Photography

A Caterpillar of Feathers

March 30, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Here’s a fantastic optical illusion courtesy of mother nature. What looks like a vibrantly colored caterpillar perched on a tree limb is actually photographer José Luis Rodríguez’s chance encounter with nine extra cozy European Bee-eaters. The photographer named the image Oruga de Plumas, which translates roughly to “Caterpillar of Feathers”. (via neatorama)

 

 



Art

Geological Street Art Seen on the Streets of L.A.

March 29, 2012

Christopher Jobson

For the past few months Paige Smith of A Common Name has been installing colorful geodes within the gaps of crumbling buildings and other public infrastructure on the streets of L.A. Each piece is site-specific and made from carefully cut and painted paper. I think it would be pretty awesome to stumble onto one of these in the wild without knowing anything about it. You can see a full gallery of all the sedentary formations as well as a map of their locations over at A Common Name, and hey folks, don’t steal the geodes. (via present and correct)

 

 



Illustration

Cut Paper Illustrations by Bovey Lee

March 29, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Artist Bovey Lee hand cuts wonderfully detailed illustrations into Chinese rice paper creating nearly weightless artworks that seem to buzz with fantastical narratives. Born in Hong Kong, Lee now lives and works in Pittsburgh and you can see much more of her work here. Incredible work. (via everyday frustone)

 

 



Art

Geometric Rooms by Esther Stocker

March 28, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Italian installation artist Esther Stocker creates stunning geometric environments that can often be explored by the viewer. The construction of each piece appears to follow some type of strange equation, resulting in unusual linear patterns and planes that completely transform the physical pace. (via empty kingdom)

 

 



Art

An 80-Ton Bird's Nest Built at the Clemson University Botanical Gardens

March 27, 2012

Christopher Jobson

The Clemson Clay Nest was a public land art installation by Bavarian artist Nils-Udo that was constructed in the botanical gardens at Clemson University in South Carolina in 2005. The nest was built with the assistance of numerous students and other volunteers using 80 tons of pine logs harvested from the local Oconee County pine plantation and hundreds of bamboo stocks that were carefully organized into a circular structure dug in gardens rich red clay. After two years the piece was eventually dismantled and the mulched trees were used to partially fill the large hole. You can see many more of the work in these photos by Dylan Wolfe.

 

 



Art Photography

Time-lapse Portraits Layered and Cut to Reveal the Passage of Time

March 26, 2012

Christopher Jobson

For over a year I’ve been stalking the website of book and paper artist Ryuta Iida hoping to share new work with you and today I finally have something to show for it. As part of an ongoing collaboration with artist Yoshihisa Tanaka called Nerhol the duo are showing 27 new works at limArt this month including these astounding new portraits that are part of a series called Misunderstanding Focus. At first glance it looks as though a photograph has been printed numerous times, layered and cut into a sort of sculptural topography, which would indeed be amazing enough, but Nerhol took things a bit further. The numerous portraits are actually different, photographed over a period of three minutes as the subject tried to sit motionless, the idea being that it’s impossible to ever truly be still as our center of gravity shifts and our muscles are tense. The portraits are actually a layered lime-lapse representing several minutes in the subjects life and then cut like an onion to show slices of time, similar to the trunk of a tree. What a brilliant idea. If you’ve never seen Iida’s cut paper books, definitely head over to Nerhol to see them up close. A huge thanks to my friend Johnny at Spoon & Tamago for helping me translate some of this!