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Art Food

Glass Cross Sections of Fruit and Other Foods by Elliot Walker

August 26, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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London-based artist Elliot Walker uses molten glass to create a stunning variety sculptures including these arrangements of eating utensils, vessels, and cross sections of food. The stark outer surfaces of the surrounding objects contrasts with the vibrant interiors of the edible pieces, not unlike the effect of a cut geode. Walker currently has work at the Peter Layton Glass Blowing Studio as part of their current exhibition titled Essence that runs through the end of the week. You can see more photos of his work on Facebook.

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Art Food History Science

A 17th-Century Stanchi Painting Reveals the Rapid Change in Watermelons through Selective Breeding [Updated]

July 30, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Giovanni Stanchi (Rome c. 1645-1672). Oil on canvas. 38 5/8 x 52½ in. (98 x 133.5 cm.) / Courtesy Christie’s

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Old master work paintings are frequently cited for their depiction of historical events, documentation of culture, or portraiture of significant people, but there’s one lesser known use of some paintings for those with a keen eye: biology. One such instance is this Renaissance still life of various fruits on a table by Giovanni Stanchi painted sometime in the 1600s that shows a nearly unrecognizable watermelon before it was selectively bred for meatier red flesh.

Horticulture professor James Nienhuis at the University of Wisconsin tells Vox that he’s fascinated by old still life paintings that often contain the only documentation of various fruits and vegetables before we transformed them forever into something more desirable for human use. You can read a bit more about the science behind the changes in watermelons over the last 350 years here. (via Kottke)

Update: Greg Cato writes: “The painting depicts a rare outcome of sub-par growing conditions, known as ‘starring.’ It’s perfectly normal, still happens, and is not the result of selective breeding (although it would be cool if it were).” You can see an example here.

 

 



Photography

Painstaking Arrangements of Colorful Objects and Food by Emily Blincoe

June 11, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Tennessee-based photographer Emily Blincoe (previously) continues to create some of the most meticulously arranged collections of objects we’ve seen. From leaves and flowers to cereal and trash, the photographer is capable of making visually soothing layouts of almost any object. One of Blincoe’s latest projects is the Collection Collection featuring portraits of people laying down against their personal collections of things like rocks or figurines. You can follow her work on Instagram, and many of the images you see here are available as prints in her shop. (via Bored Panda)

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Design Food Science

Edible Growth: 3D-Printed Living Food That Grows before You Eat It

March 2, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Photo by Bart van Overbeeke

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3D-printed nylon prototype

Edible Growth is an ongoing project by Eindhoven-based food designer Chloé Rutzerveld that blends food, gardening, and 3d printing. The concept involves a specially printed outer casing made from dough that contains “edible soil” and various seeds. Once printed, it takes a few days for the seeds and mushrooms to germinate after which they start to poke out of the small holes on top. All that’s left to do is pop it in your mouth. Rutzerveld’s design is currently just a concept and would involve several years of research, namely around 3d printing technology and issues of food safety. Regardless, it seems like the rest of the project would be fun just to try at home for the sake of novelty. You can read more about Edible Growth on Rutzerveld’s website. (via Dezeen)