drawing

Posts tagged
with drawing



Art Design

Custom Polargraph Drawings

September 21, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Mechanical drawing madman Sandy Noble (previously) continues to crank out great polargraph drawings, but has taken the artform in two new directions. First you can now order customized polargraph prints directly via Etsy, all you have to do is provide the imagery. And, for the more robotically inclined (ie. hardcore), Noble helps you buy or build one of the devices for endless squiggly drawing fun.

 

 



Art Design

3D Drawing Machine

September 11, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Vision is a rather unique 3D drawing device created by twins Ryan & Trevor Oakes, allowing almost anyone to draw images in perfect perspective using nothing but your eyes and a pen. The device MESSES WITH YOUR BRAIN by using a technique that splits the ocular system, creating two images of the subject, allowing the artist to literally trace one directly onto paper. You really need to watch the video to get a clear idea of how it works, and there’s also some rather touching remarks about the nature of the twins relationship.

This made the rounds back in 2009, but that was pre-Colossal, and before the recent creation of the video above, so I feel at least somewhat justified covering it here. Plus, it’s just freaking awesome, and gave me an excuse to finally create the drawing machines tag. (via polkadot)

 

 



Art

Wind Drawings

September 6, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Artist and architect Peter Jellitsch created this series of pen and ink drawings entitled STB based on algorithms that predict how air will move through highrise buildings.

STB means Streambody, this series is based on a motion algorithm that is used in architectural practice to simulate wind directions and the force of air that arrives at highrise buildings. I have experimented with this program, and the outcome was solid bubbles which I have then redrawn with the directions that they had. The degree denotation that my title has (for example: STB/S02/90°) is explaining the turn of the wind-force hitting the object.

Read more over on Triangulation.

 

 



Illustration

Pen and Ink Tree Rings by Tony Hong

August 27, 2011

Christopher Jobson

A commendable pen and ink drawing of tree rings by California-based illustrator and artist Tony Hong, be sure to click for added detail. (via eileenede)

 

 



Illustration

Cesar Del Valle’s Illustrations Interact with their Physical Surroundings

August 17, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Columbian illustrator Cesar Del Valle‘s drawings are so detailed they could practically be photographs and if the illustrations weren’t realistic enough he then has them interact with the physical world they find themselves in. A figure delicately balances on a pencil protruding from a wall or a girl balances on an actual string affixed to the canvas. I have a feeling his artwork would make an even greater impression seeing it firsthand, but regardless this is truly remarkable stuff. (via behance)

 

 



Art

A Helium-filled Kinetic Drawing Sculpture by Karina Smigla-Bobinski

August 16, 2011

Christopher Jobson

ADA – Analog Interactive Installation, is a kinetic sculpture by German-based artist Karina Smigla-Bobinski. The installation is made form an enormous helium-inflated sphere trapped inside a small room that’s spiked with dozens of protruding charcoal pieces which scrape the edges of the gallery wall as participants push, toss, and otherwise manipulate it. Most recently it was on display at the Electronic Language International Festival in São Paulo this Summer that took place in São Paulo. It’s fascinating to me that given the constraints of the sphere and room, a single outcome (pictured at bottom) is destined to emerge, but yet requires the participation of dozens if not hundreds of gallery visitors. Reminds me of the work of Roman Ondák. (via we make money not art, photos courtesy we make money not art, s.antonio, and the artist)

 

 



Art

Time Print Machine

August 1, 2011

Christopher Jobson

The Time Print Machine by designer Paul Ferragut uses standard felt-tip pens mounted to a device controlled by custom hardware using openFrameworks to draw pointilist representations of images. The marker stays in contact with the paper for a time period relative to the brightness of the pixel it’s attempting to draw, thus the “bleed” of the marker creates larger spots for darker pixels and smaller ones for lighter. Ferragut further modified the machine to create successive 4-pass CMYK drawings as well. This certainly isn’t the quickest method of drawing something with a robot, but it’s pretty darn neat. See some more detailed photos of the drawings and the machine here, and also check out his gesture drawing device. Thanks Paul for sharing your work with Colossal!

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Butterfly Pop-Up Cards