dioramas

Posts tagged
with dioramas



Animation

Papercraft Dioramas Come to Life with Projected Animations by Davy and Kristin McGuire

May 19, 2014

Christopher Jobson

In an fascinating mix of papercraft, set design, and animation, artist duo Davy and Kristin McGuire bring stories to life inside these exquisitely built paper dioramas. With the aid of digital projection mapping the pair have created several theatrical installations including The Hunter and Psycho which netted the Samuel Beckett Theatre Trust Award and subsequently lead to The Paper Architect. You can see more of their work on their website, and on Vimeo. (via Laughing Squid)

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Art

Secrets and Tragedy Abound Inside Thomas Doyle's Ominous Dioramas

March 31, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Using models and materials originally built for the backdrop of model train sets, artist Thomas Doyle (previously) creates miniature dioramas with huge implications. Quaint scenes from suburbia are smashed into smithereens, characters are caught mid-homicide, and the front lines of military conflicts weave through mountains of consumer detritus. Cool Hunting recently sat down with the New York-based artist to learn more about the narratives behind his work, the interpretation of which he leaves entirely up to the viewer.

Doyle currently has work on view at the Torrance Art Museum through May, and will appear in an upcoming Thames & Hudson book, Big Art / Small Art. (via Cool Hunting)

 

 



Art Illustration

Illuminated Cut Paper Light Boxes by Hari & Deepti

March 20, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Deepti Nair and Harikrishnan Panicker (known collectively as Hari & Deepti) are an artist couple who create paper cut light boxes. Each diorama is made from layers of cut watercolor paper placed inside a shadow box and is lit from behind with flexible LED light strips. The small visual narratives depicted in each work often play off aspects of light including stars, flames, fireflies, and planets.
The couple shares about their work:

Paper is brutal in its simplicity as a medium. It demands the attention of the artist while it provides the softness they need to mold it into something beautiful. It is playful, light, colorless and colorful. It is minimal and intricate. It reflects light, creates depth and illusions in a way that it takes the artist through a journey with limitless possibilities.

What amazes us about the paper cut light boxes is the dichotomy of the piece in its lit and unlit state, the contrast is so stark that it has this mystical effect on the viewers.

Hari & Deepti are originally from India but now live and work in Denver. Their work most recently appeared at SCOPE New York through Black Book Gallery. (via Hi-Fructose, My Modern Met)

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Art

Carcass: A Scale Replica of a Fast Food Kitchen Carved Entirely from Wood by Roxy Paine

February 5, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

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Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

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Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

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Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

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Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

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Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

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Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

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Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

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Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

When first viewing this large diorama by Roxy Paine, you’re struck by the paradox of what you think you should be seeing and what is actually in front of you. It’s clear this is an expertly executed replica of a fast food restaurant counter complete with order screens, straw dispensers and a soft-serve ice cream machine; but devoid of flashy logos, food, or any other visual cues whatsoever, all that seems to remain is an empty shell—a carcass—carved entirely from birch and maple wood.

Titled Carcass, the installation was one of two large-scale dioramas on view at Kavi Gupta Gallery as part of Paine’s first solo show in Chicago, Apparatus. Via the gallery:

With Apparatus, Roxy Paine introduces a new chapter in his work, a series of large scale dioramas. Inspired by spaces and environments designed to be activated via human interaction, a fast-food restaurant and a control room, the dioramas present spaces and objects which are hand carved from birch and maple wood and formed from steel, encased and frozen in time, void of human presence, making their inherent function obsolete. Rooted in the Greek language, diorama translates to “through that which is seen”, a definition that has evolved throughout time as dioramas became conventionally known as physical windowed and encased rooms used as educational tools. Paine transforms the environments on display by using the diorama’s traditional experience as a tool to create a contemplative experience where what we see behind the glass transitions between being real and being a mere shell of something real.

The additional installation, Control Room (shown in the video above), similarly depicts an extraordinarily detailed collection of switches and knobs, a control center with an unknown function. You can learn more about both pieces over at Kavi Gupta. All photos by Joseph Rynkiewicz, courtesy the gallery.

 

 



Art Food Photography

Culinary Photographers Create Edible Backdrops for a World of Miniature Inhabitants

January 3, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Against a tasty backdrop of pastries, fruit, and vegetables, photographers Pierre Javelle and Akiko Ida have created a series of humorous dioramas that depict miniature people going about their daily lives in an edible world. Titled MINIMIAM, a play on words that marries miniature and “yummy” (miam in French), the project has been ongoing since 2002 and was inspired by the married couple’s profession as commercial food photographers. “We’re both food photographer in our daily work, and we’re both quite crazy about cooking, eating and everything about food,” says Ida. “So when we started this small people series, naturally we created the stories related to the food.”

The figures acquired for each photograph are taken from train model sets which are generally 1/87 scale, the perfect size for exploring lands of donuts or a frothy mix of meringue turned into a winter sledding adventure. The body of work has now grown to include some 60 sets of diptychs, and the pair is also creating large scale installations that more directly connect the model train world with sprawling food dioramas. You can see much more of their work over at MINIMIAM, or view it up close at the International Agriculture Show in Paris in February. (via Raw File)

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Art Photography

Photographer Creates Lifelike Images of American Streets Using Toy Car Models and Forced Perspective

October 16, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Over his long career of making and building, self-taught photographer Michael Paul Smith has at times referred to himself as a text book illustrator, a wallpaper hanger and house painter, a museum display designer, an architectural model maker, and art director. All of these skills have culminated in the amazing ability to shoot forced perspective outdoor scenes using his extensive diecast model car collection. Something he calls his “quirky hobby.”

For nearly 25 years Smith has been working on a fictional town he refers to as Elgin Park where all of his miniature scenes take place. To make each shot he positions an old card table at scenic points around Boston and positions his minutely detailed cars and model sets on top. Using an inexpensive point-and-shoot camera and natural light he then snaps away, simply eye-balling the perspective to get everything right.

While these are his most recent photos, earlier shots from the collection have gone into a book titled Elgin Park: An Ideal American Town. To learn more you can read an extensive interview over on Fstoppers. All photos courtesy Michael Paul Smith. (via PetaPixel)