Copenhagen

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Craft Design

Copenhagen’s Distinct Architecture Knit into Color-Blocked Urban Landscapes by Jake Henzler

April 16, 2020

Anna Marks

All images © Jake Henzler, shared with permission

Instead of writing or illustrating a journal to record his excursions, Sydney-based artist Jake Henzler knits colorful memories of urban landscapes into huge pieces of art. The artist goes by the name of “‘Boy Knits World”’ on Instagram and crafts quilt-like panels of urban spaces that he comes across whilst traveling. 

Henzler lived in Copenhagen for a year, and during that time, he created an original hand-knitted blanket panel called “‘Copenhagen Building Blocks.” The large work celebrates the traditional, world-recognized architecture of Denmark’s capital. As a whole, the piece is made up of a series of six grid-like patterns, which Henzler has sewn together to form a larger piece. Each of the architectural blocks is named after a different district in the city and features Nørrebro Studios, Østerbro Studios, Hellerup Apartments, Nyhavn Hotel, Nørreport Offices, and Frederiksberg Apartments. 

In Copenhagen, much of the traditional architecture’s brick and woodwork is painted, and the diversity of colors throughout the city creates a strong sense of place. This architectural distinctiveness is illustrated throughout Henzler’s work, and each block comprises the traditional colors, framework, and patterns featured throughout the city’s vibrant districts.

To view more of Henzler’s work, visit his Instagram, and to buy the “Copenhagen Building Block” pattern, visit his Ravelry page. (via Lustik)

 

 



Design

Roof of a Copenhagen Power Plant Doubles as Snow-Free Ski and Snowboarding Center

February 26, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Copenhill

Danish architectural firm BIG recently transformed what would be another underutilized industrial space into a year-round entertainment hub as part of Copenhagen’s plan to be carbon-neutral by 2025. Copenhill, which opened in October of 2019, is situated on top of the waste-to-energy power plant, the Amager Resource Centre, in the Danish capital. Offering snow-free skiing and snowboarding, the outdoor space also allows hiking and running on its trails that border the 41,000-square-meter area. It even boasts the world’s largest climbing wall reaching 80 meters high.

The power plant can convert as many as 440,000 tons of waste into energy and heat for the hundreds of thousands of the city’s homes every year. Each machine is arranged by height, pushing the multi-use site to 90 meters at its peak.

 

 



Art

Friendly Giants Built From Recycled Wood Hidden in the Forests of Copenhagen

May 3, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Danish artist Thomas Dambo works on large-scale sculptures with recycled materials, having completed 25 wooden works around the world in just under three years. His latest project, The Six Forgotten Giants, is based in his hometown of Copenhagen, a project that builds and hides friendly giants throughout the city’s forests. Using a treasure map, visitors can find the oversized creatures, each of which comes with a poem that describes a bit of their personality.

All of the giants are produced from recycled wood, material that was gathered by Dambo and his team from 600 pallets, a shed, an old fence, and various other sources. Using local volunteers to build the works, Dambo then names each sculpture after one of the builders, such as Teddy Friendly seen below. You can see more images of the oversized sculptures on Dambo’s website. (via Bored Panda)

 

 



Art

Temporary Light Etchings on the Streets of Copenhagen by Asbjørn Skou

October 15, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Artist Asbjørn Skou lives and works in Copenhagen where he creates all matter of prints, drawings, and occasionally public light installations. The images above are from a 2010 series called Markeringer where the artist projected a collection etchings at the Sjaeloer railway station. To me it looks almost as is the drawings have been etched into the building’s surface causing the light from the inside to creep through. See much more from this installation here. (via ruines humaines)