gifs

Posts tagged
with gifs



Art Photography

Absurd Animated Portraits by Romain Laurent

January 9, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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As a way to temporarily break free from a routine of personal and commercial projects, photographer Romain Laurent (previously) challenged himself to create a looped animated portrait each week since last September. He says the bizarre and often laugh-out-loud experiments are a low-pressure way to experiment and be creative without expectations. “As far as the intention of the series, it’s a way for me to explore a hybrid medium, experiment and being spontaneous while still sticking to a short weekly deadline. There isn’t a common concept between each loop, I just ‘go with the flow’ and see what comes to my mind each week.” You can see many more loops from the series over on his Tumblr. (via Lustik)

 

 



Animation Design

Hand Drawn Rotoscoping Gifs and Other Animation Experiments by Matthias Brown

December 26, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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I recently stumbled onto the Tumblr of animator Matthias Brown who shares his numerous experiments with rotoscoping and other animation techniques in quick looped gifs. In case you’re unfamiliar, rotoscoping is method where animators trace real footage frame by frame to create live-action animations with a hand drawn feel, a technique invented in 1915 by Max Fleischer who used it in his series Out of the Inkwell. While the technique is a century old it’s oddly refreshing to see it appear in today’s barrage of animated gifs, gritty imperfections and all. You can see much more of Brown’s work over on his aptly titled site TraceLoops, and he talks a bit more about his process here.

 

 



Art

Anonymous Art Collective 'RRRRRRROLL' Sets the World Spinning with New Gifs

December 2, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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It’s been well over a year since we last checked in with the anonymous art collective known as RRRRRRROLL (previously here and here) who create brief animated gifs of spinning objects or people. Although the aesthetic is somewhat rigid, with desaturated colors and only isolated objects set in motion, each new animation remains just as intriguing week after week. The group is made up of at least three individual photographers, a digital artist, and models, but have never publicly credited themselves, but you can now follow them on Twitter and Facebook.

 

 



Animation Art Design History

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope

October 17, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Nearly 155 years before CompuServe debuted the first animated gif in 1987, Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau unveiled an invention called the Phenakistoscope, a device that is largely considered to be the first mechanism for true animation. The simple gadget relied on the persistence of vision principle to display the illusion of images in motion. Via Juxtapoz:

The phenakistoscope used a spinning disc attached vertically to a handle. Arrayed around the disc’s center were a series of drawings showing phases of the animation, and cut through it were a series of equally spaced radial slits. The user would spin the disc and look through the moving slits at the disc’s reflection in a mirror. The scanning of the slits across the reflected images kept them from simply blurring together, so that the user would see a rapid succession of images that appeared to be a single moving picture.

Though Plateau is credited with inventing the device, there were numerous other mathematicians and physicists who were working on similar ideas around the same time, and even they were building on the works of Greek mathematician Euclid and Sir Isaac Newton who had also identified principles behind the phenakistoscope.
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Courtesy the Richard Balzer Collection

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The moving image was only viewable through a narrow slit. Via Wikimedia Commons

So what kinds of things did people want to see animated as they peered into these curious motion devices? Lions eating people. Women morphing into witches. And some other pretty wild and psychedelic imagery, not unlike animated gifs today. Included here is a random selection of some of the first animated images, several of which are courtesy The Richard Balzer Collection who has been painstakingly digitizing old phenakistoscopes over on their Tumblr. (via Juxtapoz, 2headedsnake, thanks Brian!)

 

 



Art

Bizarre New Animated Gifs from Zach Dougherty

October 15, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Digital artist Zach Dougherty (previously) is back with a new round if really strange animated gifs, placing his strange amorphous and glitchy objects against ordinary backdrops. Let’s file this under “I don’t know what it is but I like it.” (via Ignant)

 

 



Photography

More of the Best Nature GIFs on the Web

August 14, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Back in February we first explored an ongoing project called Head Like an Orange (previously) by a Netherlands-based artist named Marinus who isolates key segments of nature films, often just a split second in length, and uses the footage to create beautiful, whimsical, and strangely poetic gifs. These are a few of my favorites from the last several months but you can see much more right here.