clothing

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Craft

New Custom-Embroidered Pets in Pockets by Hiroko Kubota

August 30, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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What started in 2013 as a quirky attempt to immortalize famous internet cats on clothes by embroidery artist Hiroko Kubota, has now transformed into a full-fledged custom clothing line where people can request embroideries of their favorite pets on her own brand of shirts, Go!Go!5. The project began when she was making handmade clothes for her young son who asked if a cat could make an appearance on his shirt. Kubota’s shirts quickly went just as viral as the famous cats she embroidered peeking out of pockets, and soon she was taking requests. She’s since embroidered hundreds of cats and dogs for happy customers around the world. You can make your own request via Etsy.

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Art Photography

A 19th Century Dress Submerged in the Dead Sea Becomes Gradually Crystallized with Salt

August 24, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Salt Crystal Bride Gown III, 2014. Sigalit Landau & Marlborough Contemporary.

Israeli artist Sigalit Landau‘s love affair with the Dead Sea stretches back decades, having grown up on a hill that overlooks both the Judean desert and the northern part of this hypersaline lake that is among the saltiest on Earth. In her artistic practice she utilizes the lake both as a backdrop—one of her most iconic artworks involves a video portrait of herself floating in the lake with an unraveling string of 500 watermelons—as well as a means to produce sculptural objects encrusted with thick layers of salt. Sigalit has created salt sculptures of violins, bicycles, boots, and fishing nets covered in carnallite crystals.

Her latest photographic work titled Salt Bride takes us several meters underwater to view the gradual crystallization of a 19th century dress weighted to the floor of the Dead Sea. The dress was inspired by S. Ansky’s famous play The Dybbuk about a young woman possessed by an evil spirit. From Marlborough Contemporary:

Written by S. Ansky between 1913 and 1916, The Dybbuk tells the story of a young bride possessed by an evil spirit and subsequently exorcised. In Landau’s Salt Bride series, Leah’s black garb is transformed underwater as salt crystals gradually adhere to the fabric. Over time, the sea’s alchemy transforms the plain garment from a symbol associated with death and madness into the wedding dress it was always intended to be.

To achieve the photographs, Landau collaborated with photographer Yotam From who had to wear over 150 pounds of weight just to submerge himself in the harsh saline water. The final installation incorporates a series of 8 life-size photographs currently on view at Marlborough Contemporary in London through September 3, 2016. You can read more about the exhibition on Artsy. (via My Modern Met)

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Salt Crystal Bride Gown III, 2014. Sigalit Landau & Marlborough Contemporary.

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Installation view at Marlborough Contemporary.

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Salt Crystal Bride Gown III, 2014. Sigalit Landau & Marlborough Contemporary.

 

 



Art Design

Outfits Sourced From German Public Transportation Fabric by Menja Stevenson

August 10, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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“Bustour S (Stuttgart public bus)” (2006), all images © Menja Stevenson

Like most that read this article, German artist Menja Stevenson has had her fair share of rides in city buses and trains, each of which has forced her (and you) to sit on top of garishly designed uniform seating. The fabric, as investigated by this article on the BBC, is not only made to outlast spills and stains, but also trends, as many of the painfully drab designs can last a decade or more.

Interested in this accident-resistant material, Stevenson began sourcing and creating outfits out of the fabric in 2006 for her project Bustour. The project forced her to persuade German transportation companies to personally ship her the fabric, as they are not commercially available. After finally obtaining the material she designed clothes that aesthetically camouflaged herself within each bus or train interior matching the fabric, capturing the reaction of fellow passengers.

“Wearing them, you sweat like crazy, they feel like a knight’s armor and it’s hard to act naturally,” said Stevenson. “I couldn’t believe that many people didn’t realize the connection seeing me and the seats together. Did they think that it was sheer coincidence? Some curious people at least talked to me, and a very few laughed, but most passengers would look shyly at me and quickly look the other way again.”

You can see archived documentation of these reactions (or lack there of) on Stevenson’s website. If you’re searching for a slightly more practical use for old transportation fabric take a look at the bags and accessories made from airplane seat fabric by Fallen Furniture (previously). (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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“Bustour M (Münster public bus)” (2015)

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“Public Pattern / Bustouren” (2006)

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“Bustour S (Stuttgart Metro)” (2008)

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“Bustour B (Bielefeld public bus)” (2015)

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“Bustour RW (Rottweil public bus)” (2010)

 

 



Design

Pirate Printers: Shirts and Totes Printed Directly on Urban Utility Covers

July 26, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Using public street fixtures as printing elements, the artist collective behind Berlin-based Raubdruckerin (pirate printer) produces shirts and bags imprinted with manhole covers, vents, and utility grates. The overlooked geometric patterns and typographic forms of urban signage make surprisingly nifty graphics for shirts. The collective applies ink directly to the streets and prints on-site in locations like Amsterdam, Lisbon, and Paris and then sell their creations through an online shop. It would be amazing to see something like this come out of Japan. (via Quipsologies)

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Art Photography

Photographer Spends 20 Years Documenting How We All Dress Exactly Alike

December 22, 2014

Johnny Waldman

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For the last 20 years, unassuming Dutch photographer Hans Eijkelboom has traversed the world, picking a spot, be it in Shanghai, New York, or Paris, and meticulously photographed what he saw. “I take between 1 and 80 photographs a day, almost every day, 12 months a year,” he says, referring to his “Photo Notes” project, which has now been turned into a book titled People of the Twenty-First Century. The “Photographic Journal,” published by PHAIDON, is the largest, most comprehensive work of his to date, and includes thousands of photos that, together, create a fascinating picture of mankind.

The “anti-sartorial” photographs of everyday people capture specific visual themes – people in red jackets, men with bare chests on roller blades – that are grouped together with the date, city and time range they were taken. And this combination and repetition is what makes the photographs so powerful. Viewed separately, they would hardly even catch our eye.

“I don’t use this diary to show what happens in my life but as a method of visualizing the development of my world view,” writes the artist. Much like the way stalagmites form in caves over hundreds of years, Eijkelboom’s landscape is the result of a methodical fixation to the banality of everyday life. Hans Eijkelboom’s People of the Twenty-First Century is available for around $26 (Via Citylab)

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Art

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson

March 29, 2014

Johnny Waldman

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These lightweight, airy dresses look like they’re about to be adorned to a fancy gala or dinner party. But as irony would have it, they will never be worn. In fact, the dresses are actually made from Carrera Marble, the same material as the world’s most famous naked statue – Michelangelo’s David. Starting out as a solid mass of marble that can weigh several tons, they are chiseled and sculpted down by Alasdair Thomson, a sculptor living and working in Edinburgh, Scotland.

His latest work, “The Identity Collection,” (named as if it’s a fashion line) explores “the way fabric hangs and folds, and is attempting to capture that lightness and gracefulness in stone.” Effectively ceding control over his subjects, Alasdair asked his friends and family to donate garments, which he then impeccably recreated out of marble. You can see more of Alasdair’s work on his website or his Instagram account.

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