drawing

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Art Illustration

Meditative Geometric Shapes Doodled on Old Ledgers by Albert Chamillard

November 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Albert Chamillard’s monochromatic pen drawings have drawn acclaim for their ability to calm the minds of viewers. It’s interesting to learn, then, that Chamillard listens to punk and metal while crafting his art, which he shared in an interview with Faithwaites. Though each monochromatic pen-wrought work is undeniably flat, the artist’s careful use of cross-hatching creates a sense of volume by contrasting more- and less-saturated areas. Chamillard uses found and deadstock paper, especially vintage ledgers, and engages the papers’ subtle blue and red writing rules to frame subtle zig-zag patterns within each imagined plane, which further enlivens his seemingly simple drawings.

When he’s not working on his personal projects after hours, Chamillard runs a drawing and book making studio in Tucson, Arizona. He is represented by Eric Firestone Gallery in New York and Etherton Gallery in Tuscon. You can see more from the artist on Instagam.

 

 



Art Illustration

Alarming Studio Works by Pejac Focus on Earth’s Environmental Crisis

October 22, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

After taking a much-needed break over the summer following his successful presentation in Paris in June, Pejac is now back in his studio, developing new works for his U.S. debut in New York City and preparing a special limited edition that will be released toward the end of the year. Mixing his most recognizable techniques and mediums, he’s been sharing some of the alluring new pieces via his Instagram, including most recent drawings and works on pressed wood panels.

The Spanish artist first introduced the captivating works on wooden chipboard from the Redemption series back in January 2017, and eventually had an entire showcase focused on these pieces back in September 2017 in Venice. Known for revisiting his ideas and concepts, he recently finished this poignant new piece titled Safari. Mixing some of the previously seen imagery, such as patrolling helicopters with a spotlight, or a lonely stag, Pejac combines these visuals into a dynamic image that depicts a wild animal caught in the open by an unknown authority. Using fastidious shading and light effects, he uses the unorthodox composite wood medium to create a powerful effect of objects flying around the animal as its surrounding crumble around it. Once again putting a focus on the careless and ignorant bearing of humans towards nature, the artist constructed a gripping image utilizing an original technique he developed.

With similar thematic content, Pejac’s most recent solo exhibition on an old waterway barge on the Seine in Paris included three masterful large-scale drawings, along with other works on paper. Portraying a post-apocalyptic, surreal future, these meticulously rendered drawings mounted on thick frames were matched the quality of his paintings while depicting the hefty subject with a direct and delicate technique. Showing a lone character diving deep to retrieve a sinking lifebuoy ring in between plastic waste, or a helicopter removing a lighthouse over a desert, these images showcase Pejac’s poetic vision and his ability to pass a sharp and weighty message in the most poetic way.

A great example of such narrative is his canvas Le Bateau Ivre (The drunken boat) from 2015, titled after a poem written by Arthur Rimbaud, describing the drifting and sinking of a boat lost at sea in a fragmented first-person narrative saturated with vivid imagery and symbolism. Making an analogy with poem’s verbal saturation, the image shows two boys finishing from a small boat drifting through a sea densely polluted with garbage. Originally exhibited at his 2016 London solo show “Law of the Weakest,” this troubling vision from only three years ago is repeatedly becoming an alarming reality around the globe. You can see Pejac’s works in progress and stay up to date on show and print release announcements by following him on Instagram.

 

 



Art Illustration

Haunted Bodies: A Collection of New Hybrid Drawings About Healing and Loss by Christina Mrozik

October 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Portland-based artist Christina Mrozik (previously) closely observes flora and fauna to create hybrid drawings that unite the two in haunting new forms. In her monochrome work hair springs from hollow snake skins, claws emerge from floral bulbs, and spiders reveal human-like innards. Although there is a nightmarish quality to these unnatural combinations, a graceful undercurrent marks the way each invented creature twists upon the page.

Recently Mrozik compiled a collection of drawings and writings she created while moving through a period of depression. Despite their surreal composition, they express the deeply human emotions of loss and fear. “Merging pieces of organ, flora, and animal, these faceless drawings are an attempt to capture the ‘haunted’ feeling of inaccessibility, expressing an experience outside the clarity of language,” she explains. “Releasing this collection as a book creates a physical reminder both of the reality of a difficult circumstance, and the community moving through the common casualty of life alongside you. It creates the space that only books can, where one can participate whilst in the solitude of their experience.”

Her new book, Haunted Bodies: An Art Book of Poems and Drawings is currently being funded through Kickstarter. You can see more of her drawings, illustrations, and recent ceramic works on her website and Instagram.

Photo by Dana Halferty

Photo by Dana Halferty

Photo by Dana Halferty

Photo by Dana Halferty

 

 



Animation Illustration

A Hand-Drawn Animation of Merging Faces and Morphing Bodies by Daniel Zvereff

September 28, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Brooklyn-based artist Daniel Zvereff works in a combination of drawing, photography, and videography and all three come into play in an animated short. The three minute long film is a music video for Norwegian singer-songwriter Okay-Kaya‘s song “Emulate”. It is a departure from her other music videos, which usual feature the singer herself in live action scenarios. Throughout the video, pieces of unbound notebook paper show shifting blue drawings. Ranging from moving faces to animals and planets, as well as abstract shapes, the drawings are all executed in simple line work, in a unified blue hue. You can see more of Zvereff’s work on his website and Flickr. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

 

 



Art

New Sprawling Ink Drawings by Olivia Kemp Explore the Landscapes of Malta and Bavaria

August 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images courtesy of Olivia Kemp

British artist Olivia Kemp (previously) creates sprawling, large-scale ink drawings of real world landscapes that are built from photography, observational sketches, and her own memories of the visited destinations. Her two most recent works took a combined nine months to complete, and are pulled from her travels to Malta and Bavaria. Kemp’s drawing “Ascending The High Pass” is inspired by Bavaria’s castles, and is composed of towers, cliffs, and a winding train line that connects the city through a series of bridges and tunnels.

