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Design

What’s New Is Old Again: A Classic Norwegian Chair Produced with 100% Recycled Materials

February 6, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

The newest chair by Nordic Comfort Products (NCP) is a unique and sustainable twist on an old classic. Their R-48 model has furnished schools and offices since the 1960s, but has previously required virgin plastic and a metal base. Their recent addition, the S-1500, was designed by international design firm Snøhetta, and is constructed from nothing new. The marbled green chair is composed of 100% recycled plastic sourced from local fish farming companies’ old fish nets, ropes, and pipes and a subframe made from recycled steel.

The design is a result of a two-year research project by Snøhetta to investigate plastic’s journey through the supply chain and see how it might be repurposed as a building material once it has served its original purpose. Typically NCP uses plastic from China to create their furniture. Their new chairs will create a local, circular economy which puts to use the worn out tools of neighboring businesses while also cutting down on fossil emissions from shipping materials internationally. The chair will be showcased at the Stockholm Furniture and Light Fair from February 5 to 9, 2019. You can see other ways Snøhetta is putting their plastic research to use on their website and Instagram. (via Fast Company)

 

 



Design

Wooden Credenzas and Cabinets Elegantly Open into Surprising Silhouettes

February 5, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Sebastian ErraZuriz (previously) creates functional storage pieces that double as elegant sculptures for his ongoing series Mechanical Cabinet. His credenzas, cabinets, and other units open in a myriad of creative ways, like a piece that fans out in four different directions, or an unassuming box which opens to reveal nearly two dozen drawers and a mirror.

“We tend to understand reality by constraining meaning into closed and simplified boxes defined by previous cultural conventions,” he explains in a press release for his current solo exhibition Breaking the Box at R & Company in New York City. “We live within these pre-established cognitive borders, where we only tend to see, recognize, and accept as true that which has been previously ordered and defined.” Breaking the Box is on view through March 9, 2019. You can see more of his designs on his website and Instagram.

      

 

 



Art

Secondhand Armchairs and Loveseats Reconstructed Into Dripping Multi-Media Sculptures by Nina Saunders

December 12, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Danish artist Nina Saunders creates sculptures that drip, tip, and spill what appears to be amorphous contents onto the ground, turning domestic objects of comfort and kitsch into sculptural pieces unintended for practical use. Her works typically involve secondhand furniture like armchairs and love seats, with the occasional melting piano thrown into her multi-media practice. Floral fabrics run from chair to floor, while the shiny black exterior of a piano seems to leak from its position on the balcony of a busy mall.

No matter what alteration Saunders makes to her collected furniture objects, they are always rendered unusable, with cushions ballooned to an abnormal proportion or legs leaning to an unnaturally slanted angle. Several of her works were included in the recent Hang-Up Collections Exhibition at Hang-Up Gallery in London alongside works by Banksy, David Shrigley, Bonnie and Clyde, and several others. You can see more of Saunders’ sculptural works on her website.

 

 



Craft Design

Miniature Interior Decor Elements Crafted With Impeccable Detail by Kiyomi

December 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese miniaturist Kiyomi imitates antiques with a stunning attention to detail, creating worn and clouded glass jars, slightly tarnished silverware, and cases packed with dozens of drawers. The talented craftswoman produces pieces for dollhouses out of paper, wire, wood, and other materials that imitate their larger companions. To give her audience a sense of scale, the artist will present her small works alongside a scaleable object, either placing a miniature chair on the seat of a regularly proportioned seat or dwarfing a set of drawers by putting it on the step of a ladder. You can see more of her antique items and delicious-looking fake pastries on her Instagram and website.  (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Design

A System of Root-Like Benches Spreads Organically Through a South Korean Public Park

November 26, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Root Bench is a multi-height bench system installed in Hangang Park in Seoul, South Korea. The design is a winning proposal by Yong Ju Lee, which creates a circular protrusion of roots that provides space for rest and relaxation. The nearly 100-foot diameter installation is formed from conjoined slats of wood attached to a metal frame, and sprawls from a centralized point in the park. Three different heights accommodate children’s seating, adult chairs, and tables for picnicking. This provides space for all sizes, and allows gatherings that vary from intimate to community-wide celebrations. (via designboom)

 

 



Art Design

Spaghetti-like Benches by Pablo Reinoso Twist into Interlocking Circles and Climb up Nearby Walls

October 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Huge Sudely Bench" (2010), Painted steel, h. 188 x l. 955 x w. 238 cm

“Huge Sudeley Bench” (2010), Painted steel, h. 188 x l. 955 x w. 238 cm

French-Argentine artist and designer Pablo Reinoso has been designing and fabricating sculptural benches since he was just 15. Throughout his nearly five decades as an artist he has explored several iterations of both seating and sculptural forms, including his two most recent series Spaghetti and Garabatos. Each work is a bench at its very core, but its structure has been elongated and twisted into an object that expresses a little bit of anarchy and a lot of play.

