anatomy

Posts tagged
with anatomy



Art

Skull Made of Typewriter Parts by Jeremy Mayer

May 21, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Artist Jeremy Mayer (previously) recently completed a new sculpture titled Skull I made from vintage typewriter parts. As with all of his assemblages the skull was created without use of welding or adhesives, instead the parts are bent, screwed, and bolted into place using only components extracted from typewriters.

 

 

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Design Food

Piñata Anatomy

May 7, 2012

Christopher Jobson

This made me smile hugely. Piñata Anatomy by Minneapolis-based Carmichael Lynch of Carmichael Collective. (via laughing squid)

 

 



Illustration

Amazing Skull Drawn with a Dip Pen by Alex Konahin

April 25, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Latvian artist Alex Konahin spent two weeks drawing this gorgeous skull for clothing company Heretics using little more than black ink and a few dip pens (and probably a few decades of artistic experience). Konahin’s similarly meticulous line art was making the rounds on a number of blogs earlier this week. See much more over on Behance.

 

 



Art

Optical Illusion Skull Portraits by Tom French

April 16, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Painter Tom French just posted a number of new paintings in preparation for his upcoming exhibition titled Don’t Look Back at Zero Cool Gallery in London later this month. French’s acrylic works often depict couples in seemingly amorous relationships that create the optical illusion of a skull, pieces that walk the line between beautiful and unsettling. Just squint or take a few steps back from your monitor for maximum effect. You can see much more of his work on Flickr, and prints are available at Zero Cool.

 

 



Art Design

Embodiment: A Neon Skeleton by Eric Franklin

April 4, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Portland-based sculptor Eric Franklin constructs stunning (if not slightly disconcerting) anatomical light structures that are fully hollow and filled with ionized krypton, causing them to glow similar to a neon light. The glass skeleton above, Embodiment, is my jaw-dropping favorite of this series. The piece took over 1,000 hours of work over a two year period and is actually built from 10 separate units of glass formed from borosilicate glass tubing. The process of creating something like this is unbelievably painstaking as Franklin shares via email:

Every glass seal has to be perfect, and this piece contains hundreds. Everywhere one tube joins another, or a tube terminates, glass tubes were sealed together. They have to be perfect in order to preserve the luminosity of the krypton. If one rogue molecule gets inside the void of the glass tubing it can eventually contaminate the gas and it will no longer glow. There are times when the holes in the seals are so small that you cannot actually see them with your eyes without the help of a leak detector. Once the glass pieces are ready to get filled with gas, I pull a high vacuum while the glass is hot in order to evacuate any dust or water vapor from the interior surface until there are literally no molecules inside the void of the glass. Then the krypton can be introduced and the glass sealed off. It’s an extremely tedious process, one I have somewhat of a love/hate relationship with.

You can see much more of Franklin’s work on his website, and if you liked this also check out the work of Jessica Lloyd-Jones. Photos above courtesy Brad Carlile. (via my amp goes to 11)

 

 



Art

Anatomical Neon: Blown Glass Human Organs Containing Neon Lights by Jessica Lloyd-Jones

March 26, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Anatomical Neon is a series of blown glass lights by North Wales-based artist Jessica Lloyd-Jones meant to focus attention on how energy is used by the human body. Describing the four pieces via her website she says:

Brain Wave conveys neurological processing activity as a kinetic and sensory, physical phenomena through its display of moving electric plasma. Optic Nerve shows a similar effect, more akin to the blood vessels of the eye and with a front ‘lens’ magnifying the movement and the intensity of light. Heart is a representation of the human heart illuminated by still red neon gas. Electric Lungs is a more technically intricate structure with xenon gas spreading through its passage ways, communicating our human unawareness of the trace gases we inhale in our breathable atmosphere.

The pieces were funded in part by awards from Arts Council Wales and Wales Arts International and executed at Urban Glass in New York in 2010. (via pinterest)