets of negative space or to generate undulating edges, and once fired, the works appear to freeze those movements. “I would like to create a space that fuses the two things, existence and non-existence,” the artist tells Colossal. “I am conscious of that connection.” Glazed in textured, neutral tones, the resulting forms are abstract and biological, conveying the tension and strength of change.

Kurokawa is currently considering how mathematics and physics can influence the geometries of the works, and you can follow that progress on Instagram.

 

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Earth pot”

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Aggregate β”

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Holosroidea”

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Black garden”

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Threshold”

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Aire”

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Protocell J”

 

 



Art Craft

From Junk Drawers to Phone Books, Artist Bernie Kaminski Captures the Nostalgia of Banal Items Through Papier-Mâché

January 13, 2023

Grace Ebert

A photo of a paper mache junk drawer

All images © Bernie Kaminski, courtesy of Turn Gallery, shared with permission

A stack of worn phone books, a neatly folded button-up, and a junk drawer filled with receipts, batteries, and takeout remnants capture the playful nostalgia of Bernie Kaminski’s papier-mâché sculptures. The artist, who began working with the humble craft after his daughter brought home a seahorse she made in school, is driven largely by curiosity and a desire to explore the potential of the material, and he tends to recreate the objects he finds around his home. An orange dutch oven sits atop a shelving unit stocked with pantry items and cookbooks, for example, and books like Wilkie Collins’ The Woman in White and John Berger’s A Painter of Our Time find their place among other classic texts.

Kaminski gravitates toward authentic interpretations of generally banal items, although the subtle ripples and creases of the material remain visible. He generally coats a cardboard and tape base with the wet papier-mâché, before letting it dry and painting on logos, signatures, and other details. Imbued with a playful sense of nostalgia, the sculptures “look fake in a way that somehow reflects how I feel about the real thing,” the artist tells It’s Nice That.

Be sure to visit Kaminski’s Instagram for an archive of the lighthearted wares. (via Kottke)

 

A photo of paper mache phone books and a phone

A photo of a paper mache boombox

A photo of a paper mache t-shirt

A photo of a paper mache pantry

A photo of paper mache books

A photo of a paper mache button up

A detail photo of a paper mache junk drawer