drawing

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Art

A Gigantic Helium-Filled and Charcoal-Studded Sphere Covers Rooms with Unpredictable Designs

May 30, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Polish-German artist Karina Smigla-Bobinski gives buoyancy to the act of drawing with ADA, a large inflatable drawing tool. Filled with helium, ADA floats freely, making lines with its charcoal spikes as it moves through a room. More dramatic mark-making starts to occur when humans are added to the mix: the video above shows visitors engaging with ADA at Muffathalle where it was installed for a week in Munich, Germany.

The artist describes ADA in a statement: “The globe put in action fabricates a composition of lines and points, which remain incalculable in their intensity, expression, and form however hard the visitor tries to control ADA, to drive her, to domesticate her. Whatever he tries out, he would notice very soon, that ADA is an independent performer, studding the originally white walls with drawings and signs.”

Smigla-Bobinski categorizes ADA as biotechnology and pays homage to past creatives that have designed computer-like works, which give unpredictable outputs once given a command. She mentions Ada Lovelace, Jean Tinguely, and Vannevar Bush as influences.

The artist studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Krakow and Munich. Her work, which ranges from kinetic sculptures to multimedia theater performances, has been shown in forty five countries. ADA made its debut at the Electronic Language Int. Festival in São Paulo, in 2011, and has since traveled the world. You can see more from Smigla-Bobinski on her website and YouTube channel.

 

 



Art

Satirical Images of Virtue and Vice Painted by Toni Hamel

May 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"The Impostor (George's Zebra)" (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches, all images via Toni Hammel

“The Impostor (George’s Zebra)” (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches, all images via Toni Hammel

Toronto-based artist Toni Hamel works across mediums to create drawings, paintings, and sculptures that analyze human behavior. In her two-dimensional work the artist often incorporates animals and icebergs being treated as art objects by men in lab coats and smocks. The male subjects are seen analyzing or altering the zebras, giraffes, and whales, painting over their spots or pinning on stripes with a marked precision.

Hamel describes her art practice as an “illustrated commentary of human frailties,” seeking to highlight peculiar behavior in humans. “Drawing from personal experiences and outward observations, I point to historical, social, and psychological references,” she tells Colossal. “Virtues and vices, the holy and the profane, the good and the bad, all share equal weight and supply as infinite source material for my investigations.”

Hamel received her BFA from the Accademia di Belle Arti of Lecce in 1983, and a post-graduate certificate in Computer Graphics from Sheridan College in 1991. You can see more of her satirical works on human behavior on her website and Instagram.

"The Heist" (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches

“The Heist” (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches

"The Watch" (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x1.5 inches

“The Watch” (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x1.5 inches

"Now You See Me" (2016), oil on Arches oil paper, 15 x 22 inches

“Now You See Me” (2016), oil on Arches oil paper, 15 x 22 inches

"Opening night"(2016), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

“Opening night”(2016), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

"The Pretender" (2016), oil on Arches oil paper, 15 x 22 inches

“The Pretender” (2016), oil on Arches oil paper, 15 x 22 inches

"Ceci n'est pas un arbre (pour Charlie)" (2016), oil on canvas, 16 x 20 inches

“Ceci n’est pas un arbre (pour Charlie)” (2016), oil on canvas, 16 x 20 inches

"Weathermen" (2016), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

“Weathermen” (2016), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

 

 



Art

Waterline: Pejac Unveils New Drawings to Be Exhibited in a Floating Gallery on Paris’ Seine River

May 15, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

Continuously secretive and unexpected when it comes to revealing his projects, Pejac (previously) once again surprised the art world by announcing an upcoming self-produced pop-up solo exhibition in Paris. Roughly a year since his last showing at an old gondola workshop on the canals of Venice, and a month since his surprise visit to NYC, the Spanish artist just announced this new show titled Waterline.

To exhibit this selection of new work, Pejac found an old péniche boat that will be transformed into an unconventional floating art gallery from June 20-24th, 2018. Moored right next to Notre-Dame cathedral, this vintage vessel will host his most intimate show to date, presenting a large series of accomplished studio drawings. Works on paper are a crucial part of Pejac’s creative process and are usually the first step toward large public interventions or canvases, but are truly artworks in their own right.

