installation art

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Art

Enormous Panels of Patchworked Fabric Give Colorful Temporary Makeovers to Public Buildings

September 13, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Textile artist Amanda Browder collaborates with the communities she’s working in to built site-specific architectural interventions. Using hundreds of yards of donated fabric with bright colors and patterns, Browder and her volunteer teams stitch together enormous panels that resemble crazy quilts. The panels wrap around bell towers, sheath elevated walkways, and drape from gables and eaves to give passersby a new experience of familiar buildings. In a statement on her website, Browder describes her work:

A state of betweenness – ‘twixt soft sculpture /’tween orchestrated public object installation with a studio affinity for abstraction and minimalism”. I am in love with the transformative nature of materials, and how the combination of the familiar creates abstract relationships about place. This relational objectivity generates an open-ended narrative, ambiguous situations defined by the choice of materials and work ethic. Central to the psychedelic experience, I am drawn to reinventing Pop-Art colors by exploring shifts in scale and sculptural perceptions.

The Montana-born artist received a B.A. in studio arts as well as two master’s degrees in sculpture and installation art. Browder is now based in Brooklyn and frequently travels to create new work. She was recently awarded an opportunity with the prestigious ArtPrize organization in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The multi-part work, titled Kaleidoscopic, is currently on view at locations around Grand Rapids. Keep up with Browder’s projects on Instagram, and watch the video below for a time-lapse of a previous installation in Las Vegas and an interview with the artist.

Photo: Bryan Esler

Photo: Bryan Esler

 

 



Art

Swirling Vortexes and Ghostly Humans Emerge From Hand-Painted Transparent Sheets by David Spriggs

July 21, 2019

Andrew LaSane

“Gravity” (2018), East Bund-Mingsheng Art Wharf, Shanghai, China, All images via David Spriggs

Vancouver-based artist David Spriggs creates large-scale 3D installations by by layering hand-painted transparencies within custom frameworks. The massive sculptural installations pull viewers in and shift based on perspective, while exploring themes of space-time, movement, surveillance, power dynamics, and other complex conceptual ideas.

For his larger installations, Spriggs tells Colossal that he creates and works from abstract topographical maps that are based on perfect geometric shapes. “I often use the golden ratio to determine placement and shape of a form. Axis of Power for example is based on a perfect golden spiral and the placement of the eye of the storm located at the golden ratio of the installation at 1.618. The artwork Gravity also is based on the golden spiral with all the marks following this spiral in a perfect hemisphere.” Spriggs also builds smaller models and digital maquettes to prepare for certain larger works.

Spriggs’ installations have grown significantly over the past 20 years. “I have always been aware of how scale can influence the viewer,” he shares. “Many of my artworks on the subject of power are large to create a certain power relationship and/or have a perceptual impact with the viewer. Scale has often been used throughout art history to promote and affirm concepts and power…Almost always the concept dictates the size of one of my artworks. A work like ‘Gold’ for example would have quite a different meaning and impact if it was a small piece.”

To see more of his installations, follow David Spriggs on Instagram.

“Gold” (2017), Woodstreet Art Galleries, Pittsburgh and Arsenal Montreal

“Gravity” (detail)

“Gravity” (detail)

“Regisole” (2015), Arsenal Montreal

“Regisole” (detail)

“Axis of Power” (2015) Sharjah Art Museum, United Arab Emirates

“Axis of Power” (detail)

“In Utero II” (2019)

“In Utero II” (detail)

 

 



Art

Textural Installations by Shoplifter Immerse Visitors in Furry Neon Caves

June 7, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Icelandic artist Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir, who goes by Shoplifter, cites her primary medium as hair. But rather than working with the expected range of browns and blondes that naturally grow on humans and animals, Shoplifter uses a range of hair that seems to draw its color palette from Muppets. Neon yellows and pinks, deep blues, and vivid greens commingle in massive installations that coat gallery walls, floors, and ceilings. Shoplifter’s immersive works often create cave-like spaces where visitors explore around, under, and through her textural worlds.

Shoplifter, whose moniker stems from a stranger’s mishearing of her given name, cites themes of vanity, self-image, fashion, beauty and popular myth as inspiration for her work. In an interview with artnet, she shared, “It started out with my fascination with humans and the things we mass produce for obscure reasons. Hair extensions are trying to beautify yourself and be unique. I noticed that layering the hair together and having it flow around created a very painterly tapestry feeling.”

