Animation

3D Editing Tools Manipulate Everyday Life in This Reality-Bending Video by Vladimir Tomin

July 26, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

Russian motion designer Vladimir Tomin recently went viral with his most recent, mind-blowing video reel titled Прогулка (Stroll). As the title suggests, the footage is a first-person view of a casual stroll, filled with a collection of reality-bending events. Tomin places the interface of his work tools in the real world, gaining virtual superpowers that allow him to bend street lamps, cause a wave of painted street markings, digitally move a slinky down a set of stairs, move or knock things over, and more.

“When you have an idea, you can’t wait to see how it is going to work, and if it is going to work,” he tells Colossal. “So you work towards it, and during the process there is stuff that you have to figure out, stuff that works easier than you planned, and stuff that is much harder than you anticipated. It’s a very fulfilling process that is fueled by curiosity.”

The inspiration for his animations comes from different sources, but in this case, he was particularly intrigued with the power of Instagram’s realtime AI filters. With everyday gadgets being so technically advanced and providing such possibilities to end users, his reel was made with the vision of what future technologies might allow. By borrowing elements from the generic motion graphic program interface, the video constructs an illusion of utilizing 3D workstation tools in real time, just as commonly as one might use Instagram filters.

The concept was realized using his actual video footage as the background, with all objects that are being manipulated being animated in full 3D, mostly using Adobe After Effects and Cinema 4D. “Sometimes the idea is above everything else, and even if you currently have no clue how to make it work – you will find a way,” he explains. “That sometimes is challenging and it feels great to finally win that fight. Probably not unlike beating some nasty level in a very hard game. Hard but satisfying.”

Tomin has actively worked for over a decade as a graphic illustrator and motion designer, and has an impressive list of awards and projects under his belt. His list of clients includes Bloomberg, Boeing, Coca-Cola, Google and Intel. Vladimir is also a big Nintendo fan, and really enjoys the current trends and novelties of that world. You can see more of his graphics and video-based work, including this animated Nintendo Switch, on Instagram. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 



Illustration

Creative Lego Constructions Bring Fantastical Moments to Life

July 25, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Imagine

Imagine

Creative constructions of Lego bricks spring to life in these advertising campaigns developed by Asawin Tejasakulsin, a senior art director at Ogilvy & Mather in Bangkok, Thailand. The two series, Imagine and Build the Future, amplify the childhood wonder central to the Lego brand, devising playful scenarios that successfully interact with reality. In Imagine, storybook animals come to life, while in Build the Future, children assemble the uniforms of their dream jobs, all using Lego bricks. You can see more work by Tejasakulsin on Behance.

Imagine

Imagine

Imagine

Imagine

Build the Future

Build the Future

Build the Future

Build the Future

Build the Future

Build the Future

 

 



Art

Carbon Copy: A Glitched Vintage Plymouth Stands on End in a Canadian Parking Lot

July 25, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Calgary-based artists Caitlind r.c. Brown and Wayne Garrett (previously) create large, public installations that invite people to engage in a shared experience. Their latest work cruised into Edmonton’s Brewery District late last month—a blue 1988 Plymouth Caravelle balanced perfectly on its front bumper and headlights. At first glance the car appears to have stuck a perfect vertical landing after a tragically wrong maneuver, but upon closer inspection one notices glitched segments that protrude from the vehicle’s body and front wheel.

These vehicular manipulations were formed from fiberglass to make the car look as if it had been hastily copied, thus the installation’s name, Carbon Copy. The title is also a comment on mass production and consumer culture, reminding passersby of the rate at which cars are marketed and produced, especially in the car-obsessed cultural of North America. The parking lot is a fitting environment for the 30-year-old vehicle, and makes its position all the more jarring when viewed.

Carbon Copy was commissioned by First Capital Realty and Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada’s Arts Program Initiative, facilitated by Zebra Public Art Management, and fabricated by F&D Scene Changes. At night, the car’s signal and tail lights illuminate, and a scanner bar strobes the surrounding parking lot every 20 seconds. You can take an in-depth look at the inspiration and instillation behind the public work on the vehicle’s blog. (via Edmonton Journal)

 

 



Amazing Science

Watch Amazonian Butterflies Take Sips of a Turtle’s Salty Tears

July 25, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Entomologist and adventurer Phil Torres hosts a popular YouTube Channel, The Jungle Diaries, where he shares insights and observations from his travels to remote areas around the world. Recently, a trip to the Peruvian Amazon afforded footage of eight different butterfly species alighting on turtles to drink their tears. The phenomenon occurs because the sodium in the tears is a vital part of the butterflies’ diet that’s not readily available in the foods they consume. The search for sodium is actually quite common in the wild, and is also sourced from jaguar feces and river mud, as Torres notes.

