ice

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History Photography

Defrosting a Building: Otherworldly Icescapes Inside a Historic Chicago Cold Storage Facility

January 16, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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For nine decades Fulton Market Cold Storage Company operated in Chicago’s meatpacking district with a full ten stories of freezing storage situated close to major railways. Last summer the company decided it was time to start fresh in a state-of-the-art facility outside of Chicago, so the building was sold to SRAM, a bike component manufacturer who will use the space for its global headquarters. Architects Perkins + Will were hired to help convert the ice-encrusted space into a new, modernized office building and were also tasked with the most epic refrigerator defrost in history. Luckily photographer Gary Jensen was asked to snap some incredible photos prior to the thawing which was actually caught on video (sorry no embed). See more photos on his website. (via gapers block)

Update: I’ve been asked to clarify that the building owner is technically Sterling Bay and the architect of the conversion is Hartshorne and Plunkard. SRAM is a potential tenant in the building and Perkins & Will is their architect.

 

 



Design

How to Build a Rainbow Igloo

January 5, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Thanks to an ingenious mother from Edmonton it’s quite possible nobody will every build a plain white igloo again. The adventure began with a kernel of an idea from Brigid Burton, whose daughter Kathleen Starrie and boyfriend Daniel Gray, an engineering student, were coming for a winter visit from New Zealand. Wanting to “keep him occupied” during the frigid winter days that often dip down to -25 °F (-31 °C), last October she began filling paper cartons with colored water and setting them outside to form translucent ice bricks. She hoped Gray’s engineering skills would do the rest. Like a total champ he accepted the challenge and with the help of additional family and neighbors the team spent nearly 150 hours fitting the 500 ice bricks into place. After completion the rainbow igloo was so visually striking the local news showed up to do a feature on it.

You can read the full story at the Global Edmonton and see many more construction photos here. Pretty sure Kathleen is basically required to marry this guy now. (via reddit)

 

 



Photography

The Stunning Glaciers and Icebergs of Greenland Photographed by Jan Erik Waider

December 21, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Nuremberg-based graphic designer and photographer Jan Erik Waider has traveled on numerous expeditions north to Greenland, Iceland, Scotland, and the Faroe Islands off Denmark where he shot these beautifully surreal landscapes of icebergs, glaciers and cliffs. I first stumbled onto his Icebergs in Fog series shot earlier this year in Ilulissat and Disko Bay in Greeland and then found his website where you can see all of these photographs in much higher resolution, really, go look, just incredible work. Despite the foreboding, harsh climate depicted in these photographs Waider seems to transform the landscapes into something strangely peaceful and idyllic. If you’re interested he has prints available on request and you can also follow him on Facebook. (via behance)

 

 



Photography Science

Frost Flowers Blooming in the Arctic Ocean are Found to be Teeming with Life

December 11, 2012

Christopher Jobson

These beautiful and other-worldly photographs of ice were taken last year by University of Washington graduate student Jeff Bowman and his professor Jody Deming while they worked on a study combining oceanography, microbiology, and planetary sciences in the central Arctic Ocean as part of the Integrated Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT) program. Their single focus was the study of frost flowers, a strange phenomenon where frost grows from imperfections in the surface ice amid extreme sub-zero temperatures nearing -22C or -7.6F, forming spiky structures that have been found to house microorganisms. In fact, the bacteria found in the frost flowers is much more dense than in the frozen water below it, meaning each flower is essentially a temporary ecosystem, not unlike a coral reef. Via IGERT:

Around their research icebreaker in the central Arctic Ocean new ice grows on long open cracks that network amongst the thick floes of pack ice. Abruptly the surface of this new ice changes texture. The cold, moist air above the open cracks becomes saturated and frost begins to form wherever an imperfection can be found on the ice surface. From these nucleation points the flower-like frost structures grow vertically, quickly rising to centimeters in height. The hollow tendrils of these “frost flowers” begin to wick moisture from the ice surface, incorporating salt, marine bacteria, and other substances as they grow. The fog dissipates and the Arctic sun lights the surface of the frost flowers, initiating a cascade of chemical reactions. These reactions can produce formaldehyde, deplete ozone, and actually alter the chemical composition of the lower atmosphere. […] Bowman and Deming have discovered that bacteria are consistently more abundant in frost flowers than in sea ice. Since microscopic pockets in sea ice are known to support an active community of psychrophiles (cold-loving microorganisms), even in the coldest months of the year, these results are encouraging.

Bowman and Deming are currently building an ultra-clean chamber where they can grow artificial frost flowers and hope that their research leads to a better understanding of how life might be able to survive in extreme conditions elsewhere in the universe. Amazing! Photos by Matthias Wietz. (via the daily what)

 

 



Photography

Remarkable Macro Photographs of Ice Structures and Snowflakes

December 5, 2012

Christopher Jobson

We’re all familiar with the most common shapes of ice: snow flakes, icicles, snowmen, cookie dough ice cream. But break out the macro lens and suddenly we’re in unfamiliar territory as ice branches out, curls in on itself, and grows in shapes that look more like the delicate leaves of ferns than solid cold water. Russian photographer Andrew Osokin has done a phenomenal job of capturing such bizarre ice formations, you can explore hundreds more photos over in his LensArt profile. (via the curious brain)

 

 



Photography

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Snowflakes by Matthias Lenke

February 9, 2012

Christopher Jobson

German photographer Matthias Lenke captured these wonderful macro shots of individual snowflakes yesterday. See more over on Flickr.

 

 



History Photography

Ice Mask

October 22, 2011

Christopher Jobson

The Australasian Antarctic Expedition team explored Antarctica from 1911 through 1914, studying geology, meteorology, and mapping unknown lands. Here, a photograph by Frank Hurley shows the team meteorologist C.T. Madigan with an incredibly thick ice mask after a day of weathering the elements. Here’s another more extreme example. The photo is from the National Library of Australia Commons which recently made several hundred historical images available online.