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Art Design

Man Spends 7 Years Drawing Incredibly Intricate Maze

January 31, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Almost 30 years ago a Japanese custodian sat in front of a large A1 size sheet of white paper, whipped out a pen and started drawing the beginnings of diabolically complex maze, each twist and turn springing spontaneously from his brain onto the paper without aid of a computer. The hobby would consume him as he drew in his spare time until its completion nearly 7 years later when the final labyrinth was rolled up and almost forgotten. Twitter user @Kya7y was recently going through some of her father’s old things (he’s still a custodian at a public university) when she happened upon the maze and snapped a few photos to share on Twitter. She was quickly inundated by requests from friends and eventually strangers who had endless questions, the most obvious being: are you making prints!? I’m not sure if prints will be made (I’ll definitely let you know if I hear anything), but it still boggles the mind simply looking at these few snapshots. (via spoon and tamago)

Update: Prints now available over in the Spoon & Tamago shop, just $40.

 

 



Art

A Drawing Machine that Records the Chaos of Pinball

November 28, 2012

Christopher Jobson

From the pendulum-based drawing machine by Eske Rex to the art of Tim Knowles who attaches writing implements to trees, I love when the seemingly random lines of chaos (or maybe just physics) are rendered visible using ink or pencil. This latest project titled STYN by Netherlands-based graduate student Sam van Doorn is no exception. Using modified parts from an old pinball machine van Doorn created a one-of-a-kind drawing device that utilizes standard flippers to control a ink-covered sphere that moves across a temporary poster placed on the game surface. He suggets that skill then becomes a factor, as the better you are at pinball the more complex the drawing becomes. See much more on his website, here. My drawing would have a single line that goes between the flippers and then have TILT written all over it. (via lustik)

 

 



Art

New Street Artist ‘Bored’ Turns Chicago Sidewalks into an Alternative Monopoly Game

July 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

I was walking in Chicago’s Logan Square neighborhood a few weekends ago when I happened upon an enormous stack of Monopoly ‘Chance’ cards made from plywood and bolted to the sidewalk announcing a marriage proposal at a nearby church. It was awesome. Immediately I started wondering if it was a genuine proposal? Was it a joke? Or could it be… ART?! Chicago has a fair amount street art if you know where to look, but it’s mostly spray painted stencils and paste-ups, and it’s extremely rare to see something three dimensional or sculptural.

As it turns out I wasn’t the first blogger to make the discovery. Nate Berg from the Atlantic found several sets of cards and actually went to the Armitage Baptist Church nearby to ask if they knew anything (they didn’t). He did figure out that the Monopoly pieces originally appeared back in April and several people on Reddit had a field day trying to piece the puzzle together. Everyone realized there were even more installations around the city, and not only that, the messages on the Chance and Community Chest cards were occasionally being painted over and replaced with other humorous and obscure messages.

After a few desperate tweets and some emailing, I finally got in touch with the artist (or artists!) known as Bored. The person (or group) chooses to remain anonymous but expressed via email their dissatisfaction at the lack of quality street art around Chicago. Saying specifically that “the goal of this entire project has been to present something different than a stencil painted on the ground or a poster pasted to a wall. Something 3-dimensional that can be picked up, beaten down, kicked, yanked, grabbed, and broken. And if someone ever put forth the effort to remove it, like a weed it will always grow back. And if left alone it will evolve into something different.”

While there are a number of good street artists in Chicago, this is definitely a welcome change of pace. I’m really excited to see this project evolve and hope they have more ideas brewing.

 

 



Craft

One Boy, a DIY Arcade, and the Most Uplifting Flashmob of All Time

April 10, 2012

Christopher Jobson

This is the story of a nine year old boy named Caine who built an elaborate cardboard arcade inside his father’s used auto part store. A dollar gets you four plays, and two dollars gets you a five-hundred turn FUN PASS. Business was slow until independent filmmaker Nirvan Mullick spotted the arcade and plotted to change Caine’s life forever. Watch the short film and if you feel as weepy and joyous as I did, head over to his newly established scholarship fund. And can I just say, what an amazing dad to support, encourage, and allow his son to pretty much overtake his storefront for the sake of fun and creativity. (via mefi)

 

 



Amazing

The World’s Largest Dodgeball Game

February 8, 2012

Christopher Jobson

For the third time in as many years the University of Alberta set a world record last week for the largest dodgeball game, pitting 4,979 ball-hurling competitors against one another in a chaotic, hour-long hailstorm of giant, spongy red balls. See many more photos taken by Gateway Photography. (via msnbc)

 

 



Craft

A 1,000 Piece Popsicle Stick Bomb

October 4, 2011

Christopher Jobson

So apparently popsicle stick bombs are a thing, and after this video I think they’re going to be a huge thing. I agree with a commenter on YouTube who asked what kind of kinetic dark magic is this!? If you want to make one yourself head on over to Instructables for a tutorial on how to make your own Cobra Weave Exploding Stick Bomb. (via neatorama)

 

 



Photography

The North Korean Mass Games Performed by 100,000 People

September 26, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Photographer Sam Gellman who is originally from Wisconsin has been living and working in Hong Kong for the past five years. He recently returned from a 4-day trip to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea where he was able to witness and photograph the Mass Games in Pyongyang. The Mass Games are a meticulously regimented display of gymnastics and other performing arts by nearly 100,000 participants, heavily laden with messages of state-sponsored propaganda. Perhaps the most incredible sight is that of the colorful backdrops consisting of thousands of perfectly placed children who sequentially flip through pieces of paper, creating staggering pictures of flags, horses, and slogans. Ten drunk sports fans with a team name written on their chests this is not. Gellman says via Flickr of the image above:

This shot was taken at the Mass Games, a propaganda-filled 100,000 person choreographed performance of simultaneous dancing and gymnastics on the field of Pyongyang’s May Day stadium. The image in the background of the horse is made up of 20,000 “pixels” which are constantly being changed into new images, each pixel by a different Korean kid. Each time they turn the page to create a new giant picture, they cry out, mixing the shout with the noise of thousands of pages turned at the same moment.

This display, and the forces at work behind it, equally fascinate and terrify me. If you want to see more, Gellman has published nearly 50 photos from his trip.