architecture

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Design

Sunlight Streams into a Windowless Church Made of Wooden Slats in Japan

April 20, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Taira Nishizawa

The understated inside of a church in Shizuoka, Japan, lacks the traditional iconography and ornate trimmings often found in similar spaces. Designed by Tokyo-based architect Taira Nishizawa, Sunpu Church is a windowless building made mostly of slatted pine. The open roof allows sunlight to fill the space and cast moving shadows depending on the time of day. It also creates a direct view upward to the sky.

Because the modest building is located next to a busy railway, Nishizawa soundproofed the outer walls to ensure a quiet space for worshipers. In an interview with Arch Eyes, he spoke about his conceptualization process.

The Church Sun-Pu required specific spatial qualities. Just thinking functionally about a church, it’s not much different from a classroom. But the space must feel very different, so I needed a strategy to control that environment directly…I manipulated the performance of the external walls and roof to control the light and sound conditions, which are what distinguishes a church from a normal classroom or meeting place.

Despite its singular cross and intricate entrance panel, the red cedar facade is similarly stark and has turned gray since it was built in 2008. Follow what Nishizawa’s up to on Twitter, and check out the book chronicling his wooden projects. (via Jeroen Apers)

 

 



Art

Mimicking Architectural Sketches, Artist David Moreno Forms Sculptures of Countless Metal Strips

April 17, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © David Moreno

Rotterdam-based David Moreno (previously) prefers his spatial pieces to oscillate between initial sketches of architectural projects and fully-realized constructions. His steel sculptures are comprised of lengthy metal strips and piano strings that are arranged to form building complexes, cathedrals, and steep flights of stairs. Despite being three-dimensional artworks, they mimic an architect’s outlines with their swooping lines and grid-like qualities. Moreno shares a plethora of his imaginative projects on Behance, in addition to some progress shots on his Instagram.

 

 



Craft Design

Copenhagen's Distinct Architecture Knit into Color-Blocked Urban Landscapes by Jake Henzler

April 16, 2020

Anna Marks

All images © Jake Henzler, shared with permission

Instead of writing or illustrating a journal to record his excursions, Sydney-based artist Jake Henzler knits colorful memories of urban landscapes into huge pieces of art. The artist goes by the name of “‘Boy Knits World”’ on Instagram and crafts quilt-like panels of urban spaces that he comes across whilst traveling. 

Henzler lived in Copenhagen for a year, and during that time, he created an original hand-knitted blanket panel called “‘Copenhagen Building Blocks.” The large work celebrates the traditional, world-recognized architecture of Denmark’s capital. As a whole, the piece is made up of a series of six grid-like patterns, which Henzler has sewn together to form a larger piece. Each of the architectural blocks is named after a different district in the city and features Nørrebro Studios, Østerbro Studios, Hellerup Apartments, Nyhavn Hotel, Nørreport Offices, and Frederiksberg Apartments. 

In Copenhagen, much of the traditional architecture’s brick and woodwork is painted, and the diversity of colors throughout the city creates a strong sense of place. This architectural distinctiveness is illustrated throughout Henzler’s work, and each block comprises the traditional colors, framework, and patterns featured throughout the city’s vibrant districts.

To view more of Henzler’s work, visit his Instagram, and to buy the “Copenhagen Building Block” pattern, visit his Ravelry page. (via Lustik)

 

 



Design

Thick Greenery Swathes a Bamboo-and-Steel Complex in Indonesia

April 13, 2020

Grace Ebert

Realrich Architecture Workshop, aka RAW Architecture, completed Guha Bambu just this year, but the cascading vines, luxuriant shrubs, and grass-covered facades on the new project make it appear as an old building overtaken by nature. Each room of the nearly 6,500 square-foot complex has at least two entrances that often face north and south to exhibit the overflowing greenery.

Spanning three upper floors and two basement levels, the multi-use structure incorporates modern and traditional techniques like the fish mouth joint, which cuts the end of wood-like substance in a U-shape and positions another piece on top. It’s constructed using a combination of steel, wood, glass, metal, gypsum, bamboo, plastic, stone, and concrete.

Located in Tangerang, Indonesia, the new project is actually a renovation of the firm’s existing building named The Guild. It continues to house Omah Library, a dentist’s office, a private apartment, and RAW Architecture’s studio, which are separated at the entrance to prohibit the public from entering the private spaces. Each space is designed to be converted and reused for new tenants.

Follow RAW Architecture on Facebook for updates on its projects that merge lush botanicals and nature-based materials.  (via designboom)

 

 



Design

Hundreds of Rainbow Glass Panels Emit a Rotating Kaleidoscope in a Playful Kindergarten

April 9, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © SAKO Architects

In Tianshui, China, a clear dome casts sunlight onto 483 polychromatic glass panels lining a kindergarten’s windows, railings, and doorways. It gives the spacious building a kaleidoscopic effect, refracting varying hues onto the white walls and minimalist wood furnishings. “Color shades can grow and shrink as colors overlap and become different colors, or move from a vertical plane to a horizontal plane and back again,” architect Keiichiro Sako wrote on Instagram. “I hope that spending childhood in this beautiful light will foster the creativity of the children.”

Centered on the open atrium, the playful glass pieces and doorways are rounded, which is a nod to the school’s location in the Loess Plateau. They even border the outdoor recreation area, giving the kids a colorful and translucent view of the surrounding city. (via Trendland, thnx Laura!)

 

 



Design

A Massive Faux Staircase Punctuates A Glass-Sided Home Before Flowing into an Outdoor Garden

April 4, 2020

Grace Ebert

The design team at Nendo knew they’d need a way to connect the three generations—and eight cats—living inside a newly constructed home in the Shinjuku area of Tokyo, so they created an enormous staircase. Spanning from the outdoor garden to the third floor, the steel-and-concrete structure isn’t designed for climbing between floors but does serve as a multi-level garden area and space for the cats to lounge. It also conceals bathrooms and the staircase residents actually will use, while the white-paneled walls hold additional storage.

Aptly named Stairway House, the interruptive project juxtaposes connection and separation within one home, the design studio said in a statement.

A stairway and greenery gently connected the upper and lower floors along a diagonal line, creating a space where all three generations could take comfort in each other’s subtle presence. Not only does the stairway connect the interior to the yard, or bond one household to another, this structure aims to expand further out to join the environs and the city —connecting the road that extends southward on the ground level, and out into skylight through the toplight.

While a white facade masks the front of the house, the back is covered in windows that face the mature persimmon tree preserved on the property. For more of Nendo’s disruptive architecture, head to Instagram. (via Dezeen)