dioramas

Posts tagged
with dioramas



Art History Photography

Photographers Create Meticulously Faithful Dioramas of Iconic Photos

March 17, 2015

Johnny Waldman

Making of “The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

wright

“The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

It all started with a joke—a rather ironic challenge, if you will, to recreate the world’s most expensive photograph: Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II. Because for commercial photographers Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger, that meant tolling away in their spare time when money wasn’t coming in to recreate a photograph that had just sold for $4.3 million. This was the beginning of Ikonen, an ambitious project to meticulously recreate iconic historical scenes in miniature. The ongoing project includes immediately recognizable shots—the Wright Brothers taking flight, the Lock Ness Monster poking its head out, “Tank Man” halting tanks during the Tiananmen Square protests—because the images have been seared into our collective memory.

“Every field has its icons, guiding stars, which reflect the spirit of time in form, media and content,” says the photographers. And when something is photographed, it has a way of transcending time rather than becoming isolated. Historical symbolism is fluid and our perception of it can change the same way history can. This, perhaps, is why Cortis and Sonderegger pull away from their miniature scene at the very end, revealing what each photograph actually is: paper, cotton balls, plastic and plenty of their own spare time. Photos shared with permission from the artists. (via Wired)

Making of “Nessie” (by Marmaduke Wetherell, 1934)

Making of “Five Soldiers Silhouette at the Battle of Broodseinde” (by Ernest Brooks, 1917)

Making of “Tiananmen” (by Stuart Franklin, 1989)

Making of “AS11-40-5878” (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)

“AS11-40-5878” (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)

Hindenburg

Making of “Lakehurst” (by Sam Shere, 1937)

Titanic

Making of “The last photo of the Titanic afloat” (by Francis Browne, 1912)

titanic

“The last photo of the Titanic afloat” (by Francis Browne, 1912)

Making of “La cour du dumaine du Gras” (by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, 1826)

domaine

“La cour du dumaine du Gras” (by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, 1826)

 

 



Art

Unexpected Scenes Hidden Inside Tiny Jewelry Boxes by Talwst

March 13, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

first
First Flakes of Winter; Mixed Media 2010; 9″ x 2″ x 2.5″

Started From The Bottom Now We Here pt2 Mixed Media 2013 9" x 2" x 2.5"

Started From The Bottom Now We Here pt2; Mixed Media 2013; 9″ x 2″ x 2.5″

Banksy Is Your Gran Mixed Media, 3volt filament bulb 2015 2.25" x 2" x 2.5"

Banksy Is Your Gran; Mixed Media, 3volt filament bulb 2015; 2.25″ x 2″ x 2.5″

El Torero Mixed Media 2013 4" x 4" x 4.5"

El Torero; Mixed Media 2013; 4″ x 4″ x 4.5″

Summer in the Winter Mixed Media 2013 3" x 2" x 2.5"

Summer in the Winter; Mixed Media 2013; 3″ x 2″ x 2.5″

Frolic Mixed Media 2013 3" x 2" x 2.5"

Frolic; Mixed Media 2013; 3″ x 2″ x 2.5″

The Troubadour II Mixed Media 2014 1" x 1" x 1.5"

The Troubadour II; Mixed Media 2014; 1″ x 1″ x 1.5″

Der Stuhl. Die Puppe. Das Entartete. Das Genie Mixed Media 2013 2.5" x 3" x 3.25"

Der Stuhl. Die Puppe. Das Entartete. Das Genie; Mixed Media 2013; 2.5″ x 3″ x 3.25″

Ornate jewelry boxes set the stage for tiny painted scenes filled with nearly-microscopic human figurines. The boxes are meticulously crafted by Canadian-Trinidadian artist Talwst, who uses mixed media to explore the narrative of art history in combination with elements of contrasting cultures. Although his vintage boxes may cast an ancient light on the scene, the boxes encapsulate a present day cultural commentary through their arrangements.

Talwst works out of his studio in Toronto, Ontario and has a solo exhibition at the Art Gallery of Mississauga through April 12th. TALWST will also be collaborating with VICE magazine this year to produce a body of work that will appear on newsstands this September. (via BOOOOOOOM)

 

 



Art

Toy Mammals and Dinosaurs Burdened with Miniature Civilizations by Maico Akiba

August 26, 2014

Christopher Jobson

maicoakiba01

Created by artist Maico Akiba, these lumbering toy mammals, dinosaurs, and reptiles carry the burden of miniature worlds that seem to have sprouted from their backs. Akiba uses model making materials commonly used for train sets to build each scene which appear post-apocalyptic in nature. Johnny at Spoon & Tamago keenly observes that, in a way, they resemble a reverse Noah’s Ark. The project is titled SEKAI (Japanese for “world”), and you can see more here. (via Spoon & Tamago)

maicoakiba02

maicoakiba09

maicoakiba05

maicoakiba06

maicoakiba10

maicoakiba08

maicoakiba11

 

