dioramas

Posts tagged
with dioramas



Art Food Photography

Culinary Photographers Create Edible Backdrops for a World of Miniature Inhabitants

January 3, 2014

Christopher Jobson

sweet-green1
sweet-green2

Against a tasty backdrop of pastries, fruit, and vegetables, photographers Pierre Javelle and Akiko Ida have created a series of humorous dioramas that depict miniature people going about their daily lives in an edible world. Titled MINIMIAM, a play on words that marries miniature and “yummy” (miam in French), the project has been ongoing since 2002 and was inspired by the married couple’s profession as commercial food photographers. “We’re both food photographer in our daily work, and we’re both quite crazy about cooking, eating and everything about food,” says Ida. “So when we started this small people series, naturally we created the stories related to the food.”

The figures acquired for each photograph are taken from train model sets which are generally 1/87 scale, the perfect size for exploring lands of donuts or a frothy mix of meringue turned into a winter sledding adventure. The body of work has now grown to include some 60 sets of diptychs, and the pair is also creating large scale installations that more directly connect the model train world with sprawling food dioramas. You can see much more of their work over at MINIMIAM, or view it up close at the International Agriculture Show in Paris in February. (via Raw File)

Avocat-2
Avocat-1

Bento-1
Bento-2

lolita1
lolita2

Mont-Ventoux-1
Mont-Ventoux-2

Piment-rouge-2
Piment-rouge1

cacahuettes-1
cacahuettes-2

raisin-2
raisin-1

papy-luge1
papy-luge2

 

 



Art Photography

Photographer Creates Lifelike Images of American Streets Using Toy Car Models and Forced Perspective

October 16, 2013

Christopher Jobson

mini-1
mini-2

mini-3
mini-4

mini-5
mini-6

mini-7
mini-8

mini-9
mini-10

mini-11
mini-12

mini-13
mini-14

mini-15
mini-16

mini-last

Over his long career of making and building, self-taught photographer Michael Paul Smith has at times referred to himself as a text book illustrator, a wallpaper hanger and house painter, a museum display designer, an architectural model maker, and art director. All of these skills have culminated in the amazing ability to shoot forced perspective outdoor scenes using his extensive diecast model car collection. Something he calls his “quirky hobby.”

For nearly 25 years Smith has been working on a fictional town he refers to as Elgin Park where all of his miniature scenes take place. To make each shot he positions an old card table at scenic points around Boston and positions his minutely detailed cars and model sets on top. Using an inexpensive point-and-shoot camera and natural light he then snaps away, simply eye-balling the perspective to get everything right.

While these are his most recent photos, earlier shots from the collection have gone into a book titled Elgin Park: An Ideal American Town. To learn more you can read an extensive interview over on Fstoppers. All photos courtesy Michael Paul Smith. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Craft

Ordinary Behavior: Cardboard Electronics Containing Absurd Miniature Dioramas

June 25, 2013

Christopher Jobson

kevin-1

kevin-1-1

kevin-2

kevin-3

Artist and illustrator Kevin LCK works almost exclusively in black and white, so it comes as no surprise that as he’s ventured into sculptural objects the aesthetic has remained the same, while the dimensions clearly haven’t. In his new series Ordinary Behavior the artist builds dioramas into everyday electronic objects made from cardboard such as a computer, camera, and iPhone. The artist says his intention is to highlight the sometimes unhealthy relationship people have with technology and explains his thoughts in his artist statement:

‘Ordinary Behavior’ is a project about the unhealthy relationship between human and technology in an everyday context. […] I sought to detach the audience from the real world temporarily, provide them with a space to rethink and reconsider the way we behave and think about the relationship between ourselves, objects and environment with technology in a more conscious way.

You can see several more from the series here. (via beautiful/decay, junk culture)

 

 



Art Photography

Fictional Landscapes

January 10, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Colossal has seen its fair share of commendable book and paper work the last few weeks, but this was too good to pass up. UK-based artist Kyle Kirkpatrick constructs these wonderfully tiny dioramas using the topographies of carved books. Via the artist:

My practice is primarily concerned with the notion of the imagined landscape. I present man-made objects and natural materials simultaneously to form carefully and meticulously composed installation works. I capitalize on intrigue taking objects out of context reinventing their use, pushing the viewer to see beyond what I present before them, a glass could be interpreted as a lake or a metal bracket a cliff.

I don’t know about you but given the right disposable book (blasphemy!) I’d love to try making something like this. The first image and the vertical stack are photos by the artist, the rest are by Leo Reynolds and you can see even more work over on Saatchi Online. (via i want your lungs to stop working without me)

 

 



Art

Patrick Jacobs’ Magnified Portals into Miniature Worlds

November 30, 2011

Christopher Jobson


Diorama viewed through 7.5 in. (19 cm) window. Styrene, acrylic, cast neoprene, hair, paper, ash, talc, starch, polyurethane foam, vinyl film, wood, steel, lighting, BK7 glass.


Diorama viewed through 3 in. (7.6 cm) window. Wood, extruded styrene, acrylic, paper, ash, talc, starch, acrylite, vinyl film, copper, steel, lighting, BK7 glass.

Artist Patrick Jacobs creates small dioramas embedded in gallery walls, encased in magnifying lenses with a diameter as small as three inches. The effect is uncanny, focusing the viewers attention on the absolute tiniest of spaces containing lush green fields, cramped apartments, and clumps of small mushrooms. The pieces can take several weeks to complete, though one installation has consumed his spare time for over two years. Jacobs was born in California in 1971, attended the Art Institute of Chicago and now lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. (via arrested motion)