faces

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Photography

Composite Photograph Made from 500 Self-Portraits

November 1, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Ever since photographer Noah Kalina began his Everyday portrait project 11 years ago (I had no idea he was still actively photographing himself, talk about commitment) there have been hundreds of inspired photogs snapping daily self-portraits. Flickr user clickflashwhir is one of these people, taking hundreds of portraits over the past several years. Tiemen Rapati downloaded 500 of her photos and created this beautiful composite image by finding an average RGB value for each pixel and dividing it by the total number of portraits. I have no idea how this is done, but I bet it involves computers. It’s amazing how surgically accurate she must sit, I assume using her eyes to align each shot. Really stunning. Just a note, though it says Tiemen used 400 photos on Flickr, he averaged in another 100 for this post. (via feltron)

 

 



Art

Paintings by Andrew Salgado

November 1, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Some newer paintings by artist Andrew Salgado who has a solo show at Taché Gallery in New York through November 12.

 

 



Art

Root Sculptures by Kim Sun Hyuk

September 22, 2011

Christopher Jobson

I’m enjoying these metallic sculptures depicting human root systems by South Korean artist Kim Sun Hyuk from his series Drawn by Life. Unfortunately I couldn’t find better images, but I think this gets the idea across. (via neolook)

 

 



Art

Bottle Cap Portrait

September 19, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Artist Mary Ellen Croteau was working on an artwork involving plastic bottle caps, creating tall endless strings that are strung vertically in colorful columns. She repeatedly noticed how some of the caps would fit neatly inside of one another creating new color combinations similar to the portraits of Chuck Close. Inspired, she became sidetracked and embarked on her own self portrait using the colors that “naturally” appeared in the bottle cap plastic.

This work was submitted by John Mangahas as part of the Curatorial Contest of Awesomness that was held this past week on Facebook. We received nearly 100 submissions and the six winners and the awesome work they brought to my attention will be blogged about over the next few days. Side note: I had Megan help me sort through the 90+ submissions, and of our individual lists of the “best” six items, four were identical. What!

Missed out on all the action? Don’t worry, based on the success of this contest I’ll be doing another one soon, probably here on the blog itself. For now, go ahead and follow along via Facebook or Twitter as there’s lots of stuff happening in both places that doesn’t always end up here!

 

 



Art

MESA

September 15, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Love this new mural by MESA. (via private hell)

 

 



Photography

Frostbite

September 11, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Incredibly beautiful capture of a frozen statue. Spent twenty minutes trying to find the photographer with no luck. Anyone? (via fasels suppe)

Update: It’s by photographer Miika Järvinen, as part of this series. Unfortunately there’s not an easy way to browse it, but if you like barren icescapes, there’s some real gems. (thnx, william!)

 

 



Art

Skull Nickels

September 4, 2011

Christopher Jobson

My friend Ben (previously) shot me a link to this article about carved coins called Hobo Nickels. Although the history of carving miniature bas relief sculptures into coins stretches back to the 18th century if not earlier, it was greatly popularized in the early 20th century with the introduction of the Buffalo nickel. This particular coin was minted using soft metal and was imprinted with the portrait of an indian with bold features, making it easier to deface and transform into the portraits of other people, animals, or even scenery. Add to that the idle hands of unemployed artists during the depression (thus, “hobo”) and soon a flood of curious numismatic treasures were born. Most of the images on hobo nickels are too folk artsy for my taste, however a number of artists etched away the flesh of the subject to reveal these awesomely macabre skulls. Hobo nickel carving remains a popular hobby today and it even has a society. Don’t you wish we had actual money that looked like this? Images linked to their sources, most of which are live Ebay auctions. (thnx, ben!)