“Reinoso stages benches that, having fulfilled their role as furniture, become once again branches that can grow and climb,” explains the artist’s statement on his website. “…they can at least express themselves freely by embracing architecture, roaming through places, exploring gaps, and giving free rein to their whims.”

Although Reinoso has always explored the structure of the bench, he has often diverged into other disciplines as a part of his wide-sweeping practice. He has explored sculpture, photography, architecture, and design, each with a bit of humor and a desire to test limits in understanding and form. His installation “The Circle,” from his series Garabatos, is currently installed in Paris’s Tuileries Garden through November 7, 2018. You can few a larger selection from this series on his website and Instagram.

"Huge Sudely Bench" (2010), Painted steel, h. 188 x l. 955 x w. 238 cm

“Huge Sudeley Bench” (2010), Painted steel, h. 188 x l. 955 x w. 238 cm

"Circular Bench" (2012), Painted steel, h. 100 x diameter. 650 cm, photo by Eric Sander

“Circular Bench” (2012), Painted steel, h. 100 x diameter. 650 cm, photo by Eric Sander

"Spaghetti Bâle" (2008), Carved wood and steel, l. 320 x h. 253 x depth 168 cm

“Spaghetti Bâle” (2008), Carved wood and steel, l. 320 x h. 253 x depth 168 cm

"Spaghetti Ballade" (2007), Carved wood and steel, h. 473 x l. 376 x w. 375 cm

“Spaghetti Ballade” (2007), Carved wood and steel, h. 473 x l. 376 x w. 375 cm

"Vice Versa" (2012), Painted steel, 6.10 x h. 1, 2012

“Vice Versa” (2012), Painted steel, 6.10 x h. 1, 2012

"Ecuries Bench" (2012), Painted steel, h. 100 x diameter 600 cm

“Ecuries Bench” (2012), Painted steel, h. 100 x diameter 600 cm

"Double Bench" (2006), Wood and steel, 471 x 77 x 69 cm
, photo by Rodrigo Reinos

“Double Bench” (2006), Wood and steel, 471 x 77 x 69 cm
, photo by Rodrigo Reinos

"Chaises de l'harmonie" (2011), Painted steel, 12 elements, h. 5 x 8 m, semi-circular diameter (variable dimensions)

“Chaises de l’harmonie” (2011), Painted steel, 12 elements, h. 5 x 8 m, semi-circular diameter (variable dimensions)

"Little Talk L" (2017), Painted steel, h. 1 x l. 5.45 x w. 1.45 m, photo by Rodrigo Reinoso

“Little Talk L” (2017), Painted steel, h. 1 x l. 5.45 x w. 1.45 m, photo by Rodrigo Reinoso

 

 



Art

Domestic Sculptures Formed With Wood Grown at the United States and Mexico Border by Hugh Hayden

September 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"America" (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“America” (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Texas-born sculptor Hugh Hayden (previously) combines different varieties of wood to create furniture and other domestic objects with protruding spikes and branches. For his latest exhibition Border States at Lisson Gallery in New York City, Hayden addresses notions of citizenship and boundaries with sculptures made using wood indigenous to the United States and Mexico border. The traditional family ideals of the American Dream are evoked in objects such as a dining room table, picket fence, and child’s stroller, yet their source material speaks to the contentious practices upheld at our nation’s border.

Eastern Red Cedar, a wood from Texas with a pinkish interior, composes 
The Jones Part 3, a fence covered in branches which reach out at the audience from its vertical slats. “Texas Ebony,” a dark wood that grows at the border, composes another sculpture, while the weed-like Mesquite forms a kitchen table and chairs titled America.

Hayden currently lives and works in New York City. Border States runs at Lisson Gallery through October 27, 2018. You can see more of his politically-minded sculptures on his website and Instagram.

"America" (detail) (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“America” (detail) (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery. 

"Cable News" (2018
), Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) with mirror and hardware, 
101 x 31 1/2 x 19 1/2 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“Cable News” (2018
), Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) with mirror and hardware, 
101 x 31 1/2 x 19 1/2 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.<span style="color: #444444; font-size: 1rem;"> </span>

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery. 

"
The Jones Part 3" (2018), 
Sculpted eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) with steel
, 78 1/2 x 180 x 26 3/4 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“
The Jones Part 3” (2018), 
Sculpted eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) with steel
, 78 1/2 x 180 x 26 3/4 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

"Untitled (Wagon)" (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei)
, 100 x 89 x 65 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“Untitled (Wagon)” (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei)
, 100 x 89 x 65 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

"Untitled (French gothic picket)" (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) on plywood
, 
68 x 98 x 59 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“Untitled (French gothic picket)” (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) on plywood
, 
68 x 98 x 59 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

 

 

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