ceramics

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Art

Fresco-Inspired Porcelain Bowls Formed From Balloons by Guy Van Leemput

August 30, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Ceramicist and mathematician Guy Van Leemput forms textured bowls by drafting interlocking lines, abnormally shaped circles, and other designs on the surface of balloons. The artist begins by adding a porcelain stamp to the bottom of his rubber mold and then working his way in a circular motion upward. Although his designs are geometrically inspired, he creates each piece based on intuition rather than a pre-determined template. When finished, the pots are so translucent they appear as if they were formed from paper. This aesthetic, both in the works’ color and technique, was inspired by ancient Italian fresco paintings, and has been a part of his practice since 2014.

Currently Van Leemput’s work is included in the Porcelain Biennale at the Albrechtsburg Castle in Meissen, Germany, the city where European porcelain was first composed. The exhibition opened earlier this month and runs through November 4, 2018. You can take a look inside the artist’s studio and handbuilt kiln in a video made for the Dutch ceramics magazine de kleine K below. (via Art is a Way)

 

 



Art

Pixelated Ceramics by Toshiya Masuda Bring a Tactile Experience to Digital Images

August 28, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese artist Toshiya Masuda builds pixelated objects out of clay, piecing together sculptural tennis shoes, fried eggs, and baseballs that look as if they have been pulled directly from a video game. By designing his works to appear digital, Masuda provides a physical quality to computer or television-based images. The combination of ceramics and digitized objects allows the artist to blur the line between what is real and virtual, an increasingly common experience in our present age. You can learn more about his studio practice in the video by Keiko Art International below. (via Kottke)

 

 



Art Craft

Coral-Inspired Vessels Formed From Thousands of Individually-Applied Porcelain Fragments by Olivia Walker

August 8, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

London and Barcelona-based ceramicist Olivia Walker produces works in porcelain that address the ideas of growth and decay through additive and subtractive processes. After creating her initial shape on a potter’s wheel, Walker attaches thousands of individually-applied fragments that appear like organic growths. “I start from a set point on a bowl, and let these organic accretions spread out and grow – eating through, or growing over the form beneath,” she explains. “These make reference to organisms – fungus, coral, and bacteria – but are unidentifiable.”

Walker’s vessels are currently a part of the New Member Showcase at CAA Gallery in London through August 31, 2018. She will also be showing her sculptures at the British Craft Pavilion as a part of the London Design Festival from September 20-23, 2018. You can see more of her porcelain works on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Comical Combinations of Ceramic Animals Form Surreal New Figurines

June 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Debra Broz cleverly fuses found ceramic figurines to create comical new animals. From high-fiving horses to boxers with parrot wings, her work exists in the space where familiar and surreal meet. The artist shares with Colossal, “As I look for pieces that match in scale I’m brainstorming: What makes this funny? What makes this strange? How subtle or extreme does an alteration have to be to make someone notice?”

Broz also works as a ceramics restorer, and her professional training and experience gives her the tools to create these seamless amalgamations without making molds or fully recreating the component torsos, heads, and limbs. The Los Angeles-based artist describes her mixed influences of mythology and biology:

I play on the idea of the “mad scientist”, cutting things apart and forming them into something else, like Dr. Moreau or Dr. Frankenstein, but I often find my initial inspiration in the biological world. Some pretty amazing mutations, anomalies and unusual traits have been found in animals over history. “Freaks” have always amazed, but also amused and often frightened people – they are a source of mythology and folklore that is pervasive.

Upcoming projects include a book, scheduled for 2019, and new figurines that branch out to include different materials. You can stay up to date on Broz’s work and see behind-the-scenes on her Instagram. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art

New Contemplative Female Busts Cast from Porcelain, Polymer Gypsum, and Resin by Gosia

May 9, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Toronto-based sculptor Gosia (previously) constructs minimally-hued porcelain busts of contemplative female forms from a variety of materials, including ceramic, polymer gypsum, resin, and most recently, porcelain. Her very first experiment with the new medium is included in her current solo exhibition, Beneath the Surface, at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia. The work is an imperfect cast, a mistake which Gosia details in the text below.

Imperfect is one of those ‘happy accident’ pieces,” she explains. “My intention for it was completely different, but when it came out of the mold it had an indentation on the left side of the face… It made me think a lot about the world’s obsession (and my own) with perfection and what we might be missing because of it. It felt good to let go of control and for once let my art do its own thing.”

Other new works include Overflow, which features a female figure inside of an elongated cube. The subject’s long hair flows into the pedestal’s depths—a structure that seems to at once support and swallow the imbedded figure. Two other pieces are each titled Beneath the Surface, and were created with the combination of opaque and lucid materials. Translucent resin composes the bottom the sculptures’ faces to their nose, making it appear as if each have dipped partially underwater.

“Beneath the Surface” runs through June 16 at Paradigm Gallery. Gosia’s first European show, “The Windows of the Soul,” opened this past weekend at Dorothy Circus in London. You can see more of Gosia’s work on her website and Instagram.

"Overflow"

“Overflow”

“Beneath the Surface”

"Beneath the Surface"

“Beneath the Surface”

“Moon”

"Imperfect"

“Imperfect”

 

 



Art

Miniature Workshops Constructed Inside Ceramic Vessels by Jedediah Voltz

May 1, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Miniature-builder and ceramicist Jedediah Corwyn Voltz constructs tiny homes, studios, and workshops perched within or around domestic objects. Previously we’ve covered his mini treehouses—impressive structures that scale succulents and other common houseplants with the support of petite scaffolding. Recently the artist has combined two of his preferred mediums, building small-scale interior scenes in the cross-section of his handmade ceramic vessels.

The multi-piece sculptures feature workbenches, complex machinery, crystals, and telescopes which peer from the top of the converted pots. These miniature workshops will be exhibited in the group show Bad Ass Miniatures: … Causing a Little Trouble at D. Thomas Fine Miniatures in Yonkers, New York from May 5 through July 22. You can view more of the Los Angeles-based artist’s ceramic works and tiny houseplant homes on his Instagram and Big Cartel.

 

    

 

 



Art

Slinky Spirals of Clay Form Topsy-Turvy Vases by Michael Boroniec

April 27, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Michael Boroniec subverts the age-old conception of pots and vases as useful vessels of containment with his sculptural ceramics. The artist began his spiral motif in 2008 with a focus on teapots, and the style has since become the predominant theme of his body of work. Boroniec forms each vessel on his potter’s wheel, and then carefully slices through the still-soft clay to deconstruct the traditional shape. He describes his intention behind these deconstructions in a recent Instagram post:

This process reveals aspects of the vase that most rarely encounter. Within the walls, maker’s marks become evident and contribute to the texture. The resultant ribbon effect, reminiscent of a wheel trimming, lends fragility, elegance, and motion to a medium generally perceived as hard and heavy. This emphasizes a resistance of gravity, allowing negative space to unravel and become part of the form.

Boroniec studied at the Rhode Island School of Design and now lives and works in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. He is represented by Lyons Wier Gallery, where his work is on view in a group exhibition through April 28, 2018. You can see more of his work on tumblr and InstagramMark Cantin and Cat Burt also directed and produced a short film about Boroniec, which you can view below.