Design History

Dazzle Camouflage Gives Warships an Unlikely Disguise

October 22, 2010

Christopher Jobson

I’ve been meaning to post this for a while ever since seeing it on Graphic Hug a while back but it kinda fell off the radar. Dazzle camouflage was a technique used during both WWI and WWII to obscure aspects war ships.

At first glance Dazzle seems unlikely camouflage, drawing attention to the ship rather than hiding it, but this technique was developed after the Allied Navies were unable to develop effective means to disguise ships in all weather.

Dazzle did not conceal the ship but made it difficult for the enemy to estimate its type, size, speed and heading. The idea was to disrupt the visual rangefinders used for naval artillery. Its purpose was confusion rather than concealment. An observer would find it difficult to know exactly whether the stern or the bow is in view; and it would be equally difficult to estimate whether the observed vessel is moving towards or away from the observer’s position.

RISD also has a super cool online gallery on the topic. Great stuff. On a related note, and from a different war, see also Quaker Guns. (via graphic hug)

 

 



Illustration

30 Wonder Women by Lucy Knisley

October 22, 2010

Christopher Jobson

An epic painting of 30 Wonder Women charging into battle by artist Lucy Knisley. Society6 now has high-resolution prints available online. (via beale)

 

 



Design

NY Store Kiosk Sources Everyday Treasures from Japan

October 22, 2010

Christopher Jobson

I stumbled onto Kiosk when doing research for the minimalist bottle openers post a few weeks ago. The folks who run this NY-based store trek far and wide to places like Sweden, Finland, or Hong Kong and pick up tons of funky stuff that you’ve probably never seen before. Some things are quirky, some utilitarian, others just decorative and fun. The spoils from their second journey to Japan went online last night.

 

 



Photography

Autumn Spectrum

October 22, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Sorry if you’ve seen this everywhere, but it needs to go here too. Photo by Mr. Dale on Flickr. (via this isn’t happiness)

 

 



Design

Work is Worship

October 22, 2010

Christopher Jobson

The reception desk at W+K Delhi. What would you spell with an extra 23,000 pencils? (via quips)

 

 



Design

Lois, a Cedar topped table with a frisky attitude

October 21, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Behold the world’s first minimalist steampunk table. The Lois is a one-of-a-kind table designed by Charles Waugh out of Boring, Oregon where apparently he makes stuff that’s anything but boring.