digital

Posts tagged
with digital



Illustration Photography

The Surreal Collages of Joseba Elorza

November 14, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Joseba Elorza is a sound technician who makes a living with his unique brand of digital collage and illustration. The Spain-based artist blends humor, technology, science fiction and anonymous historical photography to create some really splendid digital imagery. You can see much more in his portfolio, and pickup prints in his shop. (via iGNANT)

 

 



Art Photography

Surreal Photo Manipulations by Caras Ionut

November 3, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Photo artist Caras Ionut lives in the world of Photoshop where he digitally assembles surreal landscapes and portraits using largely his own photography. These are some of my favorites but you can see much more over on 500px. Ionut also offers all kinds of tutorials and workshops available through his website. (via So Super Awesome)

 

 



Art

Bizarre New Animated Gifs from Zach Dougherty

October 15, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Digital artist Zach Dougherty (previously) is back with a new round if really strange animated gifs, placing his strange amorphous and glitchy objects against ordinary backdrops. Let’s file this under “I don’t know what it is but I like it.” (via Ignant)

 

 



Amazing Art

Box: A Groundbreaking Demonstration at the Intersection of Robotics, Projection-Mapping, and Software

September 24, 2013

Christopher Jobson

Produced by Bot and Dolly, a San Francisco-based design and engineering studio, this amazing clip was filmed entirely in camera and demonstrates a mixture of robotically controlled monitors, projection-mapping and choreographed human interaction. Via their website:

“Box” explores the synthesis of real and digital space through projection-mapping on moving surfaces. The short film documents a live performance, captured entirely in camera. Bot & Dolly produced this work to serve as both an artistic statement and technical demonstration. It is the culmination of multiple technologies, including large scale robotics, projection mapping, and software engineering. We believe this methodology has tremendous potential to radically transform theatrical presentations, and define new genres of expression.

I can’t tell you how long it’s been since I’ve been excited by projection mapping, even if you’re skeptical this is seriously worth just a few minutes of your time. (thnx, Nick)

Update: Here’s a short behind the scenes clip.

 

 



Art

Full Turn: 3D Light Sculptures Created from Rotating Flat Screen Monitors at High Speed

September 22, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Full Turn is a kinetic light sculpture by Benjamin Muzzin created as a diploma project for his bachelor degree at ECAL. The piece was constructed from two flat screen monitors placed back-to-back and spun at extremely high speed resulting in three-dimensional light forms that hover in thin air. Of the work he says:

With this project I wanted to explore the notion of the third dimension, with the desire to try to get out of the usual frame of a flat screen. For this, my work mainly consisted in exploring and experimenting a different device for displaying images, trying to give animations volume in space. The resulting machine works with the rotation of two screens placed back to back, creating a three-dimensional animated sequence that can be seen at 360 degrees. Due to the persistence of vision, the shapes that appear on the screen turn into kinetic light sculptures.

Music by Montgomery Clunk. (via Prosthetic Knowledge, Creative Applications)

 

 



Art

Timelapse of the Imperceptible Effects of Aging Created from Family Portraits by Anthony Cerniello

September 9, 2013

Christopher Jobson

Editor’s note: Watch the whole thing. With sound. Don’t skip around. Just let it play, or else you’re missing out.

Aging is fascinating thing to document in film and photography, from Noah Kalina’s 12+ year portrait a day project to Diego Goldberg’s family portrait series that began in 1976, it’s interesting to see how many different approaches there are. This new clip titled Danielle from filmmaker Anthony Cerniello tries something I’ve never seen before and packs an amazing punch.

Last Thanksgiving, Cerniello traveled to his friend Danielle’s family reunion and with still photographer Keith Sirchio shot portraits of her youngest cousins through to her oldest relatives with a Hasselblad medium format camera. Then began the process of scanning each photo with a drum scanner at the U.N. in New York, at which point he carefully edited the photos to select the family members that had the most similar bone structure. Next he brought on animators Nathan Meier and Edmund Earle who worked in After Effects and 3D Studio Max to morph and animate the still photos to make them lifelike as possible. Finally, Nuke (a kind of 3D visual effects software) artist George Cuddy was brought on to smooth out some small details like the eyes and hair.

The final result is pretty remarkable, if a little bizarre. Not quite out of the uncanny valley, and yet pause the movie at any moment and it feels like you’re looking at a plain portrait. While it plays the transitions are just slow enough that you’re only vaguely aware anything is happening. It’s amazing as it is weird. He tells me via email:

I wanted to make a person, I felt like I could tell a story with that, but it ended up feeling slightly robotic, like an android. I’m OK with that. Things never come out the exact way you plan them, but that’s the fun. The score I imagined would tell this woman’s life, with events speeding by as she aged, but in the end I thought it would be more interesting to go with an abstract piece of sound, and my friend Mark Reveley really came through because I love how it sounds.

Cerniello normally edits commercials and music videos for the likes of 30 Seconds to Mars and Kings of Leon, you can see much more of his work over on his website.