Art

Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki

February 23, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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When first approaching the artwork of Japanese artist Takahiro Iwasaki it’s entirely possible you might miss it altogether. Not only are his small buildings and electrical towers excruciatingly small and delicate, but they also rest on absurdly mundane objects: rolls of tape, a haphazardly wrinkled towel, or from the bristles of a discarded toothbrush. Only on close inspection do the small details come into focus, faint hints of urbanization sprouting from disorder. My favorite pieces are his topographical maps that have been carefully cut from thick rolls of gray and blue electrical tape. Many of these objects were on view as part of the Constellations show at Cornerhouse in Manchester back in 2011 and at C24 Gallery last year. However Iwasaki currently has a new collection of much larger works at the 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art at GOMA in Queensland, much of which you can see over at designboom. (via artscharity.org, cornerhouse, c24 gallery, karl steel)

 

 



Art

A Giant Geometric Vortex of Colored Tape by Megan Geckler

February 21, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Currently on view at the Lancaster Museum of Art and History is an impressive swirling vortex of colored flagging tape titled Rewritten by machine on new technology by LA artist Megan Geckler. I’ve long been a fan of Geckler’s site-specific tape installations that transform the interiors of art museums, retail spaces, and even shipping containers into densely layered planes of occasionally vertigo-inducing line and color. Though I haven’t seen this particular piece in person, it’s fascinating to see how she’s layered colors from red to white creating the illusion that not only is the piece in motion, but that it almost seems to glow from within. Watch the video above to see the installation come together, and if you’re in the Lancaster, California area you have until March 10th, 2013 to check this piece out. All imagery courtesy the artist. If you liked this, don’t miss the thread works of Gabriel Dawe.

 

 



Design

Urban Vertical Garden Built From Hundreds of Recycled Soda Bottles

February 20, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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As part of an innovative partnership called Home Sweet Home (Lar Doce Lar) between multidisciplinary design firm Rosenbaum and TV producer Luciano Huck, the teams went through dozens of Brazilian homes doing dramatic makeovers of interior and exterior spaces. On their 48th home Rosenbaum designed a pretty amazing vertical garden that was suspended in a narrow walkway just outside the house. Response to the garden was so huge the firm quickly released design schematics (in Portuguese) detailing how to build one. A huge thanks to the team at Rosenbaum for sharing these photos with Colossal!

 

 



Art

Portraits Made of Shredded Poetry by Jamie Poole

February 20, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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While primarily working as a landscape painter and art teacher, UK artist Jamie Poole was struck with the idea of deconstructing printed poems into individual words and using the text to create large scale portraits. The final pieces are quite large measuring several feet tall, allowing for excruciating detail in both line and shadow, as well as creating an intriguing hybrid of portraiture, typography, and collage. You can see more images of Jamie’s work on his blog and in his Flickr stream. If you liked this, also check out the work of Evan Wondolowski and Lola Dupre. (via junk culture)

 

 



Design

Chuck: A Flexible Wooden Bookshelf

February 19, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Chuck is an awesome shelving concept by German designer Natascha Harra-Frischkorn. The flexible shelving unit is made from six 4mm thick planks of wood that can be adjusted to hold small collections of books and other objects in a beautiful organic shape. Really wish this was actually a thing. (via soft shock)

 

 



Photography Science

Massive Bird Nests Built on Telephone Poles in Southern Africa are Home to Multiple Species of Birds

February 18, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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No these aren’t haystacks stuck in a phone pole. Visit the Kalahari Desert in the south of Africa and you’re bound to run into a peculiar animal called the Sociable Weaver Bird. The birds are called “social” not just because they live in organized colonies, but because they build massive homes out of sticks, grass and cotton that are home to several other kinds birds. That’s right, the nests are so large that birds of other species are welcome to setup shop, not the least of which is the South African pygmy falcon which lives exclusively inside the social weaver’s nests that often accommodate over 100 birds at at time. Via the San Diego Zoo:

The sociable weaver’s nest sees plenty of guests—a regular Kalahari Desert inn! The South African pygmy falcon Polihierax semitorquatus relies completely on the sociable weavers’ nest for its own home, often nesting side by side with the sociable weavers. The pied barbet, familiar chat, red-headed finch, ashy tit, and rosy-faced lovebird often find comfort in the cozy nesting chambers, too. Vultures, owls, and eagles will roost on the nests’ broad roof. Why are weavers willing to share the huge nest they worked so hard to make? More residents mean more eyes keeping a watch for danger. And the weavers often learn from the other birds where new sources of food can be found.

Photographer Dillon Marsh has a lovely series of weaver bird nest photographs titled Assimilation that are well worth a look. (via neatorama)

 

 

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Sailing Ship Kite