anatomy

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Art Craft

Vessels of Woven Copper Wire by Sally Blake Mimic the Patterns of Natural Lifeforms

August 18, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Sally Blake, shared with permission

From her studio in Canberra, Australian artist Sally Blake (previously) twists and plaits copper wire into baskets and sculptures evocative of the organic matter ubiquitous around the planet. Seed pods, sprawling networks of bulbous pockets and thin, sinuous veins, and mammalian bronchial systems emerge from the malleable material, and through intricately woven motifs, Blake accentuates the tension between delicacy and resilience inherent to natural life. “Visualisation of the natural laws and patterning that hold people in relationship with Earth, as well as the consequences of these unravelling, is my focus,” she tells Colossal. “I feel deeply about disconnections in human understanding and care of the natural world, which result in environmental crises”

Currently, Blake is working on metallic vessels for a solo show opening on October 20 at Canberra’s Grainger Gallery, in addition to sculptures for a group exhibition in Sydney later this fall. She has a few baskets, in addition to stitched pieces and other two-dimensional works, available in her shop, and you can follow her latest projects—which include drawing all of the world’s owl species—on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art

Human Ears and Animals Emerge from Dense Fields of Porcelain Foliage Sculpted by Melis Buyruk

August 5, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Habitat” (2021), porcelain, 18k gold, 101 x 101 x 10 centimeters. All images courtesy of Leila Heller, shared with permission

Cradled within wooden boxes, leaves, blossoms, animals, and the occasional bit of human anatomy form the dense topographies of Melis Buyruk (previously). The Turkish artist blends various organic elements into sprawling, monochromatic works made of porcelain that are mesmerizing in intricacy with slightly unearthly undertones. In multiple recent works like the “Blooming Light” and “Golden Bloom,” for example, a single ear appears amidst the mosses and foliage, embedding the fragmented human body part within the largely floral ecosystem.

The works shown here are included in Buyruk’s solo show titled Habitat: Bloom, which is on view through September 2 at Leila Heller. Visit her Instagram for a peek into her studio and process.

 

“Nature’s Rhythm” (2022), porcelain, 18k gold, 196 x 196 centimeters

“Blooming Light” (2022), porcelain, 18k gold decorated lightbox, 100 x 100 x 12 centimeters

Detail of “Blooming Tales” (2022), porcelain, 22k gold decorated lightbox, 120 x 120 x 12 centimeters

“Sparrow’s Habitat” (2021), porcelain, 18k gold, 100 x 100 x 15 centimeters

“Golden Bloom” (2022), porcelain, 18k gold decorated, 115 x 115 x 15 centimeters

“Blooming Tales” (2022), porcelain, 22k gold decorated lightbox, 120 x 120 x 12 centimeters

 

 



Art

Systems Evoking Roots and Veins Sprawl Across Raija Jokinen’s Organic Flax Figures

July 26, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Raija Jokinen, shared with permission

Finnish artist Raija Jokinen (previously) echoes the natural shapes of botanics and anatomy in her elaborately formed figures. The sculptural works are comprised of sprawling webs that appear like both root and vein systems, with flowers and more dense, fleshy patches emerging from an arm or torso. Each piece fuses the physical and mental, Jokinen says, sharing that her “approach is focused on everyday feelings, situations, and thoughts we all have.”

The mesh works are created from flax—Jokinen employs a technique similar to that used for handmade paper—that she dyes and molds into branches, twigs, and other organic forms. She then adds floral and structural details through machine stitching, which also strengthens the otherwise fragile material. “With these methods, I am able to create free forms, like cut-outs, and transparent structures that allow strong shadows on the wall or occupy the space around it,” she says.

Many of Jokinen’s figures shown here are on view as part of a solo exhibition through October 9 at Château de Trévarez in Brittany, and she will also have pieces included in the International Mini Textile Exhibition in Bratislava this November. To see more of her works, check out her site and Instagram.

