anatomy

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Art Craft Photography Science

Self Portraits Embroidered With Images of Blood Vessels, Bones, and Muscle Tissue by Juana Gómez

February 28, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Juana Gómez turns her gaze inward in order to understand the larger systems that compose the outside world. She embroiders the bones, muscles, veins, and synapsis that lie below her skin onto self-portraits, tracing her biological structures as a way to translate the similar patterns found in nature and modern civilization.

“There is fundamental law that can be seen in the veins of a leaf, the course of rivers and their tributaries, the circuits of the central nervous system, the currents of the sea, and the routes of traffic on the Internet,” says Gómez in an artist statement. “Deciphering this common language, which connects the micro cosmos with the macro cosmos, the external and the interior world, allows us to distinguish a pattern that influences inert, biological, social and cultural systems.”

Gómez first photographs sections of her body—face, torso, hands, legs, feet—which she then prints onto loose linen or another similar fabric. Next, she embroiders onto her duplicated skin, stitching brightly colored thread over her tattooed body (an element which adds another layer of texture to her personal works). In addition to these embroidered self-portraits, Gómez has also created an in situ thread-based work titled Cultivo. You can see both methods of her practice on her website.

 

 



Art Illustration

Dramatic Anatomical Drawings Comprised of Complex Hatched Colors by WanJim Gim

February 26, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Seoul-based artist WanJim Gim illustrates the form and gesture of the human body using complex hatched layers of color and dramatic lighting. He adds intrigue to poses that could be considered traditional figure drawing studies by adding abstracted lines and watercolor washes that integrate the fragmented body parts into a larger visual field. In an interview with Trending All Day, the artist describes his inspiration and process:

I’m interested in expressing body temperature and skin smell and am studying the relationship between color and energy (Qi) for my work… Currently I usually use oil pastel and colored pencils. They both have limited colors, so I need to overlap them to produce a color that I like. Even if I can’t express the color that I intend to make, I am satisfied with the exceptional effect coming from the imperfectness.

Gim studied animation in university, but began creating in his current style in earnest after coming across the work of painter and draftsman Lucian Freud. He shares his work on Instagram, as well as on his website.

 

 



Art

Textile Bodies Reveal Branched Systems of Veins, Flowers and Roots by Raija Jokinen

February 26, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Finnish artist Raija Jokinen creates sculptural bodies out of flax which attempt to reveal the complicated relationship between the mind and body. Webs of flowers, veins, and roots cover her textile torsos, shape-shifting between plant and human forms. Jokinen invites the audience to get lost in these visual similarities, as she makes no distinction between whether the pieces are actually nerves or sprouting tree branches.

“It is fascinating how body-related details, such as skin, blood vessels, and nerve tracks resemble the forms of roots or branches, as well as many other organic things,” Jokinen told Colossal. “I am excited in their apparent similarity, infinite variation, and how these visual allegories can be found almost everywhere. These forms are optimal for the life-support functions, and maybe also for our mind.”

Jokinen compares her sculptural practice to painting, using handmade flax rather than paint. An upcoming solo exhibition of her fibrous sculptures opens March 14 at Galleria Uusi Kipinä and runs through April 8. You can see more of her body-based works on her website.

 

 



Art

100 Fiberglass and Resin Skulls Fill a Room at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne

December 16, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Ron Mueck, an Australian artist known for his hyperrealistic figural sculptures, has created his largest work to date. His installation Mass contains 100 human skulls which are scattered and stacked throughout a gallery at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia.

The individual forms are created from fiberglass and resin, and when stood upright, rise to approximately three feet tall. In some areas of the installation piles reach five skulls in height, while in others visitors can approach individual works resting on the gallery’s floor. Placed amongst gilded paintings the works offer a somber reality, a morose peek into what physically relates each of us.

Mass opens December 15, 2017 as a part of the inaugural National Gallery of Victoria Triennial. Mueck is one of 100 international creatives that has contributed work to the exhibition which will run through April 18, 2018. (via Designboom)

 

 



Art

Brittle Skeletons Crocheted from Discarded Textiles by Caitlin McCormack

October 31, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Philadelphia-based artist Caitlin McCormack (previously) continues to explore the decay and remains of once-living things in her intricate crochet work. McCormick constructs her pieces using a labor intensive process that involves stiffening discarded textile materials with enamel paint to create brittle bone-like material. She then crochets fantastical intertwined skeletons of humans, birds, snakes, devils, and two-headed bats, which are displayed with stark black backdrops, glass cases, and lathed bases that reference old-fashioned displays for scientific specimens.

Her new show, Lazarus Taxa, refers to the paleontological concept of species that disappear and reappear in the fossil record. Lazarus Taxa is currently on display at Paradigm Gallery + Studio. You can also follow her on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Artist Ronit Baranga’s Disturbing Anatomical Dishware Creeps Across Tabletops

July 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist Ronit Baranga (previously) creates ceramic sculptural works she describes as existing on the “border between living and still life”—objects guaranteed to either tickle your funny bone or haunt your worst nightmares, depending on your perspective. Baranga depicts dishware as sprouting human fingers and gaping mouths as the objects traipse across tabletops or physically cling to one another in a permanent embrace. The pieces are both silly and sinister as they come to life as if from a cartoon. A quick scroll through her Instagram reveals even darker works that give us the bonafide heebie-jeebies.

Ronit most recently had work on view at the Gross Anatomies show at the Akron Art Museum, and is also a contruting artist to the Small Works 2017 with beinArt Gallery through August. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

A post shared by Ronit Baranga (@ronitbaranga) on

 

 



Art

Anatomical Cross-Sections of Human Heads Reveal a Menagerie of Found Objects

July 3, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Chicago-based artist duo Edwige Massart and Xavier Wynn (previously) sculpt cross-sections of human heads that are organized into compartments of tiny objects. The series began several years ago as an intersection of sorts involving Massart’s personal collection of found objects that she began at the age of four, and Wynn’s childhood discovery of “split body” models at Chicago’s Field Museum that inspired a lingering fascination with human anatomy. Each sculpture is given only a number (ie. Head 14) leaving the viewer to examine the compartments of objects and draw their own parallels and conclusions. You can see more recent work from the Heads series on their website. (via Colossal Submissions)