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Art

Mosaic Vermin Invade New York City as Part of Jim Bachor’s Latest Pothole Interventions

July 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Jim Bachor (previously) has been filling potholes with mosaics in Chicago and beyond for the last five years, combining his art practice with public service to create popsicles, flowers, and the Chicago city flag. The cheeky creations are one part beautification, one part nudge to city infrastructure, and are meant to exist in situ as both solution and artwork.

Bachor just returned from a trip to New York City where he installed five new mosaics as a part of his series Vermin of New York. All of the pieces—a dead rat, pigeon, cockroach, portrait of Donald Trump, and a bouquet of flowers—were installed in Brooklyn or Manhattan. “A lot of my work is pretty upbeat, so I try and be a little unpredictable to keep people of balance—hence the vermin,” Bachor tells Colossal.

Just days after installation his cockroach, portrait of Donald Trump, and bouquet were removed by the transportation department, something that has never happened to previous 67 installs. You can see the works that have managed to stay in the ground on his Instagram.

 

 



Art

Meticulous Acrylic Paintings by Shawn Huckins Erase Historic Works from the White House Art Collection

June 26, 2018

Andrew LaSane

“My Button Is Bigger Than Your Button” (Marquis De Lafayette, White House Art Collection Erasure No. 7)

At first glance, Colorado-based artist Shawn Huckins’ “Erasure” series looks like a collection of images that have been altered using a digital eraser tool to reveal the empty checkered pattern layer beneath. A closer look reveals that the works are actually meticulously detailed acrylic paintings, recreations selected from the White House Art Collection. Superimposed on the works are hand-painted erasure marks that serve as a commentary on the ideas of history, legacy, and whether or not those things can be wiped away in the present.

While the patterned marks range from measured and uniform to seemingly haphazard flourishes, for Huckins the resulting “obliteration” of history is the same. “The underlying works chosen for this series originally served as testaments of those who came before us and the indelible mark they left on the world, in a very short time, not so long ago,” the artist said in a statement. “In an era where the internet makes everyone a publisher, and digital editing tools bestow the power to create realities out of pixels, The Erasures forces us to examine our assumptions regarding the longevity of individual influence and institutions, thus raising enormous questions concerning the fragility of legacy.”

Huckins shares with Colossal that the collection of paintings are his “response to the current US administration’s policies and ethics surrounding a divisive country.” In his statement he poses several questions to the viewer about one person’s ability to “erase the impact of another,” whether or not longstanding ideals are more easily erased than recent progress, and how the events of today will be “recorded, judged and preserved when anyone can create, or re-create, his or her own reality with a keystroke, or a mouse-swipe, or a dead-of-night tweet?”

Shawn Huckins will debut 18 paintings from the Erasure series as a part of an upcoming solo exhibition titled Fool’s Gold, which opens at Modernism Gallery’s new space in San Francisco on July 11, 2018.

“Nothing Rhymes With Orange” (George Washington, White House Art Collection Erasure No. 5)

“If Only I Could Remember Your Name” (Mary Elizabeth Woodbury, White House Art Collection Erasure No. 8)

“The Most Beautiful Place Is Far From Here” (Rocky Mountain Scene, White House Art Collection Erasure No. 16)

“Loneliness Of Leaker” (John Adams, White House Art Collection Erasure No. 20)

“He Said. She Said. She Said.” (Julia Gardiner Tyler, White House Art Collection Erasure No. 18)

“Tell It Like It Was” (First Lady Caroline Harrison, White House Art Collection Erasure No. 3)

“Planet B” (Pastoral Landscape, White House Art Collection Erasure No. 6)

“Me, Myself, And Hypocrisy” (George Washington, White House Art Collection Erasure No. 13)

 

 



Art

‘Salt Years,’ Explores Sigalit Landau’s Lifetime Relationship With the Dead Sea

December 14, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Israeli artist Sigalit Landau (previously) has a practice that is deeply tied to working with the Dead Sea. Landau uses the hypersaline body of water as both a photographic backdrop and medium to suspend everyday objects, creating densely salt-encrusted sculptures. The items she chooses for her pieces are sometimes simply based on their textures and shapes, while others are chosen in order to filter memories that have been passed down to the artist through her parents and grandparents.

“These objects leave ‘the game’ of being useful ‘things’ and enter a new realm – the open space of representation,” said Landau to Colossal. “They loose their old features and dimensions and inhale a certain pureness of spirit, treated by climate and enhanced by emotion.”

A new book titled Salt Years, explores Landau’s process, bringing a new perspective to her salt crystal sculptures, video art, and images created over the last 15 years. Within the book Landau explores her process of “baptizing” objects in the Dead Sea’s waters, showcasing how the salt-filled sea breathes new life into the inanimate works through behind-the-scenes photos, and personal notes and essays.

You can pre-order the 288-page book through Landau’s Indiegogo campaign, and follow its progress through the book’s Facebook.

 

 



Art

An Embroidery of Voids: A Surreal Journey through Alleyways and Narrow Spaces by Daniel Crooks

March 17, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Trying to describe this short film by artist Daniel Crooks (previously) is a bit challenging, but once you start watching you’ll get the idea. Crooks filmed narrow passages, alleys, and other nooks and crannies that he stitched together into this seemingly infinite corridor. Make sure to turn up the volume or put on some headphones, Byron Scullin‘s sound design adds an entirely different dimension. The piece was originally commissioned by Silvia and Michael Kantor for the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

The video embedded here is courtesy Anna Schwartz Gallery, and you can watch a slightly higher resolution version on Vimeo. If you enjoyed this as much as I did, you’ll also want to watch Crooks’ A Garden of Parallel Paths. (via Booooooom)

 

 



Animation Art

Artist Erdal Enci Clones Himself to Create Elaborate Choreographed GIFs

August 4, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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It’s been over a year since we last checked in with video artist Erdal Inci (previously) who clones multiple recordings of himself moving through public spaces resulting in these bizarre looping performances. Inci often carries lights or other objects which lend a sense of choreography to each video, and at times the exposure eliminates him from the scene or makes him appear shadowlike in the background. Here are a few of our favorites over the last few months but you can see more on his website and at a higher resolution on Vimeo. (via iGNANT)

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Science

Timelapse of Dormant ‘Rose of Jericho’ Plants Exploding to Life After Exposure to Water

August 3, 2014

Christopher Jobson

The Rose of Jericho (Selaginella lepidophylla) is a species of desert moss that has the amazing ability to ‘resurrect’ itself after bouts of extreme dehydration lasting months or even years. After just a few hours of exposure to moisture the plants burst to life, uncurling from a tight ball of dry leaves to a green flower-like shape. Videographer Sean Steininger shot this timelapse of several plants as he exposed them to water. (via Cause, Science!)

Update: Apparently a few places sell these plants online.

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Art

This Is What Happens When You Attach a GoPro Camera to a Moving Car Wheel

July 28, 2014

Christopher Jobson

Though we may be rapidly heading toward peak GoPro, and the number of unique scenarios where the tiny video camera is used to film something is dwindling, gems like these still persist. For his Video Sketchbook class at the University of Wisconsin, Ryan Fox attached a camera to his car wheel while driving around at night, and this is the dizzying result. This should probably come with a list of seizure/vertigo/hypnotism warnings. (via Vimeo)

Update: Hey, if you liked this, also check out Paul Octavious’ photo series of spinning vinyl, Grandpa’s Records (scroll right).