Art

New Interactive Street Art from Ernest Zacharevic

January 3, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Photo by
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Artist Ernest Zacharevic has been busy since first appearing on Colossal last summer with his unique style of street art that often relies on the interaction between physical objects and painted murals. The Malaysia-based artist traveled to Brussels and Panang to create new work, and also completed a series of ads for Toyota about parking lot safety. He also appears prominently in a new book about street art in his native Georgetown.

 

 



Animation

The Deep End: A Jaw-Dropping Animation Drawn by Hand with Ink, White-out, and Coffee by Jake Fried

January 3, 2013

Christopher Jobson

Boston-based animator Jake Fried just released his latest psychedelic animation, The Deep End, which was drawn entirely with ink, coffee, and white-out. The animation is continually layered on top of itself as forms morph, bend and transform across the screen. I can’t help but wonder how thick the final canvas is with so many layers of illustration. If you were as blown away by this as I was, you’re in luck: see some of his earlier animations such as Sick Leave and Waiting Room.

 

 



Amazing

This is What Fireworks Look Like in Reverse

January 2, 2013

Christopher Jobson

Filmmaker Julian Tay shot some footage of the 2012 New Years fireworks at Docklands in Melbourne, Australia and then decided to see what happened if he digitally reversed it. The result is strangely beautiful as all the little rockets move in reverse creating pretty counter-intuitive visuals, imploding into nothingness. An appropriate addendum, Reddit user ksli832 was reminded of this passage by Kurt Vonnegut from Slaughterhouse-Five:

The formation flew backwards over a German city that was in flames. The bombers opened their bomb bay doors, exerted a miraculous magnetism which shrunk the fires, gathered them into cylindrical steel containers, and lifted the containers into the bellies of the planes. The containers were stored neatly in racks… When the bombers got back to their base, the steel cylinders were taken from the racks and shipped back to the United States of America, where factories were operating night and day, dismantling the cylinders, separating the dangerous contents into minerals. Touchingly, it was mainly women who did this work. The minerals were then shipped to specialists in remote areas. It was their business to put them into the ground, to hide them cleverly, so they would never hurt anybody again.

Happy new years folks, 2013 is going to be amazing. (via laughing squid)

Update: The music is Moon Behind the Tree by Serphonic.

 

 



Art

Brilliant Urban Interventions by OakOak Turn Crumbling City Infrastructure into a Visual Playground

January 2, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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According to the Outsiders, street artist OaKoAk lives and works in St. Etienne, France where he works not as an artist but instead at a desk as a “pen pusher”. Untrained in painting or fine art of any kind, he instead uses stencils, paint, and occasionally adhesive superheros to give new meaning to simple cracks in the ground or crumbling building facades. You can see tons more on his blog as well as Facebook.

 

 



Art Illustration

New Maddeningly Complex Doodle Drawings from Sagaki Keita

January 2, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Japanese artist Sagaki Keita (perviously here and here) recently updated his portfolio with a number of new works from 2012. Keita creates composite pen and ink illustrations using thousands of densely scribbled doodles, goofy characters seemingly born from the margins of notebook paper that then form everything from Roman statues to artworks from pop culture. Several of these illustrations are actually part of a commissioned campaign for Expedia from late last year. You can see much more on his website.

 

 



Design

Explore the Underwater Topography of North American Lakes with these Laser-Cut Wood Maps by 'Below the Boat'

January 1, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Launched less than a month ago, Below the Boat makes gorgeous bathymetric charts (the underwater equivalent of a topographic map) using laser-cut layers of Baltic birch that are then carefully glued together to create what you see here. They have over two dozens charts currently available organized by East Coast, West Coast, and Interior Lakes. (via gessato)