architecture

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Design History Photography

Sacred Spaces: The Grand Interiors of Modern Churches Across Europe and Japan by Thibaud Poirier

May 7, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Kirche am Hohenzollernplatz, Berlin, Germany - Johann Freidrich Höger, 1933, all images via Thibaud Poirier

Kirche am Hohenzollernplatz, Berlin, Germany – Johann Freidrich Höger, 1933, all images via Thibaud Poirier

Thibaud Poirier (previously) travels the world photographing the architectural spaces that surround us as we live, sleep, study, and pray. In his most recent series, the French photographer captured the interiors of 29 modern churches across Germany, The Netherlands, France, Denmark, and Japan to see how each city has designed structures of worship within the last century. In Sacred Spaces, Poirier uses the same focal point in each image. The stylistic choice makes it easier to compare the similarities of basic structures such as seating and pulpit placement, while contrasting the differences in interior design choices such as lighting and color palettes. You can see more modern churches from the series on his website, Instagram, and Behance.

Saint Moritz, Augsburg, Germany - John Pawson, 2013

Saint Moritz, Augsburg, Germany – John Pawson, 2013

Resurrection of Christ, Köln, Germany - Gottfried Böhm, 1957

Resurrection of Christ, Köln, Germany – Gottfried Böhm, 1957

Grundtvigs Kirke, Copenhagen, Denmark - Peder Vilhelm Jensen-Klint, 1927

Grundtvigs Kirke, Copenhagen, Denmark – Peder Vilhelm Jensen-Klint, 1927

Opstandingskerk, Amsterdam - Marius Duintjer, 1956

Opstandingskerk, Amsterdam – Marius Duintjer, 1956

Kapelle, Berlin, Germany - Axel Schultes and Charlotte Frank, 1999

Kapelle, Berlin, Germany – Axel Schultes and Charlotte Frank, 1999

Saint Joseph, Le Havre, France - Auguste Perret, 1956

Saint Joseph, Le Havre, France – Auguste Perret, 1956

Saint Anselm's Meguro, Tokyo, Japan - Antonin Raymond, 1954

Saint Anselm’s Meguro, Tokyo, Japan – Antonin Raymond, 1954

Notre dame du Chêne, Viroflay, France - Louis, Luc and Thierry Sainsaulieu, 1966

Notre dame du Chêne, Viroflay, France – Louis, Luc and Thierry Sainsaulieu, 1966

Saint Mary's Cathedral, Tokyo, Japan - Kenzo Tange, 1964

Saint Mary’s Cathedral, Tokyo, Japan – Kenzo Tange, 1964

 

 



Craft Design

Scenes From Award-Winning Literature Crafted With Hand-Cut Paper by Zim & Zou

April 30, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Paper artists and collaborators Zim & Zou (previously) were invited to create miniature worlds inspired by previous Nobel Prize winners in Literature. The tolerance-themed traveling exhibition Sharing Worlds was organized by the Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Foundation. The French duo built pieces based on Kristin Lavransdatter written by Sigrid Undset (published in 1920), and One Hundred Years of Solitude written by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (published in 1967). Using their own classic style, the pair created colorful scenes packed with geometric details. Their interpretation of Kristin Lavransdatter was created as an ode to 14th-century Norway with a technicolor city set between a pair of deep burgundy mountains. The other work, One Hundred Years of Solitude, features a verdant home nearly hidden from the world by a lush pink and green garden.

The exhibition closed last month, but you can take a virtual tour of it on the Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Foundation website. You can follow more of Zim & Zou’s recent work on their Instagram and Behance.

 

 



Design

A Verdant Landscape Breathes Life into a One-Bedroom Apartment in a Suburb of Mumbai

April 26, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

India-based architectural studio The White Room, run by Nitin Barchha and Disney Davis, uses minimal design and natural materials to create clean spaces bursting with plant life. In their recent project Garden Room the pair created a white and slate green sculptural setting that presents a calming segue from interior to outdoor space. The one bedroom apartment located in the Mumbai suburb of Pali Hill is teeming with vines and hanging plants that create a protective barrier from the outside world. An immersive turquoise bathroom mosaic adds to the dissolution between nature and designed structure, dousing the room in blue light reminiscent of a shallow sea. You can see more projects by the architecture studio on their website and Behance.

