Art Design

A French Hotel Room Half Covered in Graffiti

February 28, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Internationally recognized graffiti artist Tilt has just completed this eye-popping interior design work for the Au Vieux Panier hotel in Marseille, France. The hotel has just five rooms that are annually reconceptualized by commissioned artists and designers, somewhat similar to NYC’s Carlton Arms. For this space entitled Panic Room (which might aptly describe your mental state after a few nights in this Willy Wonkaesque environment) Tilt divided the room perfectly down the middle, one half covered entirely in his trademark vibrant and bubbly graffiti and the other half left stark white. See a sneak peek of all five concepts at Au Vieux Panier, including a room by Philippe Baudelocque who draws fantastic illustrations of animals using chalk. All in all, if I were checking in, Panic Room would be the clear choice. Photography above by the Big Addict. (via my modern met)

 

 



Art

Light Sculptures by Makoto Tojiki

February 28, 2012

Christopher Jobson




The Man with No Shadow, 2009




The Horse with No Shadow, 2010


The Blue Bird 2009

Japanese artist Makoto Tojiki works primarily with light, exploring its use in installations, figurative sculptures, as well as kinetic pieces. His No Shadow works shown above are among my favorite, using long strands of lights to create representations of people and animals. See much more over in his gallery.

 

 



Photography

Floral X-Rays by Brendan Fitzpatrick

February 27, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Photographer Brendan Fitzpatrick has been shooting photos for over 20 years, and for the last seven has been living and working in Singapore. These colorful floral x-rays were the result of several radiology experiments that ended with help from a radiography lab in Singapore who assisted him with use of a digital x-ray system followed by a few rounds of image editing and color correction in Photoshop to reach the final results you see here. Several of the specimens are available as prints over on Society6. For a polar opposite project, also check out his Anonymous Aliens series, which confronts the dehumanization of transient workers and their often unrecognized contribution to modern society by capturing anonymous stormtroopers enduring the back-breaking labor often performed by migrants.

 

 



Animation Design

Kinetic Rings Mimic the Flight of Birds

February 27, 2012

Christopher Jobson



Kansas-based metalsmith and jeweler Dukno Yoon creates rings, bracelets, and other devices that mimic the movements of birds by harnessing the motion caused by the flick of the wrist or flexing of fingers. Yoon received his BFA from Kookmin University, Seoul and a MFA from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio and most recently has been working on a series of metronomes that also explore the movement of birds. Though I was only able to embed a few of the animated examples of his work above, head over to his Wings gallery to see many more devices in action, the bracelets in particular are really fun to watch. If you like the kinetic nature of these pieces also check out the work of Gary Schott.

The animated GIFs above are pretty large and might take a moment to load if you’re on a slower connection. We’ll see how the bandwidth does for this post and I’ll do my best to keep them up.

 

 



Amazing

Tilt-Shift Carnaval in Rio de Janeiro

February 26, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Though tilt-shift photography is widely overused these days, this clip by Keith Loutit and Jarbas Agnelli could be one of the best examples of the method I’ve ever seen. Shot during the 2011 Carnival parade in Rio de Janeiro and set to music by Agnelli that evokes Phillip Glass, The City of Samba turns this annual spectacle of staggering scale and proportion into a delightfully miniaturized version that feels as though thousands of toys are tromping through a kitchen cabinet. The parade starts around 2:00 but do yourself a favor: switch it to HD/full-screen, and watch it all the way through. (via vimeo)

 



 

 



Animation Music

Love Is Making Its Way Back Home: A Stop Motion Animation Using 12,000 Sheets of Construction Paper

February 23, 2012

Christopher Jobson

This great new video for Josh Ritter’s Love Is Making Its Way Back Home was directed by Erez Horovitz and involves the meticulous animation of over 12,000 laser-cut pieces of construction paper. Via Etsy:

A team of nearly twenty artists, editors, directors and product assistants ushered the video into being. The group started with storyboarding and computer animation before converting the digital graphics to paper cutouts (frame by frame), photographing those 12,000 cutouts and then stitching them together into four minutes of paper animation.

You can learn more about how it was done and see some great behind the scenes shots on Josh Ritter’s blog. (via etsy)