 



Animation

Papercraft Dioramas Come to Life with Projected Animations by Davy and Kristin McGuire

May 19, 2014

Christopher Jobson

In an fascinating mix of papercraft, set design, and animation, artist duo Davy and Kristin McGuire bring stories to life inside these exquisitely built paper dioramas. With the aid of digital projection mapping the pair have created several theatrical installations including The Hunter and Psycho which netted the Samuel Beckett Theatre Trust Award and subsequently lead to The Paper Architect. You can see more of their work on their website, and on Vimeo. (via Laughing Squid)

paper-1

paper-2

paper-3

paper-4

paper-5

paper-6

paper-7

 

 



Art

Secrets and Tragedy Abound Inside Thomas Doyle’s Ominous Dioramas

March 31, 2014

Christopher Jobson

doyle-new-1

doyle-new-2

doyle-new-3

doyle-new-4

thomas-3

thomas-1

thomas-12

Using models and materials originally built for the backdrop of model train sets, artist Thomas Doyle (previously) creates miniature dioramas with huge implications. Quaint scenes from suburbia are smashed into smithereens, characters are caught mid-homicide, and the front lines of military conflicts weave through mountains of consumer detritus. Cool Hunting recently sat down with the New York-based artist to learn more about the narratives behind his work, the interpretation of which he leaves entirely up to the viewer.

Doyle currently has work on view at the Torrance Art Museum through May, and will appear in an upcoming Thames & Hudson book, Big Art / Small Art. (via Cool Hunting)

 

 



Art Illustration

Illuminated Cut Paper Light Boxes by Hari & Deepti

March 20, 2014

Christopher Jobson

001

Deepti Nair and Harikrishnan Panicker (known collectively as Hari & Deepti) are an artist couple who create paper cut light boxes. Each diorama is made from layers of cut watercolor paper placed inside a shadow box and is lit from behind with flexible LED light strips. The small visual narratives depicted in each work often play off aspects of light including stars, flames, fireflies, and planets.
The couple shares about their work:

Paper is brutal in its simplicity as a medium. It demands the attention of the artist while it provides the softness they need to mold it into something beautiful. It is playful, light, colorless and colorful. It is minimal and intricate. It reflects light, creates depth and illusions in a way that it takes the artist through a journey with limitless possibilities.

What amazes us about the paper cut light boxes is the dichotomy of the piece in its lit and unlit state, the contrast is so stark that it has this mystical effect on the viewers.

Hari & Deepti are originally from India but now live and work in Denver. Their work most recently appeared at SCOPE New York through Black Book Gallery. (via Hi-Fructose, My Modern Met)

003

sub

004

002

004

003

001

008

paper

paper-2

boxes

deepti-2

 

 



Art

Carcass: A Scale Replica of a Fast Food Kitchen Carved Entirely from Wood by Roxy Paine

February 5, 2014

Christopher Jobson

carcas-1

Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-2

Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-3

Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-4

Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-5

Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-6

Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-7

Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-8

Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-9

Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

When first viewing this large diorama by Roxy Paine, you’re struck by the paradox of what you think you should be seeing and what is actually in front of you. It’s clear this is an expertly executed replica of a fast food restaurant counter complete with order screens, straw dispensers and a soft-serve ice cream machine; but devoid of flashy logos, food, or any other visual cues whatsoever, all that seems to remain is an empty shell—a carcass—carved entirely from birch and maple wood.

Titled Carcass, the installation was one of two large-scale dioramas on view at Kavi Gupta Gallery as part of Paine’s first solo show in Chicago, Apparatus. Via the gallery:

With Apparatus, Roxy Paine introduces a new chapter in his work, a series of large scale dioramas. Inspired by spaces and environments designed to be activated via human interaction, a fast-food restaurant and a control room, the dioramas present spaces and objects which are hand carved from birch and maple wood and formed from steel, encased and frozen in time, void of human presence, making their inherent function obsolete. Rooted in the Greek language, diorama translates to “through that which is seen”, a definition that has evolved throughout time as dioramas became conventionally known as physical windowed and encased rooms used as educational tools. Paine transforms the environments on display by using the diorama’s traditional experience as a tool to create a contemplative experience where what we see behind the glass transitions between being real and being a mere shell of something real.

The additional installation, Control Room (shown in the video above), similarly depicts an extraordinarily detailed collection of switches and knobs, a control center with an unknown function. You can learn more about both pieces over at Kavi Gupta. All photos by Joseph Rynkiewicz, courtesy the gallery.