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Art Craft Illustration

Delicate Pressed Fern Leaf Illustrations by Helen Ahpornsiri

March 27, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Artist and illustrator Helen Ahpornsiri creates incredible pressed fern illustrations from her studio in East Sussex. Tiny bits of stems and leaves are arranged on paper to create butterflies, dragonflies, and birds scarcely larger than a coin. Many of her pieces are available as prints on Etsy (along with a few originals), and you can also follow her on Instagram. (via The Kid Should See This)

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Craft Illustration

Old Books Transformed into Imaginative 3D Illustrations of Fairy Tale Scenes

March 25, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Seattle-based artist Isobelle Ouzman creates 3D illustrations from discarded books found in dumpsters, recycling bins, and local thrift stores. She adopts these forgotten books as a way to give them a second life, cutting and pasting the books into layered fairy tale scenes instead of letting the novels collect dust or fall prey to the elements.

Ouzman creates her whimsical and monochromatic environments with an X-Acto knife, glue, watercolors and Micron pens. Each work focuses on plants and animals, several layers of winding forestry surrounding her central characters.

Each book can take between two and three months to complete, which is why Ouzman is currently on hold with commissions until October. To submit a commission for her found book illustrations contact her here, or browse the books on her Etsy site. (via Lustik)

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Art Design

Unusually Beautiful Architectural Collages by Matthias Jung

March 23, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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German graphic artist Matthias Jung creates collages of fictional structures that seemingly turn the logic of architecture upside down. Buildings sprout mountains populated by livestock, homes hover in mid-air, and contrasting architectural styles are fused together in strangely harmonious ways like something straight out of a Terry Gilliam movie. You can see more of Jung’s work on his website where he also has a number of prints available. (via iGNANT)

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Art

Murals of Animals and Insects on the Streets of Antwerp by 'Dzia'

March 18, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Although he’s only been painting murals for less than three years, Belgian street artist Dzia has already established a distinctive style and an impressive body of work. The artist most frequently paints depictions of animals and insects in colorful patterns of lines that resemble something like a mosaic. Dzia recently collaborated with artist Gijs Vanee on a series of window pieces at Harmonie Park, and you can follow more his latest work on Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

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Collaboration with Gijs Vanhee

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Collaboration with Gijs Vanhee

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Art History Photography

Photographers Create Meticulously Faithful Dioramas of Iconic Photos

March 17, 2015

Johnny Waldman

Making of “The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

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“The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

It all started with a joke—a rather ironic challenge, if you will, to recreate the world’s most expensive photograph: Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II. Because for commercial photographers Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger, that meant tolling away in their spare time when money wasn’t coming in to recreate a photograph that had just sold for $4.3 million. This was the beginning of Ikonen, an ambitious project to meticulously recreate iconic historical scenes in miniature. The ongoing project includes immediately recognizable shots—the Wright Brothers taking flight, the Lock Ness Monster poking its head out, “Tank Man” halting tanks during the Tiananmen Square protests—because the images have been seared into our collective memory.

“Every field has its icons, guiding stars, which reflect the spirit of time in form, media and content,” says the photographers. And when something is photographed, it has a way of transcending time rather than becoming isolated. Historical symbolism is fluid and our perception of it can change the same way history can. This, perhaps, is why Cortis and Sonderegger pull away from their miniature scene at the very end, revealing what each photograph actually is: paper, cotton balls, plastic and plenty of their own spare time. Photos shared with permission from the artists. (via Wired)

Making of “Nessie” (by Marmaduke Wetherell, 1934)

Making of “Five Soldiers Silhouette at the Battle of Broodseinde” (by Ernest Brooks, 1917)

Making of “Tiananmen” (by Stuart Franklin, 1989)

Making of “AS11-40-5878” (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)

“AS11-40-5878” (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)

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Making of “Lakehurst” (by Sam Shere, 1937)

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Making of “The last photo of the Titanic afloat” (by Francis Browne, 1912)

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“The last photo of the Titanic afloat” (by Francis Browne, 1912)

Making of “La cour du dumaine du Gras” (by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, 1826)

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“La cour du dumaine du Gras” (by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, 1826)

 

 



Art Design

Shylights: Beautiful Unfolding Kinetic Lights That Bloom like Flowers

March 16, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Several types of flowers are known to open and close for reasons of defense or energy conservation. This evolutionary mechanism, called nyctinasty, inspired Studio DRIFT to design the Shylight, a kinetic light fixture that opens dramatically during a 30 foot (9 meter) fall. The motion mimics the same action of a blooming flower or the billowing of a parachute. A collection of Shylights were just permanently installed at Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, and you can see them in action in the video above. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)