city

Posts tagged
with city



Art

Split Screen: A Love Story

June 28, 2011

Christopher Jobson

A new short by JW Griffiths shot entirely with a mobile phone. The editing to match up each shot is simply impeccable. (via vimeo)

 

 



Design

Floating Chicago

May 24, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Using time-lapse footage of the Chicago skyline shot over several years Craig Shimala (previously) has created another one of his superb mirrored videos. It’s fascinating how this simple editing trick turns the cold city skyline into a hovering, monolithic spacecraft.

 

 



Art

Cradle by Ball-Nogues Studio

May 23, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Cradle is a sculpture installed on the exterior wall of a parking lot in Santa Monica, California by Ball-Nogues Studio, originally designed by Frank Gehry.

An aggregation of mirror polished stainless steel spheres, the sculpture functions structurally like an enormous Newton’s Cradle – the ubiquitous toy found on the desktops of corporate executives in Hollywood films. Each ball is suspended by a cable from a point on the wall and locked in position by a combination of gravity and neighboring balls. The whole array reflects distorted images of passersby.

I’d pay a nickel to watch this piece from afar during an earthquake. (via journal du design, contemporist)

 

 



Design

Maxime Ansiau: Skyscraper Plates

April 18, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Amsterdam-based artist Maxime Ansiau creates enormous conjoined dishes printed with the repetitive patterns of buildings.

 

 



Art Design

Census Maps Using Word Frequency From 19 Million Dating Website Profiles

March 31, 2011

Christopher Jobson


Chicago area

Each decade the United States government embarks on a census of its entire population in order to update population numbers and demographic information that aids in the allocation of Congressional seats, electoral votes, and government program funding. But as helpful and interesting as this data is, what does it really tell us about who we are? What about our likes, dislikes, feelings, and the ways we choose to define ourselves? In his project A More Perfect Union, artist R. Luke Dubois asked this very question and set out to answer it by joining 21 dating web sites and aggregating language used in the profiles of 19 million people. The data was then organized to create dozens of insanely detailed city and state maps that tell a wonderfully rich story about who we are, or at least, who we claim to be. Via his artist statement:

To join a dating site you have to, quite literally, “put yourself out there”, describing yourself for the express purpose of being liked. This seemingly simple act is quite complex. You have to provide, in addition to some basic statistics, two pieces of prose: you have to say who you are, and you have to say who you want to be with. In the second piece of writing, you have to tell the truth. In the first, you have to lie.

I joined twenty-one dating sites in order to make my own census of the United States in 2010. These are my findings: a road atlas of the United States, with the names of cities, towns, and neighborhoods replaced with the words people use to describe themselves and those they want to be with.

These maps contain 20,262 unique words, based on the analysis of online dating profiles from 19,095,414 single Americans.

Below are some examples of maps where locations are substituted with words people used to describe themselves. Click any image for more detail.


Central Texas


California


Michigan

DuBois also used the data to generate heatmaps helping to draw comparisons between specific terms county by county.


“Bored” (male vs. female)


“Lonely” (male vs. female)


“Sexy” (male vs. female)


“Naughty” versus “Nice”


“Conservative” versus “Liberal”

A More Perfect Union was shown at bitforms gallery in New York earlier this year. Take a deep dive into the maps Dubois created at his website, and check out a short video about the project. (thnx, leif!)

 

 



Illustration Photography

Giacomo Costa: Post Natural

March 30, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Incredible apocalyptic urban landscapes from Italian artist Giacomo Costa who lives and works in Florence. His latest exhibition, Post Natural, can be seen at Galerie Voss in Düsseldorf starting April 1.

 

 



Design Food

Street Map Cutting Board is Both Functional and Gruesome

March 23, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Just saw this new item pop up at my favorite Icelandic design shop, Birkiland. The Nordurmyrin by 7-9-13 Design Group is a meat cutting board designed to mimic the streets of an actual neighborhood in east Reykjavik.

Nordurmyrin is a meat cutting- and serving board. It draws its name from a neighbourhood in the old east of Reykjavik. Its street names are named after renowned characters in the old icelandic sagas: Landnama, Laxdaela and Njala. These are examples of the street names: Audargata, Gudrunargata, Gunnarsbraut and Skarphedinsgata. When meat is cut on the board the blood juices rush down the streets. It refers to the conflicts that arose in the societies of the second and third generations of Icelandic settlers.

The blood juices run down the streets?! Excuse me while I put on my Bill the Butcher costume and whip out the credit card, this cutting board is the most gruesomely awesome kitchen implement of 2011.