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Art

Two Fabric Homes by Artist Do Ho Suh Float Above an Atrium in Incheon International Airport

October 13, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Home within Home” (2019), polyester fabric, stainless steel, 292.91 x 325.59 x 316.93 inches. Images © Do Ho Suh, courtesy of Lehmann Maupin, shared with permission

Living and working in London, Korean artist Do Ho Suh (previously) is concerned with “home, physical space, displacement, memory, individuality, and collectivity,” ideas he evokes in his life-sized fabric sculptures and installations. His 2019 piece “Home within Home,” which is suspended from an atrium in Incheon International Airport in Seoul, positions two structures vertically, with the larger polyester and steel construction on top. This newer work evokes a similar piece from 2013, titled “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” which placed replicas of Suh’s former living spaces within one another, from his first house in South Korea to an apartment building in Rhode Island.

Often using his own experiences as source material, Suh’s multi-media practice explores both the physical and metaphorical understandings of home as he considers the ways people occupy structures in specific times, locations, forms, and histories. “The spaces we inhabit also contain psychological energy, and in his work, he makes visible those markers of memories, personal experiences, and a sense of security, regardless of geographic location,” a statement about his practice says.

Suh is represented by Lehmann Maupin, and you can explore more of the artist’s architectural sculptures, installations, and smaller works on the international gallery’s site.

 

“Home within Home” (2019), polyester fabric, stainless steel, 292.91 x 325.59 x 316.93 inches

“Home within Home” (2019), polyester fabric, stainless steel, 292.91 x 325.59 x 316.93 inches

“Home within Home” (2019), polyester fabric, stainless steel, 292.91 x 325.59 x 316.93 inches

“Passage/s” (2017)

“Passage/s” (2017)

 

 



Design

Lively Interventions by 100 Architects Transform Urban Spaces into Vibrant Playgrounds

October 8, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Big Bang” in Pingjiaqiao Road 36, Pudong, Shanghai. All images © 100 Architects, shared with permission

Walk around Shanghai or Dubai, and you might stumble upon a bright, geometric playground amongst the concrete. The design studio 100 Architects installs bold interventions that transform typical urban spaces into colorful playgrounds. Each public structure, which boasts entertainment for both kids and adults, is conceptualized around a theme, whether a massive shower complete with ground-level waves or an illuminated castle with inner tunnels. Splashes of color, playground equipment like swings and slides, and towering structures frame the areas, while some spaces, like the “Sea Horse,” sprinkle water from a central spot.

100 Architects recently partnered with urban planning group Playgones to collaborate on a range of interventions throughout Europe in upcoming months, which you can follow on Instagram. (via Journal du Design)

 

“Creek Play” in Dubai Creek Harbor, Dubai, UAE

“Hang Out” in Pingjiaqiao Road 36, Pudong, Shanghai, China

“Paint Drop” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“Paint Drop” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“Seahorse” in Pingjiaqiao Road 36, Chongqing, China

“The Shower” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“The Shower” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“The Shower” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“Secret Garden”

“Secret Garden”

 

 



Design

Built From Rattan, A Sinuous Structure Houses a Yoga Sanctuary in Bangkok

September 28, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Enter Asia Projects

To transform a 450-square-meter space into serene pods for yoga, Thai architecture studio Enter Projects Asia built an undulating structure of rattan. Harvested from the palms of Southeast Asia, the natural material lines the walls and encloses the overhead lighting before swooping down to form a lengthy bench. The result is a serene, light-filled area that flows from ceiling to floor, mimicking the gentle movements of yoga poses.

Thai timber bears the structure’s load, while the rattan separates two large studios and two smaller, private rooms. The sanctuaries were designed for yoga brand Vikasa‘s retreats. “All elements of the project were made from natural, local materials to be a hub or a portal for their existing location, which is based on a hillside in Koh Samui: Thai hardwood, local black slate, bamboo and most notably, rattan,” Patrick Keane, design director for the Enter Projects Asai, told Dezeen.

The architecture studio collaborated with designer Project Rattan to combine classic weaving and 3D techniques, and local craftspeople used digitally created templates and frames to inform their construction process. A glass facade holds the rattan forms, which occupy the second floor of the building, with Vikasa’s cafe on the street level. It’s “an oasis of tranquillity amongst the chaos of Bangkok,” Keane says.

To follow Enter Projects Asia’s latest architectural endeavors, follow Keane on Instagram.

 

 

 



Design

Light Streams through a Swelling Canopy of Woven Bamboo in China's Karst Mountains

September 17, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Lllab.

An understated bamboo canopy situated among the verdant landscape of the Karst Mountains in Yangshuo, China, offers respite from the sun and frequent rainfall that blankets the area. Designed by Lllab. Architects for the outdoor theatrical performance of Impression Sanjie Liu, the curved structure merges seamlessly with the surrounding environment. Bamboo trees line the pathway the canopy occupies as it stretches across 140 meters.

Smaller lanterns are positioned at the entrance to the venue before the larger structure guides visitors to the main performance stage, which sits at the bank of the Li River. The canopy is hand-woven by local craftspeople, who utilize a specific technique that allows the suble form to be made entirely of the organic material without the use of glue or nails. Inside the permeable walls are load-bearing posts.

In a statement about the surging form, Lllab. notes that the architecture mimics the performers’ movements:

The hand weaving, bamboo playing off the tension of one another. The topography of the canopy ceiling dancing between columns of bamboo as if unsupported. Even the way guests are intended to move from lantern to lantern, in a narrative of interaction. Together these subtle hints encourage a particular frame of mind, readying the guest for the main feature.

To explore more of the architectural firm’s projects, head to Instagram. (via designboom)

 

 

 



Craft Design

Build a Miniature Hangout with a DIY Wooden Treehouse Kit

September 15, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Treetop Hangout.” All images © Tiny Treehouses, courtesy of Lars Wijers, shared with permission

A new DIY kit transforms any ordinary houseplant into a miniature haven complete with mood lighting. Created by Australia-based British designer Lars Wijers, Tiny Treehouses feature multiple configurations, from an ornate gazebo to a multi-roofed structure resembling tropical architecture. Each is equipped with LED lights (batteries included!) and manufactured to hang from a branch or rest on a flat surface.

Back the project on Kickstarter—$1 from every treehouse will be donated to restoring Australian forests—and follow Tiny Treehouses on Instagram for updates on designs and buying options.

 

“Tropical Lookout”

“Home Base”

“Tropical Lookout”

“Temple of Gratitude”

“Tiny Gazebo”

“Temple of Serenity”

 

 



Design

Old Railway Tracks Converge to Form an Arced Pavilion in Sydney by Studio Chris Fox

September 10, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Interchange Pavilion” in Sydney. All images © Studio Chris Fox, shared with permission

In 2017, artist Chris Fox utilized decades-old wooden escalators to create a sculptural ribbon above Sydney’s Wynyard Station. His latest project titled “Interchange Pavilion” similarly repurposes vintage railway tracks to construct a 350-square-meter outdoor pavilion. The work is comprised of 250 meters of stainless-steel rails, 15 tons of glass-reinforced concrete, and 1,400 pieces of hardwood. Built in sections, the rails in “Interchange Pavilion” offer several paths upward, where they converge at a central point.

If you’re in Sydney, check out the newly-opened public artwork, which was unveiled August 25. Otherwise, find more from Fox on Instagram.