futuristic

Posts tagged
with futuristic



Craft Design

It Was Better Tomorrow: Fashion Designer Benjamin Benmoyal Creates Powerful Silhouettes Using Recycled Materials

November 6, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Hulking silhouettes are enlivened with vibrant multi-colored stripes in futuristic garments by fashion student Benjamin Benmoyal. The fabric for the collection, titled “It Was Better Tomorrow”, was woven on a loom using discarded video and cassette tapes intermingled with recycled yarns and Tencel (a wood pulp-derived fiber).

In an interview with Dezeen, the French-Israeli designer explained that he was feeling pessimistic about the world after his compulsory service as an 18 year old in the Israeli army. “After high school I was completely lost in my life, I failed many things and needed to prove to myself I could do something that would push me, physically and mentally, to the limits,” Benmoyal said.

In enrolling at the renowned art school Central Saint Martins and creating this collection, Benmoyal sought to channel optimistic energy and harken back to the utopian outlook of the 1960’s. He also drew color inspiration from international travels and artists he admires, such as James Turrell. The collection was included in the multi-art show Designing in Turbulent Times this autumn. See more from Benmoyal on Instagram. (via Dezeen)

 

 



Art

FILTRATE: A Futurist Guerrilla-Style Short Film Shot on an iPhone in Montreal’s Subways

April 16, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

A new short film titled FILTRATE imagines a future completely saturated with technology, where post-human figures interact using rune-like symbols on immersive social media platforms. The film, directed by Mishka Kornai, was created in the public spaces of Montréal’s underground Metro transit system.

The actors in FILTRATE sport futuristic costumes made by Odette Mattha with shimmering tinsel, long strands of party beads, and textured fabrics that match the setting’s architectural details. Mattha’s designs take advantage of the unique feel of different areas of the Metro system: each station was created by a different architect. Though the filmmakers clearly used the spaces during off-peak times, we can only wonder at the surprise of an unsuspecting commuter.

In a statement on the film’s website, the creators explain their impetus for FILTRATE. “If people retreat into smaller and more idiosyncratic groups, what will the evolutionary trajectory of our society look like? As social groups diverge further and further over the course of generations, when does humanity cease to be just one species?”

The whole process took two years to complete, including 43 days of shooting, six months of costume building, and a year of post-production. Despite its high-tech feel, the creators share that FILTRATE was filmed using just an iPhone 7, a wheelchair, a monopod, and a hand stabilizer. You can take a look behind the scenes in an additional making-of video.

 

 



Art

Speedy PVC Pipe Sculptures

December 7, 2011

Christopher Jobson

These whimsical sculptures by Korean artist Kang Duck-Bong are made by adhering myriad cuts of PVC pipe and covering them in a thick shellac of urethane paint. The process creates an uncanny sense of motion, the figures appearing blurred and perpetually in motion. Kang’s work is on display at Gallery 4Walls in Seoul through December 23 as part of his solo show, Disguise. A huge thanks to Cho at Gallery 4Walls for providing the imagery for this post.

 

 



Design Science

Life Imitates Darkman and the 3D Skin Printer is Born

November 2, 2010

Christopher Jobson

OK so it doesn’t actually print the face of Liam Neeson (yet), but researchers at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine have successfully tested a bioprinter that outputs living skins cells directly onto burn wounds.

It acts just like your home printer, right down to the inkjet valve and vials of skin-cell “ink” that it sprays onto a wound. The printed skin graft consists of two separate layers — one is a mixture of skin cells with fibrinogen and Type I collagen (which each help with blood clotting and scar tissue formation, respectively); the second layer is thrombin, another clotting agent. The whole mixture has “a consistency similar to jello — so that [it] will adhere to the wound,” say the researchers.

Head over to FastCo for more.

 

 



Photography

Thomas Jackson Photographs Robots Doing Everyday Chores

October 28, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Any time I’m tagging a post with art, photography, and robots you know it’s gotta be good. Great photos from New York photographer Thomas Jackson. (via i like this blog, with a quick 5-question interview)