color

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Art Craft

Globs of Color and Texture Ooze Off Brian Rochefort’s Ceramic Sculptures

February 24, 2019

Andrew LaSane

All images: Brian Rochefort

Los-Angeles based mixed media sculptor Brian Rochefort uses ceramic and glazes to create one-of-a-kind vessels covered in abstract patterns and textured blobs. Unfired clay objects are broken apart, built upon with more material, then fired between each layer of glaze to produce volcanic masses or craters, overflowing with color and character.

The surfaces of the sculptures are a blend of rough, uneven clumps and smooth, bubbly drips, all suspended in place by the kiln firing. Solid vibrant chunks flow over previously laid gradients while cracked exteriors peek from beneath translucent splatters. The final forms are a colorful reflection of the process, which makes each close-up image that Rochefort shares on Instagram feel like a different piece.

Following a recent solo exhibition at Van Doren Waxter Gallery in New York, Rochefort is gearing up for a two-person show with artist Jackie Saccoccio at Adrian Rosenfeld Gallery in San Francisco this May.

Installation view at Van Doren Waxter Gallery

 

 



Art

Overlapping Jewel-Toned Fabrics Fill the Nave of a Former Italian Church in a New Installation by Quintessenz

February 8, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Thomas Granseuer and Tomislav Topic, known as the art duo Quintessenz (previously), recently completed a new hanging fabric installation at CARME, an arts center located inside a former church in Brescia, Italy. Despite the numerous indoor and outdoor locations the pair have installed their signature semi-transparent fabrics, Carme Genesis is the first time they’ve worked within the architecture of a church. Due to the piece’s position at the center of the nave, guests can walk parallel to the hanging work, or cross directly underneath on the building’s first floor. Each perspective presents a new layering of colors, bringing a shifting dimensionality to the collection of flat, hanging textiles. Carme Genesis runs through March 3, 2019. You can see more of Quintessenz’s installations on their website and Instagram.

 

 



Photography

A New Book Reveals a Colorful Side to Vivian Maier’s Renowned Street Photography

November 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Location and date unknown. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location and date unknown. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Nanny and self-taught photographer Vivian Maier (1926–2009) (previously here and here) kept nearly 150,000 photographic images, including street photography and self-portraits, hidden from the world until an estate sale in 2007 revealed a large bulk of her secretive hobby. Since 2010 her photographs have been widely exhibited in galleries and museums across the world, and were the subject of the 2013 documentary Finding Vivian Maier, which was nominated for an Academy Award.

Although her mostly Chicago and New York-based photographs have become infamous in the decade since their discovery, her color images have been less prevalent due to the technical challenges involved in their development and recovery. This month the largest monograph of her full-color photographs was published by Harper Collins, which includes images pulled from the roughly 40,000 Ektachrome color slides spanning the last 30 years of her life. Vivian Maier: The Color Work explores over 150 of her colorful images with details that have been gathered about her story and photographic process. The book also features a forward by photographer Joel Meyerowitz and text by Colin Westerbeck, a former curator of photography at the Art Institute of Chicago.

“Maier was a self-invented polymath of a photographer,” writes Westerbeck in the book. “The one advantage Maier gained from keeping her photography to herself was an exemption from contradiction and condescension. She didn’t have to worry about either the orthodoxy or the approval of her peers.”

Vivian Maier: The Color Work was created in partnership with Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York City, who will be presenting an exhibition of the same title opening November 14, 2018 and running through January 5, 2019. Several of the color photographs included in the exhibition will be presented for the first time. You can see more of Maier’s black and white and color photography on this portfolio site dedicated to her collection, and you can purchase a copy of the new book on Amazon. (via Chicago Magazine)

Self-portrait, Chicago, February 1976. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, Chicago, February 1976. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location unknown, May 1958. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location unknown, May 1958. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location and date unknown. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location and date unknown. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

New York City, 1959. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

New York City, 1959. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location unknown, 1960. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location unknown, 1960. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Chicago, 1962. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Chicago, 1962. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location and date unknown. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location and date unknown. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, Chicagoland, October 1975. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, Chicagoland, October 1975. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Chicagoland, 1975. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Chicagoland, 1975. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, Chicago, January 1979. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, Chicago, January 1979. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, 1975. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, 1975. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

From Vivian Maier: The Color Work, by Colin Westerbeck. Copyright © 2018. Images reproduced here with permission from Harper Design, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers

From Vivian Maier: The Color Work, by Colin Westerbeck. Copyright © 2018. Images reproduced here with permission from Harper Design, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers

 

 



Design Illustration

Technicolor Tattoos Mix Psychedelic Graphics with Memphis-Inspired Patterns

October 30, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Oregon-based tattoo artist Dave, a.k.a. Winston the Whale, uses a wide spectrum of colors in his trippy tattoos. The works merge a 60s aesthetics with inspirations from Scandinavian folk art to Memphis design. Traditional floral and vine motifs border prismatic mouths and starry-eyed bats, while other pieces focus more on an 80s appeal with graphic grids and squiggly yellow lines. You can see more psychedelic compositions and brightly colored animals on Dave’s Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Nigerian Hair Culture Documented in Rainbow-Hued Portraits by Medina Dugger

August 9, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Purple Kinky Calabar. All photographs © Medina Dugger

Lagos-based photographer Medina Dugger documents colorful hair culture in the coastal Nigerian city with her ongoing series Chroma. The collection of portraits pays homage to J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere, a renowned African photographer who documented women’s hairstyles in Nigeria for over 50 years, starting in the mid-20th century.

