humor

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Craft Design

Quirky New Felt Storybook Characters by ‘Cat Rabbit’

December 15, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Textile artist Cat Rabbit (previously) continues to produce a variety of croissant-headed spindly-legged felt creatures, all made by hand in her Melbourne studio. Many of the pieces seen here are special commissions, and several characters also make appearances in storybooks called Soft Stories, a collaboration with Isobel Knowles. You can see more Cat Rabbit goodness on Etsy and in her shop. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art Design History

Art Enamel Pins Inspired by the Masters

November 24, 2017

Christopher Jobson

The Pin Museum has a great selection of enamel pins featuring images lifted from iconic paintings and sculptures from Dali to Van Gogh. Their current lineup includes over a dozen different designs, all available in their online shop.

Update: Select Pin Museum styles are now available in the Colossal Shop.

 

 



Art Photography

Museum Patrons Accidentally Matching Artworks Photographed by Stefan Draschan

November 1, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Stefan Draschan visits museums around Europe to see not just the artwork but the people observing the artwork. In his series People Matching Artworks he patiently waits for museum-goers who unintentionally coordinate with the art they’re observing, and snaps a candid photo of the coincidence. You can follow the tumblr for this project, as well as a behind-the-scenes tumblr, and find links to Draschan’s other observational collections on his website. (via Kottke)

 

 



Photography

Photographer Introduces Himself to His Childhood Self in Series of Hilarious Photoshopped Images

October 13, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Montreal-based photographer Conor Nickerson was flipping through family photos when he wondered what it might look like to see his present self Photoshopped next to his childhood self, a version he only remembered through old photographs. After gathering clothing, hats, and shoes that would match his boyhood self, he spent several hours in Photoshop learning how to accurately match his image to the photo’s time period.

The series, Childhood, is described as “Myself hanging out with myself, c. 1997-2005,” and took Nickerson about 6 months to complete. You can find more of Nickerson’s work on his website and Facebook. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Craft Photography

New Paper Cutouts by ‘Paperboyo’ Turn Landmarks Across the Globe Into Scenes of Temporary Amusement

October 9, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

London-based photographer Rich McCor, or paperboyo (previously) travels across the globe giving creative updates to buildings, bridges, and signs through the use of simple paper cutouts. By placing a black design in the foreground of his image, London’s Tower Bridge is instantly transformed into a looping roller coaster, and a Canadian building miraculously appears like a lengthy accordion. Although many of McCor’s pictures engage with architectural elements, the paper artist also makes use of the natural environment as a creative backdrop for his paper works. Recently he published a book based on his cutout journeys, titled Around the World in Cut-Outs. You can see more of his photographic collages on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Hilarious Kinetic Eye Sculptures by Lucas Zanotto

October 3, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

EYES is a short film by Lucas Zanotto (previously) showcasing several kinetic sculptures both built and filmed by the Helsinki-based director. Each installation is composed of simple parts that subtly imitate an action associated with one’s eyes. In one piece, two transparent globes slowly leak streams of water onto the floor below. In another, two black balls swing back and forth above an open book, slowly scanning the pages below. You can watch more of Zanotto’s videos on his Instagram and Vimeo, and take a look at all nine of his optical installations in the short piece above. Sound design by David Kamp.

 

 



Design

Anatomical Fish Zip Bags by Japanese Designer Keiko Otsuhata

September 29, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Japanese designer Keiko Otsuhata has brought a new dimension to the popularity of fish as food by turning the sea creature into a functional-out-of-water zip bag. In Japan, fried fish (especially mackerel) is often seen on bar menus, and is prepared by splitting the fish through its stomach and frying it flat. The sight of fried fish is common visual vocabulary in Japan, but Otsuhata was curious about what the fish looked like in its pre-fried state, so she bought one from the grocery store, took photographs, and made it into a zip bag.

Tokyo-based Otsuhata is also a writer for the Japanese website Daily Portal Z, where she often shares her creative process as she explores pop culture and humor. You can see how she made the original fish bag, as well as a pair of pigeon shoes.

Three varieties of Otsuhata’s fish bags—kinme, saury, and sea bream—are available in The Colossal Shop.