For her other recent piece, she focused more on the plant life of the location. “Unlike with the castles drawing, ‘Melita, Maleth’ was very much a response to selecting a random location and spending time there getting to know it,” Kemp tells Colossal. “I was interested in going to Malta, but didn’t have any particular drawing or architectural style or composition in mind before I went. I loved the variation of plant life on the island, and felt really strongly that the drawing needed to have a full and rich foreground, including all the flora that had most interested me.”

Kemp will often create smaller drawing studies while on location, which she will then incorporate into her larger works. Both “Ascending The High Pass” and “Melita, Maleth” will be included in the group exhibition Early Modern Matters which opens on September 6 at James Freeman Gallery in London and closes September 29, 2018. You can see more of the artist’s work on Instagram and Twitter.

"Melita, Maleth" in process

“Melita, Maleth” in process

"Melita, Maleth"

“Melita, Maleth”

"Melita, Maleth" in process

“Melita, Maleth” in process

"Melita, Maleth" with reference drawings

“Melita, Maleth” with reference drawings

"Melita, Maleth" in process

“Melita, Maleth” in process

Detail of "Ascending The High Pass"

Detail of “Ascending The High Pass”

"Ascending The High Pass" in process

“Ascending The High Pass” in process

"Ascending The High Pass"

“Ascending The High Pass”

"Ascending The High Pass" in process

“Ascending The High Pass” in process

Olivia drawing "Ascending The High Pass"

Olivia drawing “Ascending The High Pass”

 

 

 



Art

Multiple Perspectives Form Elaborately Detailed Cityscapes by Nathan Walsh

August 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Pier 17" (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 50 inches

“Pier 17” (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 50 inches, all images via Nathan Walsh

British artist Nathan Walsh (previously) creates oil painted cityscapes by combining reference images from a range of perspectives and angles. His latest work Catching Fire was created from a combination of photographs taken during three visits to New York City over a two year period. The painting more accurately captures the feeling of Times Square rather an exact representation, presenting multiple horizon points to make the viewer feel as if they are at the center of the neon-washed environment.

In addition to taking numerous photographs of his chosen location, Walsh also spends time sketching his surroundings in a series of thumbnail drawings. “Of late I’ve found the sketchbook to be of increasing importance even for notes on color or whatever I happen to be thinking about at the time,” he tells Colossal. “This immediate personal response to the environment plays an important role when I’m back in my studio in the United Kingdom and reliant on the photographs taken.”

Once he’s decided on the subject and scale of the painting, he draws in elements in a fairly loose and intuitive way. “Freehand drawing is fundamental to all of my work, allowing me to take full ownership of photographic material,” he explains. “Rejecting the mechanical transfer of imagery forces me to construct each object from scratch and allows for a fluid and inventive approach.”

By selecting segments from a variety of photographs of each scene, Walsh is able to construct his own reality of a space within an urban environment. This includes shifting key elements of his paintings into what he describes as different perspective “zones,” which he explains allows his works to more closely relate to how we experience a city while we are walking through it.

Over the last three years, Walsh’s paintings have begun to focus more heavily on the weather conditions present in a particular location, homing in on the reflective sidewalks produced during a rainstorm or the geometric bands of light that infiltrate an urban space during a bright, cloudless day. You can view of a selection of Walsh’s New York City paintings in his upcoming solo exhibition at Bernarducci Gallery in Manhattan, which opens September 6 and runs through September 29, 2018. More of Walsh’s cityscapes can be seen on his Instagram and Twitter.

"Catching Fire" (2017), oil on canvas, 53 x 108 inches

“Catching Fire” (2017), oil on canvas, 53 x 108 inches

Drawing for "Catching Fire" (2017), oil on canvas, 53 x 108 inches

Drawing for “Catching Fire” (2017), oil on canvas, 53 x 108 inches

"Lake Street' (2017), oil on linen, 34 x 52 inches

“Lake Street’ (2017), oil on linen, 34 x 52 inches

"ZBAR" (2016), oil on canvas, 51 x 115 inches

“ZBAR” (2016), oil on canvas, 51 x 115 inches

"Ed Koch" (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

“Ed Koch” (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

Detail of "Ed Koch" (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

Detail of “Ed Koch” (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

Detail drawing of "Ed Koch" (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

Detail drawing of “Ed Koch” (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

"Peninsula" (2017), oil on canvas, 69 x 133 inches

“Peninsula” (2017), oil on canvas, 69 x 133 inches

 

 



Illustration

Three-Dimensional Paper Doodles Created With Playful Folds and Rips by HuskMitNavn

July 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Danish artist HuskMitNavn (which translates to “Remember My Name”) is a painter, muralist, and compulsive doodler who creates clever three-dimensional drawings. The simple constructions are made from paper and pen, and depict cartoon characters in humorous situations like Mario avoiding an arsenal of tumbling barrels thrown by a looming Donkey Kong.

“It’s a long (and ongoing) process coming up with the 3D drawings,” HuskMitNavn tells Colossal. “I have been making so many drawing on flat paper my whole life and one day a few years ago I just started to experiment with the paper to see if could add another dimension to it. The idea is to make it very simple only using A4 size paper and a pen. No scissors or glue. I want everybody to join in and also try to 3D drawings at the kitchen table.”

HuskMitNavn has an upcoming solo exhibition titled TEGN at Nikolaj Kunsthal in Copenhagen from August 29, 2018 through January 2019. You can a variety of the artist’s cross-media work on his website and dozens more of his ripped drawings on Instagram.