gradients

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Art

Meditative Faces Emerge from the Staggered Wooden Sticks Forming Artist Gil Bruvel's Sculptures

September 17, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Breathe” (2020). All images © Gil Bruvel, shared with permission

Gil Bruvel (previously) has spent 40 years practicing vipassanā meditation, an introspective practice that invites judgment-free observation of the mind. The Australia-born artist infuses the philosophies of this decades-long ritual into his variegated sculptures as he forms a series of faces in deep thought. With eyes and mouths closed, the figures project serenity and calmness, serving as “a reminder of what it looks like to be centered and at peace,” Bruvel says of The Mask Series.

Different in shape and size, the sticks are burned, painted with subtle gradients, and then held in place with wood glue, causing the figures to appear pixelated and as a disparate grouping of squares and rectangles when viewed up close. From a distance, however, “that fragmentation reveals a coherent whole: a face arises from apparent chaos,” Bruvel shares with Colossal. Through their collated forms, the assemblages offer a visual metaphor for the complexity and contradiction that’s inherent to human beings.

Bruvel also draws attention to the backs of the sculptures, which stray from the figurative depictions of the front to focus on the abstract workings of the mind.  “The assemblage of pixel-like stick-ends conveys the hidden realm of emotion, sensation, and thought—our internal universe. The gradients of color represent the flows of feeling and consciousness that pass through our minds like ripples on a lake, leaving the lake unchanged,” he says.

Explore more of Bruvel’s meditative artworks and see some works-in-progress on Instagram and Artsy.

 

“Floating” (2019), burnt wooden sticks and acrylic paint, 24 × 21 inches

“Mask #28” (2020), wood and paint, 16 × 16 × 9 inches

“The Fountain” (2019), wood and paint, 27 × 19 × 23 inches

“The Fountain” (2019), wood and paint, 27 × 19 × 23 inches

“Moonlight” (2019), wood and paint, 22 × 22 × 21 inches

“Moonlight” (2019), wood and paint, 22 × 22 × 21 inches

“Mask #22” (2020), wood and paint, 16 × 16 × 9 inches

“Mask #26” (2020), wood and paint, 16 × 16 × 9 inches

“Breathe” (2020)

 

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Art

Anonymous, Posed Figures by Artist Hanna Lee Joshi Explore the Female Body

August 24, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Untitled,” gouache and colored pencil, 15 x 20 inches. All images © Hanna Lee Joshi, shared with permission

The posed women in Hanna Lee Joshi’s latest series are comprised of vivid gradients: their chests are cobalt, shoulders rose, and palms lime. Created with gouache and colored pencil, the bright hues stray from flesh tones in favor of what Joshi terms “a more otherworldly aspect in my women. Reclaiming the goddess within and exploring the concept of embodying an ephemeral spirit in form,” she says. By rendering their enlarged, curved torsos and limbs in bold shades, Joshi subverts the tradition of the nude figure.

The Korean-Canadian artist, who’s based in Vancouver and recently was part of the group show “Somebody” at Hashimoto Contemporary, is concerned with how idiosyncratic experiences transcend the personal, which is why the subjects are all anonymous. Each work is, in part, a self-portrait that encompasses the physical, mental, and spiritual.

It is my way of coming to terms with being ok with taking up space; in society, in my day to day life. My pieces range from exploring a feeling of being contained within social constraints or self-created limitations to depicting the ceaseless chase for freedom. For me, it is a therapeutic reclaiming of how female bodies are depicted, little by little dismantling any internalized misogyny or any notion of how a woman should be or behave. It is a constant process where I am attempting to redefine how I see myself.

The unclothed figures also share messages with the positions of their elongated fingers and hands. Joshi depicts them with yogic mudras to embody “the beautifully poetic gestures that are so loaded with powerful symbolism,” she says.

To follow the artist’s introspective work, head to Instagram, and pick up a print in her shop.

 

“Sometimes we dance”

“Holding chaos within” gouache, color pencil on paper, 22 x 30 inches

“Untitled”

“Thousand petal lotus,” gouache and colored pencil, 12 x 12 inches

“Touching the earth,” gouache and colored pencil, 15 x 22 inches

 

 



Art

Wood Blocks Carved and Painted into Glimmering Gemlike Objects by Victoria Wagner

January 11, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Artist Victoria Wagner works with large pieces of reclaimed wood sliced into geometric forms and painted to resemble large gemstones. Titled Woodrocks, the cut facets of each piece are covered with delicate oil paint gradients that evoke mostly natural tones found in sunsets, water, or outdoor landscapes. The incongruous nature of wood and stone is something that fascinates Wagner. “There is something confusing to the senses in combinations that vacillate between interval and tone, allowing for optical engagement and a perceptual unpredictability,” she says. You can explore more of Wagner’s work on her website and on Instagram. (via Cross Connect, Supersonic)

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