 

 



Design

A Geological Landmark’s Phosphorescent Glow Inspires the National Museum of Qatar’s Cavernous Gift Shop

April 25, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Patches of natural and artificial light highlight the curved layers of the National Museum of Qatar’s recently completed gift shop. The massive undulating walls were constructed from over 40,000 pieces of timber that tower high above visitors’ heads and imitate the shape and feeling of the Dahl Al Misfir or Cave of Light. The Qatar landmark is an underground formation that contains a wealth of gypsum deposits, which illuminate the cave with a phosphorescent glow and often form clusters of rose-shaped crystals known as “desert roses.”

Koichi Takada Architects wanted to connect visitors to the museum back to Qatari desert landscapes, while also creating a natural extension of the “Desert Rose” concept created for the museum by French architect Jean Nouvel. In addition to the museum shop, the architects also designed its restaurants, including the Desert Rose Cafe, Cafe 875, and Jiwan Restaurant. You can see more of the firm’s previous projects on their website and Instagram, and take a look at the museum’s exterior here. (via designboom)

 

 



Art Design

An Enormous Stylized Bird Sculpture Sprawls Atop a Mountain in India

April 24, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

A massive sculpture of a legendary bird has taken shape at Jatayu Earth’s Center in Kerala, India. Based on the epic story of Ramayana, Jatayu is a noble bird of divine origin who lost his wing and fell while fighting to protect a young woman named Sitha. The bird as recreated in concrete at the  Center is 200 feet long, 150 feet wide, and 70 feet tall, with stylized feathers and enormous curled claws. Its prone body is sprawled on a mountaintop with a 65 acre tourist destination campus.

Jatayu Earth’s Center is a collaboration between the Tourism Department of Kerala and renowned film director Rajiv Anchal and focuses on environmental sustainability in its design. The Center includes systems of rainwater irrigation, solar powered electricity, and planned organic farms. Learn more about visiting on the Jatayu Earth’s Center website. (via Design You Trust)

 

 

 



Design

Collected Rainwater Powers the World’s Tallest Indoor Waterfall at Singapore’s Jewel Changi Airport

April 16, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

A seven-story waterfall designed by Safdie Architects has become the shining focal point of Singapore’s Jewel Changi Airport. The 130-foot “Rain Vortex” is supplied by collected rainwater, and flows at the center of a greenhouse topped by an inverted glass dome. Nearly 10,000 gallons of water are pumped through the circular installation per minute from a centralized oculus in the middle of the space. The overhead dome is composed of a gridded glass thick enough to absorb any noise created by the aircrafts taking off and landing, and was tested to ensure it wouldn’t give off any distracting reflections to nearby air traffic controllers.

The new addition also includes five stories of shopping, a netted play area, and a terraced garden called the Shiseido Forest Valley that is dotted with smaller waterfalls accessed by trails. Although the waterfall at Jewel Changi Airport has just opened, it will soon be eclipsed as the tallest after the 2020 completion of a 164-feet-tall waterfall installed at Grimshaw‘s upcoming Qingdao Eden Project. (via dezeen)

 

 

 



Design

VTN Architects Designed a Vietnam Home With the Green Space on the Inside

March 24, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Images via Vo Trong Nghia Architects / Hiroyuki Oki

Blurring the line between the interior and exterior, Vo Trong Nghia Architects designed and built a three-level residential home in Ho Chi Minh City that is overflowing from within with fiddle leaf fig plants, various palms, and winding vines. Going beyond arrangements of potted house plants, the architects integrated the flora into the physical structure. Corridors, staircases, and rooms are lined with natural dividers that add color, block sunlight, and ventilate the space.

The latest project in the firm’s “House for Trees” series, the Stepping Park House is a commentary on environmental issues in Vietnam caused by a lack of green spaces. Views of the exterior show that the driveway, balconies, and perimeter fence have also sprouted leaves. The top floor of the building has an open slatted design with spaces that are filled with even more greenery, which further connects the home with the surrounding environment, and in particular to the rare park nearby. (via Jeroen Apers)