color

Posts tagged
with color



Art

Muralist Elian Chali Envelopes Building Facades in Enormous Abstract Fields of Color

November 5, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Argentinian artist Elian Chali, who goes by just his first name professionally, creates vibrant murals that balance a simple aesthetic with carefully calculated designs. Elian often incorporates anamorphic shapes into his murals, placing squiggles and squares at the corners of buildings, creating the illusion of floating patterns. Clean lines and flat color fields almost seem to be rendered digitally rather than laboriously hand-painted across hundreds or even thousands of square feet. In addition to his mural projects, the self-taught artist creates smaller gallery-ready paintings and prints, and also works as a freelance curator. Follow along with Elian’s latest projects on Instagram. (via Street Art News)

 

 



Animation

Squirming Multi-Colored Bodies Dance Across the Screen in an Unsettling Animation by Mike Pelletier

August 8, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Flurry” is a bizarre new animated short from the experimental artist Mike Pelletier. The two minute-long video features no obvious narrative. Rather, the animation is an exploration of movement and volume: an indeterminate number of humanoid figures seem to merge and divide as their flaccid limbs wiggle and squirm. Pelletier is Canadian and now based in Amsterdam. In a statement, the artist shares that “his work explores the various ways in which the human body is represented in art and the social milieu”. Watch more of Pelletier’s experiments on Vimeo (especially this deflated fruit animation) on Vimeo. Digital editions of the artist’s work are available in his online store.

 

 



Art

Rainbow-Streaked Interventions by Elsa Tomkowiak Add Intrigue to Covered Bridges and Lakes

August 5, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Elsa Tomkowiak creates color-focused installations that divide the rainbow into designs that span bridges, light-filled corridors, and large-scale sculptures on water. Tomkowiak’s work is currently exhibited as a part of the second edition of Annecy Paysages in southeastern France. For the outdoor exhibition, Tomkowiak arranged six 15-foot spheres along Lake Annecy which visitors can glance at from the Albigny promenade through September 15, 2019. You can see more of her colorful interventions both indoors and out on Instagram.

 

 

 

 



Art

The Vibrant Blue Hues of Morocco’s Chefchaouen Village Captured in Photographs by Tiago & Tania

July 14, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Photography duo Tania De Pascalis and Tiago Marques, known as Tiago & Tania, spent six days capturing the blue-tinted stone architecture of Chefchaouen, a 550-year-old village located in the mountains of Morocco. The photo series presents an interesting juxtaposition of everyday life within a fairytale-like aesthetic created by the town’s trademark cerulean walls, which have earned it the nickname “Blue Pearl.”

The lines and curves of the buildings and alleyways are visually augmented as the saturated blues contrast with the surrounding Earth tones, colorful textiles, and the people who move through the town. There are several theories about the history of the blue pigments used to color the walls of the Chefchaouen, which was founded as a refugee camp. According to Atlas Obscura, the refugees painted their homes blue according to Jewish traditions to mimic the sky and as a reminder of “God’s power above.”

Early on in the project, Tiago & Tania were met with some resistance from the town’s inhabitants, some of whom did not want their photos taken. “We experienced a unique challenge in Chechaouen, never encountered in any other location,” they told Colossal. “It was the contrast between our role as photographers and citizens… We decided to change our approach method, making nearly imperceptible our presence and focusing on the sense of hearing to [capture] the right moment. This method allowed us to connect to the hearth of the city, living his timings and moments, realizing the photographic series that gave life to the project of Chefchaouen.”

To see more of this and other series by Tiago & Tania, follow them on Instagram (here and here) and take yourself on a virtual journey around the world via their website.

 

 



Art

Light Shines Through a Rainbow-Tinted Geometric Panel Installation by Art Duo Luftwerk

June 9, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Photographs: John Faier and Peter Tsai, courtesy of Luftwerk

Chicago-based art duo Luftwerk recently opened a site-specific exhibition titled Parallel Perspectives inside of the McCormick House, the Elmhurst Art Museum’s contemporary art center and historic house designed by Mies van der Rohe. Petra Bachmaier and Sean Gallero installed acrylic panels, RGB LEDs, and diffusers that interact with the light in the space to create a kaleidoscope of colors and geometric shapes that respond to Mies’ architecture.

The McCormick House was designed with modularity in mind so that duplicates of the structure could be built in other locations. The plate glass walls are where prospective owners could flex their individuality by taking advantage of various color tint options. Luftwerk began the design process by moving the tinted surface idea to the interior. The conceptual pieces fill the space with blues, yellows, reds, greens, and other layered hues, which change as the light and color alter perspective.

Parallel Perspectives is a step in our own direction using his basic philosophies,” Luftwerk said in a statement. “This exhibition combines ideas of Johannes Itten’s color theory and the basic concepts of the Bauhaus: with the geometry of a square as a prevalent form and playing with one-point perspective and 90-degree angles. It has given us an opportunity to elaborate on the ideas of Mies and develop them into our own shape and format.”

Parallel Perspectives is on view at the McCormick House now through August 25, 2019. To see more of Luftwerk’s continued exploration of light and color, follow the duo on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Textural Installations by Shoplifter Immerse Visitors in Furry Neon Caves

June 7, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Icelandic artist Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir, who goes by Shoplifter, cites her primary medium as hair. But rather than working with the expected range of browns and blondes that naturally grow on humans and animals, Shoplifter uses a range of hair that seems to draw its color palette from Muppets. Neon yellows and pinks, deep blues, and vivid greens commingle in massive installations that coat gallery walls, floors, and ceilings. Shoplifter’s immersive works often create cave-like spaces where visitors explore around, under, and through her textural worlds.

Shoplifter, whose moniker stems from a stranger’s mishearing of her given name, cites themes of vanity, self-image, fashion, beauty and popular myth as inspiration for her work. In an interview with artnet, she shared, “It started out with my fascination with humans and the things we mass produce for obscure reasons. Hair extensions are trying to beautify yourself and be unique. I noticed that layering the hair together and having it flow around created a very painterly tapestry feeling.”

Shoplifter exhibits widely and most recently showcased her work as Iceland’s representative to the  the Venice Biennale. Her solo show Nervescape VIII is also on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma in Helsinki, Finland through September 15, 2019. Explore more of Shoplifter’s work on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art Craft

Globs of Color and Texture Ooze Off Brian Rochefort’s Ceramic Sculptures

February 24, 2019

Andrew LaSane

All images: Brian Rochefort

Los-Angeles based mixed media sculptor Brian Rochefort uses ceramic and glazes to create one-of-a-kind vessels covered in abstract patterns and textured blobs. Unfired clay objects are broken apart, built upon with more material, then fired between each layer of glaze to produce volcanic masses or craters, overflowing with color and character.

The surfaces of the sculptures are a blend of rough, uneven clumps and smooth, bubbly drips, all suspended in place by the kiln firing. Solid vibrant chunks flow over previously laid gradients while cracked exteriors peek from beneath translucent splatters. The final forms are a colorful reflection of the process, which makes each close-up image that Rochefort shares on Instagram feel like a different piece.

Following a recent solo exhibition at Van Doren Waxter Gallery in New York, Rochefort is gearing up for a two-person show with artist Jackie Saccoccio at Adrian Rosenfeld Gallery in San Francisco this May.

Installation view at Van Doren Waxter Gallery