insects

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with insects



Craft

Ornate Insect Embroideries by Humayrah Bint Altaf Incorporate Antique Materials and Metallic Beads

January 12, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Embroidery artist Humayrah Bint Altaf stitches fabulously ornate insects and trees that incorporate antique gold twist cord, hundreds of metallic beads, Rococo threads, and other delicate materials. The end results are scarab beetles that could practically crawl off the canvas and honey bees prepared to take flight.

“I often wander through the woods near my home, where I gather leaves, twigs, feathers and other things I can find to bring back home and preserve,” says Bedford-based Altaf. “I also like to incorporate nature’s treasures into my embroideries and with each piece I feel that a part of me has been embedded into my work.”

With a background in fashion design, Altaf had the opportunity to study at the Royal School of Needlework that helped launch her career in embroidery. She now sells original works through an online shop and shares much of her process on Instagram. (via The Creators Project)

 

 



Design

DIY Paper Beetle Sculpture Kits by Assembli

December 28, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Designer Joop Bource of Netherlands-based Assembli just released this colorful trio of DIY beetle models. The flat-pack model kits are available in three different beetle species including stag, hercules, and atlas, each in a number of different metallic colors. (via Lustik)

Update: Assembli beetle kits are now available in the Colossal Shop.

 

 



Art Design

Artist Aki Inomata Provides Bagworms with Snippets of High Fashion to Create Matching Cocoons

November 3, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Commenting on female consumer culture in Japan, artist Aki Inomata decided to dress female bagworms in extravagant attire, handing clippings of women’s dresses to the insects in order to transform them into protective cases. In nature, male bagworms shed these cases when they become moths. Females however, remain in these cases their entire lives, waiting patiently for the attention of a male. Reminded of the similarities to her own gender performance in Japan, Inomata exhibited her work with female bagworms at a department store that sells women’s clothing, her own commentary on what lengths women must still go to in order to be aesthetically accepted by society.

This is not the only time Inomata has worked with bugs or animals to alter their interpretation of the world. From 2009-2016 she crafted shells for hermit crabs based on differently global cities, and in 2009 she took French lessons with a parakeet. Inomata is represented by Maho Kubota Gallery in Tokyo and you can see more of her work on her website.

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Photography Science

The Extraordinary Details of Tiny Creatures Captured with a Laser-Scanning Microscope by Igor Siwanowicz

October 12, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Acilius diving beetle male front tarsus (foot) 100x

If you’ve ever wondered how a diving beetle swims through the water or manages to rest just on the surface, the answer is in part because its foot is infinitely more complicated than your own. As seen above, this microscopic image of a male Acilius sulcatus (diving beetle) by photographer Igor Siwanowicz reveals the extraordinary complexity of this aquatic insect’s tiny appendage. This is just one of many examples of Siwanowicz’s work as a neurobiologist at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Farm Research Campus. His brilliantly colored images show the tree-like structures of moth antennas, the wild details of barnacle legs, and the otherworldly shapes of plant spores. The photos are made with a confocal laser-scanning microscope capable of “seeing” vast amounts of detail beyond what you might capture with a traditional lens-based microscope. You can see much more of his nature photography here. (via Synaptic Stimuli, Wired)

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Barnacle

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Midge Pupa

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Paraphyses & Sporangia

Isopod appendage

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Front leg of whirligig beetle

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Moth antennae

Moth antennae, detail

 

 



Art

Hybrid Kinetic Insects Carved from Wood by Dedy Shofianto

August 9, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Mechanical Horn Centaur Beetle, 2015. 100 x 100 x 150 cm. Jati Wood, Pine Wood, Electric Dynamo.

Indonesian artist Dedy Shofianto creates unusual kinetic sculptures of insect-like creatures by carving almost every component from wood. Though powered by hidden electronics it’s the exquisitely detailed mandibles, wings, antennae, and gears of these hybrid creatures crafted from locally sourced jati (teak) wood that take center stage. It would seem that a lifetime of wood craftsmanship would have been brought to bear on each piece, all the more impressive considering Shofianto created these pieces when he was only 24 years old while still in school—he graduated from the Art Institute of Indonesia just last year. You can see more of his kinetic works at Redbase Contemporary Art.

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Evolution, 2015. 120 x 100 x 144 cm. Jati Wood, Pine Wood, Electric Dynamo, Ultrasound System.

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Nyanyian Kumbang Tanduk, 2015. 100 x 80 x 150 cm. Jati Wood, Electric Motor, Ultrasonic Sensor.

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Seeking Identity, 2015. 70 x 50 x 125 cm. Jati Wood, Gamelina Wood.

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Photo © Tirana House.

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Photo © Tirana House.

 

 



Art Craft

Amazing Balloon Sculptures of Animals and Insects by Masayoshi Matsumoto

August 1, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Forget your run-of-the-mill cutesy balloon dogs and crowns twisted at kids birthday parties, Japanese artist Masayoshi Matsumoto (previously) elevates the inflated craft of balloon animals to an entirely different level. The Japanese artist uses a multitude of balloon colors and shapes to sculpt creatures you might not normally associate with the children’s party activity including insects, giant isopods, baboons, and scaly lizards. You can see more of his latest works in this gallery.

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Art

Imaginary Currency Leaf Insects and Other Fictional Bugs Painted by Takumi Kama

July 22, 2016

Johnny Waldman

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To avoid becoming prey, leaf insects use mimicry to blend into their surroundings. But in Takumi Kama’s imagined future, when the insect’s natural environment has been completely destroyed, these masters of camouflage will have no choice but to move in with those who took away their home.

Animals and insects are no stranger in the work of Japanese painter Takumi Kama, who recreates them in acrylics with astonishing accuracy and realism. For a recent exhibition at BAMI gallery in Kyoto, Kama came up with 2 different, imaginary leaf insects that camouflage themselves in the city. One is the Hide-mushi, which gets its name from Hideo Noguchi, who appears on the 1000 yen bill (mushi means insect). The Hide-mushi camouflages itself amongst Japanese currency and feeds on paper, which can affect its color.

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Then there is the Comi-mushi, which camouflages itself amongst comic books and comic strips. It can often be spotted in bookstores, convenience stores but have also been known to come out on days when garbage trucks pick up paper for recycling.

Kama has painted these imaginary insects with such realism that it can be hard to tell if they’re 2 or 3-dimensional. But rest assured, no currency has been defaced in the name of art. Everything from the insects to the specimen boxes have been painted on canvas. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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