3d printing

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Art Design Music Science

Turn Songs into 3D-Printed Sculptures You Can ‘Listen To’ with Reify

April 14, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Since the earliest days of Winamp and other media players with vizualization software that transformed our favorite songs into pulsing animations, we’ve all grown accustomed to “seeing” music on a computer screen. A new company called Reify aims to put those same sound wave interpretations in your hands, as 3d-printed sculptures. Lead by founder and CEO Allison Wood, the team is creating software that turns any snippet of audio—from rock music to spoken poetry—into curious objects 3d-printed from bronze, plastic, or even coconut husk.

Reify is also creating software that allows you to ‘scan’ the sculptures with your phone to interpret them back into audio. It’s not clear from their concept video if the music is recognizable, but that’s probably not the point. These sound sculptures seem to be more about visual presentation than media like vinyl or a phonograph.

The Reify project has the unique distinction of being the fastest growing company born from NEW INC, the first museum-led (non-profit) incubator conceived by the New Museum in 2013. You can see many more music sculptures on their Tumblr. (via the Creator’s Project)

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“Ride of the Valkyries” by Richard Wagner

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“Spin, Spin” by Gordon Lightfoot

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“How Music Works” by David Byrne

 

 



Craft Dance

Transport a Miniature Garden by Bike or Necklace with Colleen Jordan’s 3D Printed Planters

April 9, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Colleen Jordan’s Easter egg-hued vases are the perfect springtime accessory. Built in miniature, her creations are sized to carry small succulents or pocket-sized flower arrangements on one’s neckline, lapel, finger, or bicycle handle. The Atlanta-based designer and artist recently made Wearable Planter her full time gig, and each piece is influenced by the many places she has lived—including Sweden, Hawaii, and South Carolina. Jordan explains that through her business she strives to “create things to make life more pleasant.”

Each planter is 3D printed out of nylon and dyed individually. The planters are also sealed with acrylic varnish to keep out rain and maintain their bright color. Most of the vessels are designed with a flat bottom so they can also decorate your table or desk while not being worn. Jordan’s tiny planters can be purchased via her Etsy, and other crafts and miscellanea can be viewed on the Wearable Planter Instagram. (via iGNANT)

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Design Food Science

Edible Growth: 3D-Printed Living Food That Grows before You Eat It

March 2, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Photo by Bart van Overbeeke

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3D-printed nylon prototype

Edible Growth is an ongoing project by Eindhoven-based food designer Chloé Rutzerveld that blends food, gardening, and 3d printing. The concept involves a specially printed outer casing made from dough that contains “edible soil” and various seeds. Once printed, it takes a few days for the seeds and mushrooms to germinate after which they start to poke out of the small holes on top. All that’s left to do is pop it in your mouth. Rutzerveld’s design is currently just a concept and would involve several years of research, namely around 3d printing technology and issues of food safety. Regardless, it seems like the rest of the project would be fun just to try at home for the sake of novelty. You can read more about Edible Growth on Rutzerveld’s website. (via Dezeen)

 

 



Design

Your Face in a Vase: Custom 3D-Printed Vessels Containing Multiple Profiles

January 16, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Currently funding on Kickstarter, Fahz is a concept for a 3d-printed vase that contains multiple profiles of friends or family members embedded at different intervals around the surface of the vessel. The designers have plans to create vases containing up to 16 profiles, though I can’t quite imagine what that would look like. If you want your face in a vase, head over here. They hope to ship by Mother’s Day.

 

 



Animation Art Design

Fascinating 3D-Printed Fibonacci Zoetrope Sculptures

January 14, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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These 3d-printed zoetrope sculptures were designed by John Edmark, and they only animate when filmed under a strobe light or with the help of a camera with an extremely short shutter speed. He shares about the project:

These are 3-D printed sculptures designed to animate when spun under a strobe light. The placement of the appendages is determined by the same method nature uses in pinecones and sunflowers. The rotation speed is synchronized to the strobe so that one flash occurs every time the sculpture turns 137.5º—the golden angle. If you count the number of spirals on any of these sculptures you will find that they are always Fibonacci numbers.

For this video, rather than using a strobe, the camera was set to a very short shutter speed (1/4000 sec) in order to freeze the spinning sculpture.

If you happen to have a 3D printer handy, you can find instructions on how to make these over on Instructables. (via Stellar)

 

 



Design Food

Turn Boring Vegetables into Spaceships and Racecars with Le FabShop’s 3D-Printable ‘Open Toys’

November 24, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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If you’re interested in advanced techniques for playing with your food, the team at le FabShop just released a series of 14 components you can download, print, and attach to your favorite vegetable, effectively transforming turnips into helicopters and eggplants into submarines. A sort of DIY Mr. Potato Head for the 3d-printing generation. The free accessories are called Open Toys, and all 14 components can be downloaded here. If you’re looking for more 3D printed toys just in time for the holidays, check out this list from Cults. (via NOTCOT)

 

 



Art Design

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D-Printed Stones

October 1, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Stone Field 00 / exp00 – simple attractor exponential field. Digital rendering.

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Stone Field 05 / three attractors field. Digital rendering.

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Stone Field 04 / field based on vert dist from horizontal axis. Digital rendering.

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StoneFields 02 / polar 2d Perlin field. 3D-printed sculpture.

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Stone Field 00 / exp00 – simple attractor exponential field. 3D-printed sculpture.

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Stone Field 07 /simple 1d linear polar field. 3D-printed sculpture.

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Stone Field 07 /simple 1d linear polar field. 3D-printed sculpture, detail.

Back in 2009, Italian designer Giuseppe Randazzo of Novastructura released a series of generative digital “sculptures” that depicted carefully organized pebbles and rocks on a flat plane. Titled Stone Fields, the works were inspired in part by similar land art pieces by English sculptor Richard Long. As the images spread around the web (pre-dating this publication entirely) many people were somewhat disheartened to learn the images were created with software instead of tweezers, a testament to Randazzo’s C++ programming skills used to create a custom application that rendered 3D files based on a number of parameters.

Fast forward to 2014, and technology has finally caught up with Randazzo’s original vision. The designer recently teamed up with Shapeways to create physical prototypes of the Stone Fields project. He shares about the process:

Starting from 2009 project “Stone Fields”, some 3dmodels were produced from the original meshes. The conversion was rather difficult, the initial models weren’t created with 3dprinting in mind. The handling of millions of triangles and the check for errors required a complex process. Each model is 25cm x 25cm wide and was produced by Shapeways in polyamide (white strong & flexible). Subsequently they were painted with airbrush. […] The minute details of the original meshes were by far too tiny to be printed, however despite the small scale, these prototypes give an idea of the complexity of the gradients of artificial stones.

Watch the video above to see the sculptures up close, and you can see a few more photos over on Randazzo’s project site. If you liked this, also check out Lee Griggs.