device

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Art

Water Light Graffiti: A Moisture-Sensitive Surface Embedded with LEDs Creates Illuminated Art

August 8, 2012

Christopher Jobson

For the past few weeks artist Antonin Fourneau has been working at the Digitalarti Artlab in Paris creating what’s being called his Water Light Graffiti system. The device utilizes a giant matrix of LEDs embedded in a moisture-sensitive panel that when exposed to water causes the lights inside to instantly illuminate. The fun thing is that almost anything becomes a temporary paintbrush: a wet hand, a squirt gun, a paintbrush or even an atomizer. Water Light Graffiti was recently put on display in Poitiers, France and you can watch the video above to see it in use, and here’s a short clip (in French) of Fourneau showing how the entire thing was constructed. Many more photos here.

 

 



Art

A Multi-Colored Sprinkler Paints On-demand Rainbows

July 31, 2012

Christopher Jobson


Photo © Edwin Deen


Photo © Edwin Deen


Photo © Edwin Deen


Photo © Niels Post


Photo © Ampelhaus

Have a blank white room in need of an instant color treatment? Consider this glorious rainbow sprinkler by Netherlands-based artist Edwin Deen. Using some color pigment, an electric tap, a few meters of hose and a plain garden sprinkler, Deen transformed a simple garden sprinkler into a smile-inducing artistic device. I have the sudden urge to put on a white painter’s uniform and start prancing through this thing. The rainbow sprinkler will be on display at BARRY at the W in Amsterdam starting August 30th. All images courtesy the artist. And if you like this, also check out the Robo Rainbow. (via my amp goes to 11)

 

 



Design

The Augmented Reality Sandbox

May 6, 2012

Christopher Jobson

While I truly appreciate the need for any kid to get dirty in a sandbox or let their imagination run wild in a field of mud puddles (something I was doing myself only an hour ago), I love to see how technology like a Kinect 3D camera can create new interactive environments and games. Case in point this new augmented reality sandbox designed by Oliver Kreylos out of U.C. Davis that projects a real-time colored topographic map complete with contour lines onto the surface of the sand while you manipulate it. The system even allows you to pour virtual water on your creation and interact with it in real time. It’s not hard to imagine switching the entire system to volcano mode, or using the projection in some sort of three dimensional toy battlefield. Gah!

According to Krelos’ YouTube page, the project was funded by the National Science Foundation with the hopes of installing these systems as exhibits at science museums like the Lawrence Hall of Science or the Tahoe Environmental Research Center. See another demo of this 21st century sandbox here. (via reddit)

 

 



Music

House of the Rising Sun Covered by Legacy Computer Equipment

February 12, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Although this has been making the rounds here and there it’s taken me a few weeks to actually sit down and appreciate this cover of The Animals House of the Rising Sun covered entirely using audio samples recorded from legacy computer equipment and diagnostic machines. The piece uses four primary “instruments” including an HP Scanjet 3P, an Atari 800XL with an EiCO Oscilloscope as the organ, a Texas instrument Ti-99/4A with a Tektronix Oscilloscope as the guitar and a hard-drive powered by a PiC16F84A microcontroller as the bass drum and cymbal. Video and music by PURETUNE.

Update: Here’s a similar video done three years ago by James Houston, covering Radiohead. (thnx, stephen!)

 

 



Art Design

The Chromatic Typewriter Types in Color

December 4, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Washington-based painter Tyree Callahan modified a 1937 Underwood Standard typewriter, replacing the letters and keys with color pads and hued labels to create a functional “painting” device called the Chromatic Typewriter. Callahan submitted the beautiful typewriter as part of the 2012 West Prize competition, an annual art prize that’s determined by popular vote. I don’t know how practical painting an image with a color typewriter is, but if it is, Keira Rathbone can do it.

 

 



Design

Keaton Music Typewriter

October 17, 2011

Christopher Jobson

File this under archaic devices I had no idea existed. Here’s a once in a lifetime opportunity to own a mint-condition Keaton Music Typewriter. Patented in the early 1930s, there are only a dozen or so in existence. What does it do? Exactly what you think it does. Via musicprintinghistory.org:

The Keaton Music Typewriter was first patented in 1936 (14 keys) by Robert H. Keaton from San Francisco, California. Another patent was taken out in 1953 (33 keys) which included improvements to the machine. The machine types on a sheet of paper lying flat under the typing mechanism. There are several Keaton music typewriters thought to be in existence in museums and private collections. It was marketed in the 1950s and sold for around $225. The typewriter made it easier for publishers, educators, and other musicians to produce music copies in quantity. Composers, however, preferred to write the music out by hand.

Pick it up today for $6,000 at Jack’s Red Barn. (via neatorama)