Art Design

Geometric Sandcastles by Calvin Seibert

November 26, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Sand castle artist Calvin Seibert manages to construct nearly impossible shapes from one of the world’s most delicate mediums. While Colossal has seen its fair share of art made with sand I’ve never seen anything so perfectly angular and geometric. See much more of his work over on Flickr. (via fasels suppe)

 

 



Photography

Incredible Timelapse Video of the Night Sky Recorded Using a Fisheye Lens

November 26, 2012

Christopher Jobson

French photographer Stephane Vetter captured this outstanding time-lapse of the night sky using a Sigma 8 mm fisheye lens, meaning that what you see in the video is a true representation of the entire visible sky. Titled Leonid and Zodiacal Light, the brief but jaw-dropping clip was shot November 17th of this year and includes a five-hour star trail and Vetter even takes time to label signifiant stars and other objects visible in the sky. Make sure you watch it full-screen.

 

 



Art Illustration

Portraits Drawn on Maps by Ed Fairburn

November 25, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Ink on a 1973 road map of Germany

Artist Ed Fairburn utilizes the chaotic patchwork of roads, trains, and rivers printed on maps as the framework for his large-scale portraits. Almost like a sculptor carving a subject from a block of stone, or a constellation highlighted in a clump of stars, Fairburn uses meticulous ink or pencil cross hatching to create portraits hidden amongst the topographical features. You can see much more of his work over on Facebook. (via artchipel)

Pencil on a Bartholomew map of Pembroke

Pencil on a Bartholomew map of Galloway

Ink on a ’30 Miles Around’ map of Bournemouth

Ink on a street map of Cambridge

 

 



Art

Scattered Crowd: Thousands of White Balloons Suspended by William Forsythe

November 23, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Since 2002 artist, dancer and choreographer William Forsythe has traveled with his audio/visual installation Scattered Crowd, created with thousands of suspended balloons in galleries, museums, banks and other architecturally significant spaces. Though the photos clearly do the work visual justice I think it’s hard to truly appreciate the full sensory experience without walking through the space itself and hearing the accompanying music by Ekkehard Ehlers, though the video gives you some idea. Forsythe refers to the work as being “an air-borne landscape of relationship, of distance, of humans and emptiness, of coalescence and decision”. The piece will next appear at Bockenheimer Depot in 2013. (via boingboing)

 

 



Art Photography

Cambodian Trees: Digitally Projected Deities and Sprits on the Streets of Cambodia

November 23, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Cambodian Trees is a digital projection work by French artist Clement Briend who traveled to Cambodia to photograph these sculptural representations of deities and spirits from Cambodian culture overlaid on trees in several urban areas. Of the series Briend says:

It’s a beautiful surprise when the projected spirits awaken and reveal themselves at night as though they are made of the towering trees themselves. The photographic light installations echo the spirituality of the few sprouts of nature in the predominantly urban landscapes. It is a visual imagining of the divine figures that inhabit the world, as seen through an environmentally aware spiritual eye.

Though I’m generally not a fan of digital projection, I really enjoy Briend’s utilization of tree branches to lend volume to the photographs of sculptures, in essence giving them life. To see several more images from this series, head over to his website. All images courtesy the artist. (via empty kingdom)

 

 



Art

Wake: A Walkway of Severed Purple Logs by Michael McGillis

November 21, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Huge mounds of firewood are a common site here in the midwest, but in the capable hands of Michigan artist Michael McGillis a row of logs becomes a unexpectedly beautiful sight. Titled Wake the piece was originally installed back in 2006 at the Franconia Sculpture Park in Shafer, Minnesota and consisted of a 95-foot long trench of cut trees painted purple in the middle as if to reveal a suprising new species of plant. A simple idea, wonderfully executed. (via my darkened eyes)