Shoplifter exhibits widely and most recently showcased her work as Iceland’s representative to the  the Venice Biennale. Her solo show Nervescape VIII is also on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma in Helsinki, Finland through September 15, 2019. Explore more of Shoplifter’s work on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art

Miniature Scenes by Slinkachu Comment on Consumer Culture

June 4, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“The Youseum”

For the last 13 years, guerrilla miniaturist Slinkachu (previously) has been creating barely noticeable scenes to be discovered by unsuspecting passersby. The London-based artist uses tiny model people whose minuscule size creates humorous and thought-provoking scenarios. Slinkachu often comments on current events and social dynamics in his work. An installation at the Museum of Fine Arts in Ghent features a purse placed nonchalantly on a gallery bench, which turns out to be a meta-gallery. Inside the purse, small figures admire glorified tokens of consumer consumer culture like framed credit cards and lipstick sculptures.

Slinkachu’s work is on view through June 22, 2019 in a two-person show with Jaune at Thinkspace in Culver City, California. You can see more from Slinkachu on Instagram, where the artist often shares videos that help contextualize the scale of his installations.

“The Youseum,” detail

“Deserted”

“Branded (USA Male)”

“Shelter”

“Shelter,” detail

“Tug of War”

“Leisure Facilities For Youths”

“Life Support”

“Stuck on You”

Collaboration with Super A

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Happy Halloween! A little tragedy left in the Mohave desert last week 🌵🔪

A post shared by Slinkachu (@slinkachu_official) on

 

 



Art

Murmuration: 10,000 Porcelain Birds Create a Calligraphic Landscape at the National Gallery of Victoria

May 24, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

All images courtesy of National Gallery of Victoria

As part of a new large-scale exhibit at Australia’s National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang (previously) has created a swarm of 10,000 porcelain birds, titled Murmuration (Landscape). The multi-part winter exhibition at the museum combines Cai’s contemporary work with the display of a selection of China’s famed ancient terracotta warriors. Cai, who is best known for his enormous artworks that utilize fireworks, assembled the vast quantity of birds and smudged them black with gunpowder. The installation fills an entire gallery and the birds are suspended to create a 3D impression of a calligraphic drawing of Mount Li, where the tomb of the ancient warriors was located. Terracotta Warriors and Cai Guo-Qiang opens to the public today and is on view through October 13, 2019. Watch a time-lapse of the labor-intensive installation here and explore more of the artist’s diverse works on Instagram.

Photo: Tobias Titz

 

 



Art

Building Bridges: Six Sets of Reaching Arms Clasp Hands Over a Venice Waterway

May 16, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Photograph: David M. Benett

In 2017, one of the most talked-about works seen during the Venice Biennale was Lorenzo Quinn’s Support, which was not an official part of the iconic art fair. The sculptural installation of hands emerged from Venice’s waterways and appeared to hold up an old building. His follow-up piece to Support, which has been installed with backing from London-based Halcyon Gallery, is again not officially associated with the Biennale. Constructed with white resin, Building Bridges features six sets of reaching arms with hands clasped over a waterway, meant to represent people and cultures coming together over differences.

In an interview with the Associated Press, Quinn explained, “Humanity has never grown by creating barriers. It always grows when it opens up its borders and it welcomes new cultures. Venice is a testament to that… It has been a driving force of European growth always.” The location of the towering white appendages at a former shipyard provided viewers with multiple vantage points, and at night Building Bridges was illuminated from below. A photo gallery on Quinn’s website shows the artist at work on his large-scale sculptures, and you can follow along with his new projects on Instagram.

Rendering by Halcyon Art International

 

 



Art

A Fleeting Dandelion Wish Processing Facility Appears For Two Days Outside of Los Angeles

May 16, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Photo: Michèle M Waite, courtesy the Art Department

A recent two-day installation in Commerce, California afforded visitors an opportunity to evaluate and deposit their secret wishes. Dandelions, which was organized by the anonymous artist group The Art Department, took place in an administrative building at the Laguna Bell electrical substation from May 11-12, 2019. The cavernous space was transformed into a secret wish processing facility, where visitors submitted their wishes for questioning and analysis before receiving a dandelion to send their wish in a whoosh down a chute of either slam dunks or long shots. Writer Renée Reizman, who had a chance to visit the fleeting facility, explains the guided performance art in depth on Hyperallergic. Explore more of The Art Department’s previous projects on their website and Instagram.

Photo: Renée Reizman for Hyperallergic

Photo: Michèle M Waite, courtesy the Art Department

Photo: Renée Reizman for Hyperallergic

Photo: Michèle M Waite, courtesy the Art Department

Photo: Renée Reizman for Hyperallergic

Photo: Michèle M Waite, courtesy the Art Department

Photo: Michèle M Waite, courtesy the Art Department

Photo: Michèle M Waite, courtesy the Art Department