“What people get to see on paper, on canvas, on a wall, or as a finished sculpture, is the end of a very long trip that starts inside of you.  When I start painting or drawing, that is the end, not the beginning of the process. Before that happens, I have already tried so many different ideas and made so many choices.” —Pejac for Spring issue of Juxtapoz Magazine

By showcasing previously unseen works, Waterline will grant the most direct look at the unmediated stage of the artist’s practice. Created mostly with charcoal or pencil on paper, these images are the early stages of concepts we’ve already seen turn into large pieces, or might still evolve into their final versions. Poetic and despairing, these striking pictures propose an unconventional future focused on the ways in which humans treat resources and the environment, as well as current socio-political issues and “modern society” values. You can see more of Pejac’s recent work on Instagram.

 

 



Animation

Le Nuage: An Animated Short Explores the Frustrations of Creative Expression

April 25, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Le Nuage is a short film by Russian film student Iulia Voitova which succinctly displays the many frustrations of creative output, including sadness, distraction, and writer’s block. The animated film is composed of two collaged paper characters, an earnest young woman in a bright blue dress, and a brooding male writer hunched over his typewriter. In an attempt to shield the writer from a patch of rain, the female protagonist unintentionally thwarts his rumbling brainstorm. The entire piece takes place in less than a minute and a half, yet perfectly encapsulates several shifts in mood through its playful pastel-colored characters and delightful score by Lawrence Williams.

Voitova created the work with the theme “bad weather” for La Poudrière animation film school. You can see more of her shorts, including 2017’s equally enchanting Minute de Gloire, on Vimeo, Instagram, and Behance.

 

 



Art

New 360-Degree Immersive Drawing Created With 120 Marker Pens by Oscar Oiwa

April 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

For his latest immersive installation, Oscar Oiwa (previously) created a 360-degree black and white drawing that fills the space of an inflatable vinyl balloon. The work, Oscar Oiwa in Paradise – Drawing the Ephemeral, took Oiwa and his five assistants two weeks and 120 marker pens to create. Visitors are invited to enter the encapsulating drawing to fully experience Oiwa’s imagined environment, which is composed of dark patches of forest, winding pathways, and a sky filled with high-contrast swirls.

“I’ve always enjoyed drawing, which I consider the most basic way of expressing myself visually,” said Oiwa in a press release regarding the large-scale work. “A pencil and a blank sheet— there is no simpler medium than that.”

The exhibition is presented at JAPAN HOUSE São Paulo, a venue that showcases traditional Japanese culture through a modern lens. Drawing the Ephemeral runs through June 3, 2018. You can watch the making of the massive drawing in the short video below.

 

 

 



Illustration

Delicate Inked Lines Form Fluffy Black Cats in Illustrations by Kamwei Fong

March 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Using only black ink, Malaysian illustrator Kamwei Fong has created a menagerie of playful black cats. Despite their contextual isolation and uniform style, each of Fong’s cats display unique personalities: some are fluffed and puffed into self-contained balls; others look with curiosity or wariness at fish that dangle or waves that crash from the animals’ own tails. The artist builds each feline form using innumerable short thin lines, varying the density of the marks to create volume as well as a palpable sense of furriness.

Fong has been working as an illustrator since 2010, under the moniker Bo & Friends, and in addition to his cat character, which he calls The Furry Thing, he dreams up similarly charming monkeys, goldfish, puppies, and other animals in his line-driven black ink drawings. Fong sells signed print editions of his animal illustrations in his Etsy shop, and also partners with Galerie Club Sensible in Paris. You can see more of his work on Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



Illustration

Clever Sketches by Christoph Niemann Turn Everyday Scenes into Humorous Moments

March 9, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Illustrator Christoph Niemann (previously) plays with scale and context to create small scenes using ink and everyday materials. In his object-focused works, a few deft brushstrokes turn a pair of socks into the head and torso of a dinosaur, and a pressed paintbrush flares into a dancer’s swinging skirt. Other sketches are based on photographs, usually of the streets of New York City where the artist lives. For the past few years, he has shared these illustrations each Sunday via Instagram. Niemann also sells prints of his series of Sunday Sketches, along with original drawings, in his online store. He has also published a book, Sunday Sketching.