Art

Michael Murphy

September 28, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Michael Murphy’s solo show, LOOK, recently opened at gallery nine5 in New York. His artworks span a wide variety of media including multi-layered 3D sculptures, sound installations, and paintings with materials including nails, shadows, water, and sandblasted bullet-proof glass. Some of my favorite pieces are shown above, and you can see more in the show’s catalogue. Better yet, stop by gallery nine5 through October 6. (thnx, irina!)

 

 



Art

Incredible Brushless Paintings by Amy Shackleton

September 27, 2011

Christopher Jobson

First: watch the video. Twenty-five year old, Toronto-based artist Amy Shackleton paints these lusciously drippy paintings without use of a brush or fingers, instead she relies on good old gravity (and occasionally string as a guide) to move the paint slowly across the canvas in delicately controlled pours. The video above captures the somewhat tedious yet brilliant process in detail, as a 30-hour painting session condensed into two minutes. I find this so unbelievably amazing and beautiful. See more of her work here, and you’ll have a chance to see it in person at Art Toronto 2011 in October. (via gizmodo)

 

 



Photography

Sequence

September 27, 2011

Christopher Jobson

A lovely photo series of New York’s Williamsburg Bridge by Brooklyn-based photographer Mon Zamora.

Update: See the colorful ovals pasted to the metal rafters above the bridge? They’re actually part of an ongoing art project called Baji Lives by artist Peter Brock. Thanks to both Hrag and Peter himself for bringing this to my attention!

 

 



Art Photography

New Photography Sculptures by Gwon Osang

September 27, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Korean artist Gwon Osang (previously) unveiled three new sculptures last week as part of the 2011 Artists with Arario exhibition in Seoul. Osang makes a sort of joking mockery of sculpture by overlaying life-sized mannequins with detailed photographs of the original subjects. The results are both strangely realistic and quite bizarre.

 

 



Art

Thread Paintings by Cayce Zavaglia

September 26, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Cayce Zavaglia creates these impossibly layered embroidered portraits using methods more akin to delicate brush strokes with perfectly mixed paint than your mother’s cross-stitch. Via her website:

Initially, working with an established range of wool colors proved frustrating. Unlike painting, I was unable to mix the colors by hand. Progressively, I created a system of sewing the threads in a sequence that would ultimately give the allusion of a certain color or tone. The direction in which the threads were sewn had to mimic the way lines are layered in a drawing to give the allusion of depth, volume, and form. Over time the stitches have become tighter and more complex but ultimately more evocative of flesh, hair, and cloth.

Her online porftolio contains another 14 unique portraits. (via rhumboogie)

 

 



Photography

The North Korean Mass Games Performed by 100,000 People

September 26, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Photographer Sam Gellman who is originally from Wisconsin has been living and working in Hong Kong for the past five years. He recently returned from a 4-day trip to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea where he was able to witness and photograph the Mass Games in Pyongyang. The Mass Games are a meticulously regimented display of gymnastics and other performing arts by nearly 100,000 participants, heavily laden with messages of state-sponsored propaganda. Perhaps the most incredible sight is that of the colorful backdrops consisting of thousands of perfectly placed children who sequentially flip through pieces of paper, creating staggering pictures of flags, horses, and slogans. Ten drunk sports fans with a team name written on their chests this is not. Gellman says via Flickr of the image above:

This shot was taken at the Mass Games, a propaganda-filled 100,000 person choreographed performance of simultaneous dancing and gymnastics on the field of Pyongyang’s May Day stadium. The image in the background of the horse is made up of 20,000 “pixels” which are constantly being changed into new images, each pixel by a different Korean kid. Each time they turn the page to create a new giant picture, they cry out, mixing the shout with the noise of thousands of pages turned at the same moment.

This display, and the forces at work behind it, equally fascinate and terrify me. If you want to see more, Gellman has published nearly 50 photos from his trip.