Art

Banksy Goes to the Olympics

July 23, 2012

Christopher Jobson

It looks like a potential crackdown on graffiti artists prior to the 2012 Olympics in London didn’t involve the world’s most famous street artist. Two new pieces by Banksy were posted to his website this morning featuring his personal take on the games. I feel the same as Bobby over at The Fox is Black in hoping there’s more to come.

Update: There’s a great article over at The Atlantic Wire about Banksy and the politics of street art during the 2012 Olympic Games.

 

 



Art

Murals Created with Thousands of Buttons, Pins and Beads by Ran Hwang

July 23, 2012

Christopher Jobson




East Wind from Old Palace. 180 x 360cm. Three panel, buttons, beads, and pins. 2012.




Healing Blossoms. 170 x 826 cm. Buttons, beads, pins on wooden panel.




Empty Me. 210 x 360cm. Buttons, beads, pins. 2010.

Part mural, part sculpture, with elements of tapestry and painting, it’s almost impossible to define the work of Ran Hwang who uses thousands of components including pins, buttons and beads to create these enormous wall-sized images. The works require numerous repetitive motions and Hwang compares her process to a monk achieving zen. Via her artist statement:

I create large icons such as a Buddha or a traditional vase, using materials from the fashion industry. The process of building large installations are time consuming and repetitive and it requires manual effort which provides a form of self-meditation. I hammer thousands of pins into a wall like a monk who, facing the wall, practices Zen.

Starting July 26th Hwang will be exhibiting with Leila Heller Gallery at Art Southampton, featuring one of her newest works, Healing Blossoms (above). The 27-foot long piece is made from paper buttons, beads and sequins that have been gently hammered into 7 large panels. All imagery courtesy Leila Heller Gallery, and if you enjoyed this also see the work of Laurel Roth.

 

 



Design

Face Reality As It Is: Anamorphic Typography by Thomas Quinn

July 23, 2012

Christopher Jobson

When viewed head on, what at first looks like typography on top of a simple photograph reveals itself to be well-executed anamorphic typography by Chicago designer Thomas Quinn. The illusion is created using a standard light projector that projects the intended design on an uneven surface which is then carefully painted. From every other angle the work looks skewed and almost illegible, but when you stand at just the right spot everything seems to pop into place. You can see many variations of anamorphism right here on Colossal, and don’t forget the absolute master of the art form, Felice Varini. (via this isn’t happiness)

 

 



Art

Gregor Gaida's Aluminum Boys Destroy Art Gallery Floors

July 23, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Artist Gregor Gaida (previously) lives and works in Bremen, Germany. His figurative sculptures often depict aggressive, even violent people engaging with each other under unknown circumstances, as with this pair of mischievous aluminum boys titled Attaboys. Gaida says that he often bases his figures off of images found in magazines and books.

The found footage is often no more than an impulse that is no longer discernible in the further development of the shape. Analogous to photography, my objects are three-dimensional snapshots. The characters are frozen in movement and often cropped along imaginary image borders. I transport the fragmented character of photos into the third dimension. Simultaneously, when dealing with color and options of shaping, painterly characteristics appear. Thus, the life-sized special interventions are formally attributed to sculpture but are equally part of painterly and photographic categories.

Attaboys appears to be a reinterpretation of another set of sculptures from 2008, Kind und Kreide II, where two similar boys are seen drawing a line with chalk. I don’t know if the artist intends to draw a parallel between the two works, but I’m going to go with it. It leaves me wondering what they’ll be up to in four years from now. If you happen to be in Germany you can see Gaida’s work at PARROTTA Contemporary Art in Stuttgart through August 4th. All imagery courtesy the artist and PARROTTA Gallery. (via anita leocadia)

 

 



Photography

Point of View

July 22, 2012

Christopher Jobson

I absolutely love the perspective in this pair of images by German photographer Christopher Hassler shot in a tunnel using a fisheye lens. See more of his work over on Facebook.

 

 



Art Illustration Music

Over 100 High School Students Draw 3,000 Frame Music Video for Michael Andrews

July 21, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Musician Michael Andrews (best known for his cover of the Tears for Fears song “Mad World” recorded with Gary Jules for the Donnie Darko soundtrack) just completed this fantastic collaboration with over 100 students from Dan Diego-based High Tech High International who drew over 3,000 frames for a video for his new single “Bubbles in Space”. I can’t think of anything I did in high school art that approaches anything this awesome. Great job guys. See the making of here.