Photography

The Surreal, Infrared Photography of David Keochkerian

December 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

These infrared photographs taken by France-based photographer David Keochkerian look like bizarre, saturated landscapes created from a Dr. Seuss illustration. Seasons seem reversed, with white trees appearing in spring, and bushes are transformed into something that looks like fragile blades of bubble gum. You can see much more on Facebook, and Keochkerian tells me some images are avilable as limited edition prints if you contact him directly. If you liked this, also check out the work of Richard Mosse. (via gaks)

 

 



Art

The Balanced Rock Sculptures of Michael Grab Rely Solely on Gravity

December 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Land artist Michael Grab creates astonishing towers and orbs of balanced rocks using little more than patience and an astonishing sense of balance. Grab says the art of stone balancing has been practiced by various cultures around the world for centuries and that he personally finds the process of balancing to be therapeutic and meditative.

Over the past few years of practicing rock balance, simple curiosity has evolved into therapeutic ritual, ultimately nurturing meditative presence, mental well-being, and artistry of design. Alongside the art, setting rocks into balance has also become a way of showing appreciation, offering thanksgiving, and inducing meditation. Through manipulation of gravitational threads, the ancient stones become a poetic dance of form and energy, birth and death, perfection and imperfection.

Almost all of the works you see here were completed this fall in locations around Boulder, Colorado. You can see much more in his portfolio as well as several videos of him working over on YouTube.

 

 



Art

Pop Bubble Wrap While you Wait for Instant Anti-Stress

December 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

It’s the universally gratifying sensation felt by every man, woman, and child who has ever torn open a package to discover an object protected with bubble wrap: the satisfying pop caused from squeezing little plastic pockets of air (and WOE to the person responsible for inventing the new sheets of bubble wrap that are actually just one contiguous pocket of air and are completely un-poppable, you made my son cry, but I digress). In an attempt to help minimize the stress caused from the tedium of waiting for a late train, Italian street artist Biancoshock installed sheets of bubble wrap cut into squares labeled with the approximate amount of time it would take to pop them. Brilliant. (via rebel art)

 

 



Art

Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska

December 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

I’m really enjoying the use of structure and color by Poland-based watercolor artist Maja Wrońska who has captured some lovely scenes from Paris, Venice, Prague, and elsewhere. Catch more of her work over on DeviantArt and Behance. (via my darkened eyes)

 

 



Art

Five Hours of Plane Landings in 30 Seconds at San Diego International Airport

December 2, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Shot just outside the San Diego Internation Airport on Black Friday this remarkable time-lapse captures every landing over a five hour period from 10:30am through 3pm. The video is of course a composite, photographer and film professor Cy Kuckenbaker shot the individual planes against a clear blue sky and then used a process called chroma key (ie. green screen) to make the sky transparent and layer the planes on top a separate video of clouds.

Kuckenbaker tells PetaPixel he was inspired by Ho-Yeol Ryu’s famous composite image of airplanes taking off at Hannover Airport. See much more at PetaPixel.

Update: Kuckenbaker released a new video 90 airplanes taking off in 30 seconds.

 

 



Art Design

Birds on Twitter

November 29, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Latvian conceptual artist and creative director Voldemars Dudums created this insanely clever bird feeder using an old computer keyboard and some cubes of bacon fat. When the birds would fly down to snack their inadvertent key presses were fed to an api that parsed each little tap into a bonafide tweet on the @hungry_birds Twitter account (fyi, these particular feathered friends became political during the U.S. elections, so there’s that). The birds, mostly tomtits, would tweet roughly 100 times each day and could even be watched live over on Birds on Twitter. It even landed Dudums a people’s choice award for Guerrilla Innovation in Advertising. Unfortunately the project went offline in March of this year, as that’s when the cryptic avian tweets cease. I feel like a schmuck for being so late to the party on this, but reading through the archive of tweets is still pretty entertaining for random literary gems like “OOOMMMGGGGG” and “AIAIAIA”. (via izmia)