aquariums

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Art

Mixed Media Aquarium Sculptures by Mariele Neudecker Mimic Paintings and Photographs

September 29, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Things Can Change in a Day, 2001. Mixed media incl. water, acrylic medium, salt, fibreglass. 68 x 56 x 57cm. Photo by Alex Ramsay.

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Things Can Change in a Day, 2001. Mixed media incl. water, acrylic medium, salt, fibreglass. 68 x 56 x 57cm. Photo by Alex Ramsay.

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Things Can Change in a Day, 2001. Mixed media incl. water, acrylic medium, salt, fibreglass. 68 x 56 x 57cm

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I Don’t Know How I Resisted the Urge to Run, 1998. Mixed media incl. water, acrylic medium, salt, fibreglass/ 75 x 90 x 61cm

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Stolen Sunsets, 1996

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Ship, 1998. Glass tank, water, food dye, salt, fibre-glass, model ship. 64.5cm x 70.5cm x 177cm

In a fascinating blend of chemistry and sculpture, artist Mariele Neudecker builds three dimensional images contained within large aquariums, an ongoing series she refers to as “Tank Works.” Starting with source materials that include romantic paintings and photographs, Neudecker creates environments that attempt to interpret the 2D imagery in three dimensional space. The representational pieces are contained entirely within glass tanks filled to the brim with water that also contain fiberglass mountains, model ships, and other sculptural objects. She also adds chemicals that provide an element of atmosphere while also forming a sort of contained climate that changes gradually over the course of days, weeks, and months.

While primarily a sculptor Neudecker also works with film, video, and installation, much more of which you can see on her website. She discuss her tank works a bit more in this 2009 interview with CAFKATV.

 

 



Design

The Incredible Underwater Art of Competitive Aquascaping

January 15, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Forest Scent, Pavel Bautin. Russia. 2010 IAPLC Grand Prize Winner

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Pale Wind, Takayuki Fukada. Japan. 2013 IAPLC Gold Prize

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Whisper of the pines, Serkan Çetinkol. Turkey. 2013 IAPLC Top 27

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Verve!, Chow Wai Sun. Hong Kong. 2011 IAPLC Bronze Prize

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Way to heaven, Dmitriy Parshin. Russia.

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Wild West, Stjepan Erdeljić. Croatia.

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Georgi Chaushev, Bulgaria. 2012 IAPLC Top 100.

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Francisco Wu, Spain. 2012 IAPLC Top 100.

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Long Tran Hoang, Vietnam. 2012 IAPLC Third Place.

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Pilgrimage, Shintaro Matsui. Japan. 2013 IAPLC Fifth Place.

No, these aren’t exactly your childhood goldfish bowls. The world of competitive aquarium design, or aquascaping, is just as difficult, expensive, and cutthroat as any other sport but requires expertise in many different fields to guarantee success. Aquarium designers possess large amounts of expertise in biology, design, photography, and excel in the art of patience, as individual aquascapes can take months if not years to fully mature into a completed landscape.

The world’s largest nature aquarium and aquatic plants layout competition is the International Aquatic Plants Layout Contest (IAPLC) which annually ranks hundreds of competitors from around the world with Asian and Eastern European countries generally dominating the top slots. While it’s somewhat difficult to track down galleries of winners from every year, above are some amazing entries from the last few years. To see more, oh so much more, check out: IAPLC Grand Prize Works, IAPLC 2013 Top 6, IAPLC 2012 Top 200 (or here), and the first Eastern European Planted Aquarium Design Contest.

 

 



Design

Bubble Tank

October 9, 2011

Christopher Jobson

The Bubble Tank by Richard Bell, Thomas McKeown and David Powell of Psalt Design is made to look as if the aquarium is moments from precariously dripping off the edge of a counter top. An alternative name could be the Anxiety Tank. (via juxtapoz)

 

 



Art

Goldfish Orchestra

September 8, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Quintetto is a music installation by the Italian artist collective Quiet Ensemble that tracks the movement of fish in five vertical tanks and translates their movements into audio.

“Quintetto” is an installation based on the study of casual movement of objects or living creatures used as input for the production of sounds. The basic concept is to reveal what we call “invisible concerts” of everyday life.
 The vertical movements of the 5 fishes in the aquariums is captured by a videocamera, that translates (through a computer software) their movements in digital sound signals.
We’ll have 5 different musical instruments creating a totally unexpected live concert.

Really lovely work. If you liked this, see also the sewing machine orchestra. (thnx, bernardo!)