Art

Edison's Cradle? A Kinetic Toy Reinvented with Light

August 5, 2012

Christopher Jobson

As part of his senior thesis exhibition at Musashino Art University in Tokyo, art student Yasutoki Kariya re-imagined the ubiquitous desktop gadget, Newton’s Cradle, using a lovely sequence of light bulbs. Entitled Asobi (which translates roughly as “playing“) the 11-bulb installation creates a visual interpretation of the popular toy named after Sir Isaac Newton demonstrating his third law of motion regarding momentum: that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. However, instead of actual energy created by the kinetic force of steel balls, Kariya devised a method for using programmed light and two surreptitiously placed pistons to create this purely visual experience that’s arguably more mesmerizing than the original concept.

As an added super bonus, the team over at the Experiments in Motion blog created the animation above which easily contends for one of the most beautiful animated gifs I’ve ever seen, already racking up over 167,000 shares on Tumblr this weekend.

Asobi was nominated for the 2012 Mitsubishi Junior Designer Award. (via spoon & tamago)

 

 



Design

Lamps Made from Sawmill Waste and Tree Branches Embedded with Resin and LEDs

August 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

For his Brecce collection, Italian designer Marco Stefanelli devised an ingenious way of removing fragments from sawmill scraps, tree branches, and cement fragments, and replacing them with perfectly sculpted resin embedded with LEDs. The resulting lamps retain the organic nature of their original form yet cast a beautifully subdued light. You can see much more on Stefanelli’s blog. (via the awesomer)

 

 



Photography

Colorful Portraits from the 2012 Festival of Colors by Thomas Hawk

August 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

San Francisco photographer Thomas Hawk has a great collection of portraits taken during the 2012 Holi Festival of Colors (previously) at Spanish Fork, Utah earlier this year. No matter how many times I see photos and videos of this day, I never get tired of it. It’s simply the most joyous looking celebration I could imagine.

 

 



Art Design

Tropical Lego Birds

August 2, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Ornithological LEGO master Tom Poulsom has followed up his wonderful British bird series with a new set of tropical birds featuring macaws, hummingbirds, finches and more. Poulsom says he’s well on his way in gaining enough support on the LEGO CUUSOO site to turn some of these birds into commercially produced models but needs a few more votes. I think I would honestly buy the entire set, so help me help Tom help me and give him a vote and imagine me giving you a giant eHigh-five.

 

 



Art

A Canopy of Colorful Umbrellas Spotted in Portugal

August 1, 2012

Christopher Jobson

This beautiful installation of umbrellas was recently spotted in Águeda, Portugal by photographer Patrícia Almeida. Almost nothing is known about the artist behind the project or its significance, but it’s impossible to deny the joy caused by taking a stroll in the shadowy rainbow created by hundreds of parasols suspended over this public walkway. It reminds be of Garth Britzman’s bottle carport. (via my modern met)

 

 



Art

A Giant Labyrinth Constructed from 250,000 Books

August 1, 2012

Christopher Jobson

The cavalcade of art projects surrounding the 2012 Summer Olympics in London continues today with the completion of this enormous book maze designed and built by Brazilian artists Marcos Saboya and Gualter Pupo (and over fifty volunteers) at Southbank Centre. Entitled aMAZEme, the stacked and twisting labyrinth based on a fingerprint belonging to writer Jorge Luis Borges was built using 250,000 remaindered, used and new books, most of which are on loan from Oxfam and will be returned after the exhibit. The piece covers over 500 square metres, with sections standing up to 2.5 metres high and will be on display in the Clore Ballroom through August 25th. Watch the time-lapse video above to see the entire project come together, the volunteers worked through the night for five days to finish in time.