 

Photo by Philippe Robin

Photo by Philippe Robin

 

 



Art Craft

Beguiling Sculptures by Lana Crooks Fabricate Anatomical Parts from Wool and Silk

July 7, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Lana Crooks, shared with permission

Portland, Oregon-based artist Lana Crooks (previously) juxtaposes the softness of wool and silk with the solid, unyielding surfaces of bones. She stitches hand-dyed textiles into anatomical sculptures adorned with colorful florals or feathers that are both elegant and eerie. Often encased in glass domes, Crooks’s recent skeletal works include a hand wrapped in a loose bouquet, an ouroboros entwined with a blossoming vine, and a human ribcage suspended in an ornately carved wooden box.

Crooks has a few pieces available in her shop, in addition to Stranger Factory, where her work will be included in a few upcoming group shows. Explore a larger archive of her spectral sculptures on her site and Instagram.

 

 

 



Art

Paper Constructions Confine Skeletons to Uncanny Spaces in Jason Limon’s Paintings

May 26, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Cramped” (2022), acrylic on panel, 12 x 16 inches. All images © Jason Limon, shared with permission

San Antonio-based artist Jason Limon (previously) conjures paper sculptures of 18th Century-style gowns, organs, and hollowed skulls with acrylic paint. The uncanny structures trap his recurring skeletal characters in cramped boxes and funhouse-esque constructions, where they attempt to disentangle themselves from their surroundings. Rendered in muted pigments, or what the artist calls “repressed tones,” the paintings utilize the anonymity and ubiquity of the bony figures to invoke emotional narratives. Limon explains:

Paper allows us to know the stories of the past, and I’ve always been drawn to that notion… I use paper to build the shapes to tell my thoughts. In most instances, I will use box-like or folded paper shapes, but more recently I want to explore the insides of these containers to see what complexities I might find.

The pieces shown here are part of Limon’s ongoing Fragments series and are part of Stripped Down on view through June 5 at Haven Gallery in Long Island. Limon also has another solo show slated for November at San Antonio’s BLK WHT GRY, and until then, you can browse originals and prints in his shop and follow his works on Instagram.

 

“Look at Me” (2022), acrylic on panel, 12 x 16 inches

“Bisected” (2022), acrylic on panel, 12 x 16 inches

Left: “Feel” (2022), acrylic on panel, 12 x 16 inches. Right: “Perplexed” (2022), acrylic on panel, 12 x 16 inches

“Elegance” (2022), acrylic on panel, 12 x 16 inches

“Outlines” (2022), acrylic on panel, 12 x 16 inches

Left: “Inside Out” (2022), acrylic on panel, 12 x 16 inches. Right: “Unseen” (2022), acrylic on panel, 12 x 16 inches

“Stripped Down” (2022), acrylic on panel, 12 x 16 inches

 

 



Art Craft

Elaborately Embellished Heart Sculptures by Ema Shin Reflect On the Anonymous Legacies of Women

May 5, 2022

Kate Mothes

Image © Matthew Stanton. All images courtesy of the artist and shared with permission

Like many Korean families, artist Ema Shin’s relatives maintain a genealogy book called a jokbo, which illustrates their family tree. Shin’s ancestral record spans 32 generations, yet only male members of the family are represented. Born and raised in Japan, and currently based in Melbourne, Australia, the artist describes in a recent statement that “in the society that I was born and raised in, there was a prejudice between men and women, and their roles were predetermined. I always felt uncomfortable with this inequality.” In her series Hearts of Absent Women, she celebrates and recognizes women whose achievements remain obscured by history.

Heart-shaped forms made from fabric are elaborately embellished with colorful threads and beads in an homage to the organ’s connection with emotion and vitality. They are nearly life-size, and the range of woven and stitched textures are captivatingly tactile. Both anatomical and fanciful, the arteries, veins, and ventricles become distinctive expressions in needlework that reflect strength, resilience, and individuality. Since becoming a mother herself, Shin has been particularly interested in honoring women’s lives and bodies, recognizing the anonymous contributions of those in her family and around the world and acknowledging their stories for the future.

Some of Shin’s work can be seen at the Victoria Craft Awards 2021 exhibition through May 21. She has limited-edition prints from the series for sale on her website, and you can also follow her on Instagram.

 

Image © Ema Shin

Image © Matthew Stanton

Image © Ema Shin

Image © Ema Shin

Image © Matthew Stanton

Image © SoulTradr

Image © Matthew Stanton

Image © Oleksandr Pogorily

 

 

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