Prior to decolinization, Dugger explains, wigs and straightening had replaced much of the indigenous hair culture, and ‘Okhai Ojeikere’s documentations sought to celebrate traditional hairdos. She continues, “African hair braiding methods date back thousands of years and Nigerian hair culture is a rich and often extensive process which begins in childhood. The methods and variations have been influenced by social/cultural patterns, historical events and globalization. Hairdos range from being purely decorative to conveying deeper, more symbolic understandings, revealing social status, age and tribal/family traditions.”

While ‘Okhai Ojeikere’ images were in black and white, Dugger updates the documentary style with brightly colored backgrounds, a diverse array of vibrant contemporary fashion, and rainbow hues integrated into the hairstyles with thread, beads, and dyed extensions. You can see more of Dugger’s colorful editorial photography on her website and Instagram.

Blue Coiling Penny Penny

Blue Beri Beri

Golden Eggs

Left: Purple Irun Kiko / Right: Pink Buns

Yellow Tip Twist

Emerald Abebe

Aqua Suku

Left: Violet Irun Kiko / Right: Yellow Monocle

Pink Didi with Cowry Shell

Blue Star Koroba

Calabar Bun Trio

 

 



Art

Dizzying Scrolls of Hand-Colored Paper Form Bas-Relief Sculptures by Hadieh Shafie

July 27, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Hadieh Shafie uses carefully hand-dyed and rolled paper to form dense surfaces. In some works, each set of concentric circles is an equal depth, creating small planes in the topography of the finished piece. Her ‘Spike’ series features sharp spiraled cones that protrude toward the viewer. In addition to the colorful edging, calligraphy is also incorporated on the paper scrolls. Most recently, Shafie has been adding an additional dimension by dipping the finished scrolls into ink to create the appearance of shadows. The artist describes her process in an artist statement:

On the surface, what the viewer sees are the fore-edges of miniature scrolls made of strips of paper. Using a limited color palette, each strip of paper is dyed with acrylic pigments, and then rolled by hand, one upon another, to create a multitude of color combinations for each emerging scroll. The rolling process places razor thin edges of color closely together, creating a space for the viewer’s eye to blend adjoining colors.

Shafie was born in Tehran, Iran and is currently based in Brooklyn. The artist shares with Colossal that her work is “a visual response to the emancipating effect [of] books and poetry” that she has experienced. Shafie holds two MFA degrees and her work is in collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), and the Brooklyn Museum of Art, among others. You can see more of her intricate paper work on her website and Instagram. (via #WOMENSART)

 

 



Art

Colorful Installations of Spray Paint and Mesh Form Connections Between the Analog and Digital Worlds

July 23, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018), all images courtesy of Quintessenz

Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018), all images courtesy of Quintessenz

Hanover and Berlin-based art duo Quintessenz recently completed a large-scale installation for the newly funded Paxos Contemporary Art Project, which is currently taking place on the island of Paxos in the Adriatic sea. Although designed to be appreciated and enjoyed in person, the images of their intervention created inside of a 400-year-old ruin are quickly becoming viral due to the work’s strong contrast against the historic setting.

With roots in both graffiti and chromatics, Thomas Granseuer and Tomislav Topic of Quintessenz combine aspects of spray paint, textiles, installation, and the digital image in their work. Their large site-specific works and facade murals often uses shape as the main inspiration, while also borrowing aesthetic elements found on location.

The duo transform spaces into frameworks for presenting their abstract creations and challenging the spectator’s perception. These ideas are present in their recent installation Flickering Lights, which was was created for Fashion Week Berlin back in January 2018, and Pardis Perdus installed in Les Baux-de-Provence, France in 2017.  In both of those installations, and their latest piece in Paxos, the artists use dyed or spray painted fabric in a range of layers as a way to interact with light conditions and points of view. The one-ton construction Flickering Lights was suspended in a large hall of Panorama Berlin from over 32,000 square feet of fabric and dyed with over 200 gallons of paint.

Similar to the Paradis Perdus piece, their latest intervention in Greece used the architectural structure to emphasize the effect of their creation. Like digital abstract images somehow transferring into the real world, both these pieces employ color shades and different size layers to create depth and perspective illusion. Appearing bigger and smaller depending on the observer’s movement, they leave room for individual experiences of these interfaces between analog and digital worlds. Although exceptionally photogenic, the artists’ idea is to enjoy these works in person. “We hope that the visitors of our work leave their mobile phone cameras in their pockets for a moment and simply enjoy the light and the translation of the wind in the material,” Quintessenz explains.

Paxos Contemporary Art Project runs through September 9, 2018. You can see more of Quintessenz’s installations on their website and Instagram.

Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)

Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)

Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)

Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)

Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)

Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)

"Paradis Perdus" (2017), Les Baux-de-Provence, France

“Paradis Perdus” (2017), Les Baux-de-Provence, France

"Paradis Perdus" (2017), Les Baux-de-Provence, France

“Paradis Perdus” (2017), Les Baux-de-Provence, France

"Paradis Perdus" (2017), Les Baux-de-Provence, France

“Paradis Perdus” (2017), Les Baux-de-Provence, France

"Flickering Lights" (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin

“Flickering Lights” (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin

"Flickering Lights" (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin

“Flickering Lights” (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin

"Flickering Lights" (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin

“Flickering Lights” (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin