glass

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Art

These 'Chiseled' Glass Wave Vessels by Graham Muir Appear Frozen in Motion

October 15, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Precariously resting atop a pedestal, these wave-like glass vessels by Scottish artist Graham Muir seem to defy gravity as if frozen in a moment before crashing into the ocean. Using techniques perfected over the last decade, Muir achieves delicate shapes that seem almost chiseled or fractured, but are in fact accomplished when working while the glass is still hot. He shares via his artist statement:

Such work speaks quietly of the harmony between maker or makers and the medium. It is often the result of a path that involves many failed attempts but results in a piece all the stronger for that, where nothing needs neither added nor taken away.

I find glass to be a material that does not respond well to being dominated by the artist. For me the concept of the work is just the starting point for a conversation between the artist’s idea and the material. The artist flags up the idea, the medium responds and the discussion begins. However the material must not dominate proceedings either and hot glass, as most who work in it know, can be very persuasive in having its own way.

Muir most recently had pieces on view as part of an exhibition of Scottish makers through Gallery TEN at Saatchi Gallery during Collect in London earlier this year. You can see more of his waves on his website. (via My Modern Met)

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Craft Design

The Mesmerizing Process of Making a Glass Chandelier from Scratch

September 24, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Walking into a hotel ballroom, say, and considering a gigantic glass chandelier suspended from the ceiling, you probably fall into one of two camps: “Wow, that chandelier is totally incredible.” OR “Wow, if that fell from the ceiling it would be totally incredible.” Regardless of which camp you fall into, you’ve probably never considered the process behind creating a genuine glass chandelier from raw materials. Lucky for us, the Science Channel went behind the scenes to film the elaborate glass-working process required to build the fanciest 150-pound lighting mechanism imaginable. Unfortunately this clip fails to credit the studio and artists shown on screen. Anyone know? (via Sploid)

Update: This is a peek inside the Baccarat crystal studio… because it’s written on their shirts. (thnx, Laurent for helping us read words)

 

 



Art

Books and Stones Embedded with Sleek Layers of Laminate Glass by Ramon Todo

September 9, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Splitting his time between Kanagawa, Japan and Dusseldorf, Germany, artist Ramon Todo (previously) is known for his small sculptures of rocks and books embedded with polished layers of glass. Todo’s decision to seamlessly introduce disparate materials into a single object creates an unusual intention, as if these objects have always existed this way. The random pieces of obsidian, fossils, volcanic basalt, and old books are suddenly redefined, or as Beautiful/Decay’s Genista Jurgens puts it: “By inserting something alien into these pieces, Todo is effectively rewriting their history, and the place that these objects hold in the world.”

Todo will have a number of new pieces on view with MA2 Gallery at EXPO CHICAGO starting next week. He also has a number of atworks available through Artsy and you can flip through additional glass books clicking the small arrows on MA2 Gallery’s website.

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Art Food

Glass Cross Sections of Fruit and Other Foods by Elliot Walker

August 26, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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London-based artist Elliot Walker uses molten glass to create a stunning variety sculptures including these arrangements of eating utensils, vessels, and cross sections of food. The stark outer surfaces of the surrounding objects contrasts with the vibrant interiors of the edible pieces, not unlike the effect of a cut geode. Walker currently has work at the Peter Layton Glass Blowing Studio as part of their current exhibition titled Essence that runs through the end of the week. You can see more photos of his work on Facebook.

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Design Science

Watch Molten Glass 3D-Printed From a Kiln at 1900 Degrees

August 26, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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In collaboration with the MIT Glass Lab, the Mediated Matter group at the MIT Media Lab has produced a way to 3D print glass, creating intricate patterns from molten glass inside a kiln-like printer and giving a completely modern twist to the 4,500 year-old material. The video produced to exhibit the ways in which the technology works displays the process without words, instead focusing on the mesmerizing way the hot glass stacks upon itself in the machine and ultimately cools into the final vase-like forms.

Glass 3D printing (or G3DP) is based on a dual-heated chamber concept, with the top chamber heating the glass and lower chamber slowly cooling it to prevent internal stresses. The top chamber operates at approximately 1900°F, and funnels the molten material through an alumina-zircon-silica nozzle into its programmable shapes.

The researchers explain the concept of the project as one that “synthesizes modern technologies, with age-old established glass tools and technologies producing novel glass structures with numerous potential applications.” One application of which is beautifully designed vessels created without human error, forms that are mathematically perfect in appearance and design.

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Caustic patterns of a 3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

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Caustic patterns of a 3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

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Glass 3D printing process. Photo: Steven Keating

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Glass 3D printing process. Photo: Steven Keating

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3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

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3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

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3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

 

 



Art

Broken Liquid: New Bodies of Water Sculpted from Layered Glass by Ben Young

July 22, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Glass artist Ben Young (previously here and here) just shared a glimpse of his latest sculptural works made from layers of cut laminate window panes. The bodies of water depicted in Young’s work are usually cut into cross-sections akin to textbook illustrations, creating translucent geometric islands that can appear both monolithic or chamsic.

“I hope viewers might imagine the work as something ‘living’ that creates the illusion of space, movement, depth and sense of spatial being,” Young says. “I like to play with the irony between the glass being a solid material and how I can form such natural and organic shapes.” The self-taught artist, furniture maker, and surfer has explored the properties of cut glass for over a decade at his Sydney studio. Here’s a bit more about his processes via Kirra Galleries:

Each of Young’s sculptural works are hand drawn, hand cut and handcrafted from clear sheet float glass made for windows, then laminated layer upon layer to create the final form. He constructs models, draws templates, makes custom jigs and then cuts the layers with a glazier’s hand-tool. The complexity comes from the planning phase, where he says “I do a lot of thinking before I even start to draw or cut.” He then sketches the concept by hand and creates a plan using traditional technical drawing techniques: “I work with 2D shapes and have to figure out how to translate that into a 3D finished piece. Sometimes my starting point changes dramatically as I have to find a way to layer the glass to create certain shapes.” The texture and colour of the glass varies in every piece according to its thickness and arrangement.

Young opens a new exhibition of work along with artist Peter Nilsson titled Float at Kirra Galleries this evening in Melbourne.

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