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Design Food

A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr

November 6, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Photo © Lukas Schaller

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Photo © Lukas Schaller

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Photo © Lukas Schaller

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Photo © Lukas Schaller

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Photo © Lukas Schaller

Designed by Austrian architect Lukas Galehr for the recently-opened ‘Disco Volante’ pizzeria in Vienna, this fully-functional pizza oven has been designed to look like a gigantic reflective disco ball. And yes, it even rotates. Via Madame Mohr:

According to the clients wish the restaurant should not only carry the atmosphere of a southern Italian pizzeria but also transport the lightness of the “Italo-Disco” era of the 1970s and 80s.

The heart of every pizzeria is the wood fired oven which in this case is a giant disco ball with a rotating mechanism. After the dough is run out the Pizzaioli start the engine and the oven begins to slowly turn with about 1 revolution per minute.

You can see many more photos here and over on iGnant. Photos by Lukas Schaller. (via Dezeen)

 

 



Design History

This Programmable 6,000-Part Drawing Boy Automata is Arguably the First Computer and It Was Built 240 Years Ago

November 5, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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The Writer was built in the 1770s using 6,000 moving parts by Pierre Jaquet-Droz, his son Henri-Louis, and Jean-Frédéric Leschot

Designed in the late 1770s this incredible little robot called simply The Writer, was designed and built by Swiss-born watchmaker Pierre Jaquet-Droz with help from his son Henri-Louis, and Jean-Frédéric Leschot. Jaquet-Droz was one of the greatest automata designers to ever live and The Writer is considered his pièce de résistance. On the outside the device is deceptively simple. A small, barefoot boy perched at a wooden desk holding a quill, easily mistaken for a toy doll. But crammed inside is an engineering marvel: 6,000 custom made components work in concert to create a fully self-contained programmable writing machine that some consider to be the oldest example of a computer.

In my youth the “automata” of choice was either a Tomy Omnibot or a demonic Teddy Ruxpin, cheaply manufactured plastic robots, both which played cassette tapes and were destined to break within a few weeks (if you lost or broke the remote control to the Omnibot it was effectively useless). Not to suggest the machines above were mass-produced as children’s toys, but it’s amazing to think such incredibly crafted machines like the Writer and the Swan were built in the eighteenth century around the time of the American Revolutionary War, the age of James Cook, and the invention of the steam engine. (via Colossal Submissions)

In this clip from BBC Four’s documentary Mechanical Marvels: Clockwork Dreams hosted by Professor Simon Schaffer, we go behind the scenes to learn just how this remarkably complex 240-year-old device was designed and constructed. Here’s another bit about Merlin’s gorgeous silver swan automata:

Update: Some also argue that the 2,100-year-old Antikythera mechanism used to calculate astronomical positions is a contender for the first analog computer. (thnx, Elliot)

 

 



Photography Science

Animal Earth: New Photos Exploring the Diversity of the World's Most Obscure Species

October 29, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Segmentation, a distinguishing feature of the annelids is clearly visible here. Photo by Alexander Semenov.

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Nudibranchs, together with a huge variety of other marine mollusks, are commonly known as sea slugs (Coryphella polaris). Photo by Alexander Semenov.

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Many tube-dwelling polychaetes have elaborate, colorful tentacles for filter feeding and gas exchange. The funnel-shaped structure (operculum) seals the tube when the animal retreats inside (unidentified serpulid). Photo by Alexander Semenov.

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The compound eyes of a cynipid wasp (unidentified species). Some insects have simple eyes in addition to compound eyes, three of which can be seen on the top of this wasp’s head. Photo by Tomas Rak.

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The spherical test and impressive spines of a sea urchin. Coelopleurus floridanus. The mobile spines offer protection from predators. Since this species lives in relatively deep water, the purpose of the bright pigments in the skin and underlying skeleton is unknown. Photo by Arthur Anker.

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A jellyfish (Bougainvillia superciliris) with a hitchhiking amphipod (Hyperia galba). Photo by Alexander Semenov.

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In the cnidarians, what looks like a single individual is often a colony of polyps with specialized functions. In this floating colony (Porpita sp.) there are polyps for providing buoyancy, feeding (tentacles), digestion and reproduction. Photo by Arthur Anker.

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The colors and patterns of the sea slugs warn predators of their toxicity. This nudibranch is Chromodoris annulata. Photo by Arthur Anker.

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A sea angel, Clione limacine. In this image the grasping tentacles and chitinous hooks are retracted. Photo by Alexander Semenov.

We’ve all grown up learning about familiar animals like fish, tigers, elephants and bears, but this new book from Ross Piper takes the opposite approach: exploring the diversity in size, shape and color of the world’s most obscure and rarely seen organisms. With photography from Alexander Semenov, Arthur Anker, and other animal specialists and researchers, the 320-page Animal Earth promises to open your eyes to a variety of truly bizarre species from deepest oceans and the most adverse climates. The book is set to be published mid-November from Thames & Hudson.

 

 



Art Photography

The Impossible Geometry of Fanette Guilloud

October 9, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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This series of photos titled Géométrie de l’impossible (Impossible Geometry) from 21-year-old photographer Fanette Guilloud was created earlier this year in locations around Toulouse, Bordeaux and in the French Alps near Lyon. Guilloud employed a method of anamorphic projection similar to the work of Felice Varini to create the illusion of a painting superimposed on an image, when in fact there is no digital trickery whatsoever. The image is actually painted on numerous surfaces at varying depths and only appears like what you see here from a particular vantage point. (via Metafilter)

 

 



Art Dance Photography

Kylli Sparre's Surreal Conceptual Photography Influenced by Dance

October 8, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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After years of training to become a professional ballet dancer, artist Kylli Sparre realized it wasn’t the path for her and instead channeled passion for dance into photography and image manipulation. The influence of her past career is immediately apparent when viewing her conceptual photographs that depict posed figures, taunt with energy, at the peak of choreographed motion. You can follow her work over on Facebook, Flickr and prints are available by request. (via Fubiz)

 

 



Art

Ai Weiwei's Forever Bicycles Reconfigured Using 3,144 Bikes in Toronto

October 8, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Photo via Scotiabank Nuit Blanche

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Photo via Scotiabank Nuit Blanche

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Photo courtesy Ryan Davey

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Photo courtesy Ryan Davey

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Photo courtesy Ryan Davey

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Photo courtesy Ryan Davey

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Photo courtesy Ryan Davey

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Photo courtesy Ryan Davey

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Photo courtesy Ryan Davey

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Photo via Scotiabank Nuit Blanche

As part of Scotiabank Nuit Blanche in Toronto this weekend, an enormous reconfiguration of Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s Forever Bicycles (previously here and here) was unveiled in the center of Nathan Phillips Square. The installation dominates the outdoor space, measuring 100 feet long by 30 feet wide and consists of some 3,144 bicycles, resulting in so much depth and volume the piece almost appears blurred. Via Scotiabank Nuit Blanche:

World-renowned Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei will exhibit a new edition of his Forever Bicycles sculpture in Toronto’s Nathan Phillips Square. 3,144 interconnected bicycles will form a three-dimensional structure creating an incredible visual effect.

Yong Jiu, literally translated as “forever,” is the foremost bicycle brand in China; Ai re-interprets such everyday found objects in an abstract and symbolic way.

The sheer quantity of bikes and the diverse perceptions of viewing points create a colossal labyrinth-like, visually moving space, which represents the changing social environment in China and around the globe.

If you happen to be in Toronto the piece will be up through October 27, 2013. Many of the photos above courtesy Ryan Davey. (via My Modern Met)