books

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Photography

The Robot Book by Thomas Jackson

February 27, 2011

Christopher Jobson

The Robot Book is the latest creation from Brooklyn-based artist and photographer Thomas Jackson (previously). It’s actually the culmination of a larger photo project he completed last year which follows dreamlike story of a lone robot in a post-apocalyptic future, carrying on the day-to-day menial tasks of life. The book is constructed from sheet metal, salvaged wood, and is embedded with an antenna (!) and other electrical components. It contains 24 giclée-printed photographs and 7 giclée-printed illustrations by Jackson.

When I began this project three years ago, I didn’t know I was making a book. The plan was to create a series of staged photographs addressing a set of themes that interested me, among them our culture’s obsession with hard work and our less-than-harmonious relationship with the natural world. Composed in narrative form, in the manner of a medieval tapestry or altarpiece, the pictures would tell the story of a solitary robot’s last days in a post-apocalyptic place. But when I completed the images in late 2010, the project felt unfinished. The story seemed to need one last narrative twist. The answer, I came to realize, was a book. A book that was itself an artifact from the world I’d created in the pictures. A combination of organic, manufactured and mechanical components, it would be the sort of thing the robot himself might have made. The result is a mixed media mash-up that’s part sculpture, part graphic novel, part photo book and part gadget—an inscrutable relic long lost in an apocryphal future.

If you’re interested in obtaining a copy (a limited edition of 11) you can contact the artist directly via his web site.

 

 



Design Illustration

The Unruly Alphabet

January 24, 2011

Christopher Jobson

The Unruly Alphabet, deftly illustrated by Aaron McKinney. This strikes me as a book that childless people with a great sense of humor would purchase and gift to their nieces and nephews, who would then execute to a T, everything depicted within the book on their parents after one reading. Or maybe that’s just my kid.

 

 



Art Science

Julia Feld

January 19, 2011

Christopher Jobson

There’s been no shortage of book and paper sculpture in this space lately but I’m making no apologies. St. Louis-based scientist and artist (scientist! and artist!) Julia Feld makes delicately layered sculptures and topographies from dissected science and medical textbooks. Many are available through her shop, Holy Stokes.

 

 



Art Design

Isaac Salazar: Read

January 15, 2011

Christopher Jobson

My kingdom to find out who is responsible for creating this. Seriously, anyone? Once an image like this hits Tumblr it’s hopeless. (via room seven

Update: This is the work of Isaac Salazar. More here. (thnx, Jill)

 

 



Art

Between the Lines

January 15, 2011

Christopher Jobson

“Between the Lines” is a 2007 piece by artist Ariana Boussard-Reifel. The book is a white supremacist screed that Ariana eviscerated, word by word. I contacted Ariana by email and this is what she said about the piece:

Between the Lines was completed in 2007. It is a white supremacist text that I cut every word out of. Essentially imposing the doctrine of color-based segregation on the book itself, removing all the black from the white, and rendering it meaningless as a consequence. It was part of a series that was a response to the rise in power of The World Church of the Creator, a vitriolic white supremacist group. Also in the body of work is Like Mother Like Daughter, a performance piece and now a group of photographs that I made with my mother, and Hate Begins at Home, an installation piece in which LMLD is projected.

Learn more about her other works via her website.

 

 



Art

Just in Time: Xavier Antin's chain-linked printers

January 12, 2011

Christopher Jobson

London-based artist Xavier Antin devised this beautifully orchestrated printing process to create his book “Just in Time, or A Short History of Production”. While I don’t think the paper was physically fed through all four printers at once, each printer was responsible for a color plate starting with an 1880 stencil duplicator printing magenta and ending with 1976 inkjet printer for yellow. (via beautiful decay)