bees

Posts tagged
with bees



Art

Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Yue

July 15, 2014

Christopher Jobson

bees-1

Artist and beekeeper Ren Yue employs bees in the construction of these amazing encapsulated sculptures. The artist first builds transparent polyhedrons and cubes with an inner framework of wooden dowels, at the center of which he places the queen. After introducing the rest of the hive, he then rotates the sculpture every seventh day based on the roll of a die, an act that he says references the biblical concept of creation. Not only does the dice roll create an element of randomness, but it also changes the effect of gravity, causing the bees to build in different directions resulting in more evenly dispersed forms.

While we’ve seen several artists using honeycomb as a medium such as Aganetha Dyck and Tomáš Libertiny, Ri seems to put slightly more emphasis on the beehive itself as being the primary form on display. You can see a few more photos over on his website. (via iGnant, Huffington Post)

bees-2

bees-3

bees-4

 

 



Art

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb

February 19, 2014

Christopher Jobson

bees-1

Photo by William Eakin

aganetha-more

Photos by William Eakin

In North America, Europe and many other parts of the world, bee populations have plummeted 30-50% due to colony collapse disorder, a fact not lost on artist Aganetha Dyck who for years has been working with the industrious insects to create delicate sculptures using porcelain figurines, shoes, sports equipment, and other objects left in specially designed apiaries. As the weeks and months pass the ordinary objects are slowly transformed with the bees’ wax honeycomb. It’s almost impossible to look at final pieces without smiling in wonder, imagining the unwitting bees toiling away on a piece of art. And yet it’s our own ignorance of humanity’s connection to bees and nature that Dyck calls into question, two completely different life forms whose fate is inextricably intertwined.

aganetha-4

aganetha-5

aganetha-6

aganetha-7

aganetha-1

aganetha-2

aganetha-3

aganetha-8

aganetha-9

aganetha-10

aganetha-11

aganetha-12

Born in Manitoba in 1937, the Canadian artist has long been interested in inter-species communication and her research has closely examined the the ramifications of honeybees disappearing from Earth. Working with the insects results in completely unexpected forms which can be surprising and even humorous. “They remind us that we and our constructions are temporary in relation to the lifespan of earth and the processes of nature,” comments curator Cathi Charles Wherry. “This raises ideas about our shared vulnerability, while at the same time elevating the ordinariness of our humanity.”

If you want to learn more I suggest watching the video above from the Confederation Centre of the Arts, and if you want to see her work up close Dyck opens an exhibition titled Honeybee Alterations at the Ottawa School of Art on March 3, 2014. A huge thanks to Gibson Gallery as well as Aganetha and Deborah Dyck for their help. All photos courtesy Peter Dyck and William Eakin.

 

 



Photography

Macro Bee Portraits by Sam Droege and the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

December 20, 2013

Christopher Jobson

bee-1

Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

bee-2

Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

bee-3

Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

bee-4

Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

bee-5

Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

bee-6

Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

bee-7

Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

bee-8

Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

bee-9

Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

bee-10

Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Sam Droege is the head of the USGS Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Program in Maryland, an organization that monitors the health and habitat of bees in the U.S. as well as creating archival reference catalogs that aid researchers in the identification of bee species in North America. The project is no small task as there are literally thousands of bee species in the U.S., some of which vary in only the most minute ways that may not even be distinguishable to the naked eye.

To aid in the identification process the USGS Bee Inventory relies on extremely high resolution photography, an initiative led by Droege that has been ongoing since 2010. Droege’s macro photos of bees are so clear and well executed that they practically pass as works of art in their own right. He shares with Flickr:

“When we started looking at these pictures, I just wanted to gaze at these shots for long periods of time,” Sam says. “I had seen these insects for many years, but the level of detail was incredible. The fact that everything was focused, the beauty and the arrangement of the insects themselves — the ratios of the eyes, the golden means, the french curves of the body, and the colors that would slide very naturally from one shade to another were just beautiful! It was the kind of thing that we could not achieve at the highest level of art.”

You can see many more of these bee portraits (as well as photos of other insects and even animals) over on Flickr. (via Daring Fireball, Flickr)

 

 



Design

Laura Zindel

February 4, 2011

Christopher Jobson

There’s nothing greater than when cool things appear in my inbox … hint, hint. Awesome bowls and plates by Laura Zindel, available at Blackbird. (thnx, jeff!)

 

 



Design Food

Bee Raw Honey

January 10, 2011

Christopher Jobson

In my day when you went to the grocery store there were only two types of honey: a big plastic bear with a yellow hat, or a small one. These days honey packaging and identity is undergoing a renaissance. From the minimalist, laboratory-inspired Ballard Bee Company to the very clever Sheffield Honey Company. But the beautiful honey flights shown above from Bee Raw in New York really take the cake for me. The packaging is almost as much art as it is function. Some of their stuff is currently out of stock, but the nine varietal and cheese flight are still available.

 

 



Photography

Urban Beekeeping in Vancouver

November 12, 2010

Christopher Jobson

One of my earliest memories in life is driving through the Texas hill country with my father to a bee supply store. I was maybe six and we’d spent the better part of a month constructing two beehives from scratch, painting them, nailing together frames, and wiring the wax sheets into place. On the way home it was my job to hold a small wooden box we’d just purchased that contained a queen bee and a few drones. At the store the man behind the counter said the queen could lay thousands of eggs in a day, a number I could hardly comprehend. So the entire hive, thousands of bees, gallons of honey, was all to come from this one tiny bee the size of a jelly bean. How awesome.

The photos above are taken by two guys in Vancouver who are keeping bees in the yard behind their home where it sounds like they may have been evicted. Curious if it was because of the bees? Many more photos on Behance.