You can follow along with more of Torres’s discovery-filled travels on Instagram and Twitter. Also check out photographer Mark Cowan’s amazing snapshot of a caiman sporting a crown of tear-drinking butterflies from 2016. (via Lustik)

 

 

 



Design

An Inflated Steel Archway Provides a New Cultural Nexus on a Polish Island

July 24, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Last year Polish designer Oskar Zieta unveiled the NAWA pavilion, an inflated steel passageway intended to bring cultural activity back to Wrocław’s island of Daliowa. This structure’s reflective, bloated surface makes it look like a weightless mylar balloon despite the fact that is constructed from 35 polished metal arches. Using a technology which Zieta calls FiDU, he inflates the metal by pumping air into the cavity between the arches’ steel sheets which produces a form that is larger and more organically shaped.

Zieta first used this process for the Plopp stool for the design brand Hay in 2008, and has continued to develop his technique on more advanced projects. Durability tests on this particular piece proved that a stool weighing just under ten pounds could withhold a load of approximately 2.6 tons, equivalent to two adult elephants. He hopes to implement the FiDU technique into much larger architectural projects, which would provide structures with a greater durability, even in ultralight constructions.

The reflective NAWA sculpture will remain on the island as a permanent installation as a part of revitalization effort for the previously neglected area. “Today, many people cannot imagine this place without NAWA, which has become part of the surroundings and a point on the map of many tourists from the country and the whole world,” the artist explained. You can learn more about the history of the design, and view more images of the inflated gateway, on Zieta’s website. (via Dezeen)

 

 



Craft

Uncanny Portraits of Cats Crafted with Realistic Glass Eyes and Felted Wool

July 24, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese artist Wakuneco makes incredibly realistic portraits of feline heads, handcrafting the three-dimensional creations from felted wool. Making such lifelike cat faces has provided Wakuneco with quite the following on Youtube, where she posts how-to videos that lead her audience through the process of attaching the cats’ fur to perfectly securing each subject’s tiny whiskers. She pulls inspiration from images of real cats for her unique pieces, which range in breed, color, and size. She sells her sculpture objects on Yahoo! Auctions, but currently only ships within Japan. You can see more of Wakuneco’s pieces on Instagram and Twitter. (via My Modern Met and Laughing Squid)

 

 



Art

Masses of Wooden Chairs Pour From Old Villas by Karin van der Molen

July 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Flux" (2015), Domaine du Rayol, Rayol du Canadel, France, all images via Karin van der Molen

“Flux” (2015), Domaine du Rayol, Rayol du Canadel, France, all images via Karin van der Molen

Site-specific installation artist Karin van der Molen creates connections between the natural and man-made through chair-based works that flow from the windows of aging villas. In her 2015 piece Flux the Dutch artist created one of her installations at the Le Rayolet in the botanical garden Domaine du Rayol. The wooden chairs meld into a stream of organized logs that connect the work to the surrounding gardens. The piece seems to go from solid to fluid, forming a bridge that she explains “makes us aware of the cross-over between culture and nature.” Molen produces a similar effect in A Wave of Nostalgia which she installed at the Museum Lolland-Falster in Pederstrup, Denmark in 2014. You can view a wider range of her installations on her website. (via WOMENSART)

"Flux" (2015), Domaine du Rayol, Rayol du Canadel, France

“Flux” (2015), Domaine du Rayol, Rayol du Canadel, France

"Flux" (2015), Domaine du Rayol, Rayol du Canadel, France

“Flux” (2015), Domaine du Rayol, Rayol du Canadel, France

"A Wave of Nostalgia" (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

“A Wave of Nostalgia” (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

"A Wave of Nostalgia" (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

“A Wave of Nostalgia” (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

"A Wave of Nostalgia" (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

“A Wave of Nostalgia” (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

"A Wave of Nostalgia" (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

“A Wave of Nostalgia” (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark