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Art

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls

July 25, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) building case (studio view), 1980-2000. Material: Gold, pearls, turquoise. Length: 2.5 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

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Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away.

After first learning about caddisflies, self-taught (and self-professed amateur) artist Hubert Duprat had a thought. Had a caddisfly ever naturally encountered a fleck of gold in a river and used it to build a home? And then one step further: what if a caddisfly had only gold and other precious stones or jewels to work with?

Trichoptères, French for the scientific name of the caddisfly, is Duprat’s answer to that question. For years the artist has been collaborating with the tiny insects, providing them small aquariums of gold, turquoise and pearls that the the larvae readily use to construct their temporary homes. Regardless of how creepy crawly you might find the insects, it’s impossible to deny the strange beauty of the final product, tiny gold sculptures held together with silk. Encountering them void of any context, one would assume they were constructed by a jeweler.

Duprat currently has a solo exhibition at the Museum of Old and New Art in Tasmania which runs through July 28th, and it should be noticed that is work with caddisflies is only one small aspect of his art practice.

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Trichoptera larva with case, 1980-2000. Material: gold and pearls. Dimension: 0.5 x 1.9 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

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Trichoptera larva with case, 1980-2000. Material: gold and pearls. Dimension: 0.5 x 1.9 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) case. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) case on pedestal. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) case. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) case on pedestal. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) case. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) case on pedestal. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

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A huge thank you to the Museum of Old and New Art and photographer Fabrice Gousset for providing the images for this post. If you liked this, don’t miss the work of (via ARTREBELS)

 

 



Art

Beautiful Fordite Stones Created from Layers of Automotive Paint are a By-Product of Old Car Factories

May 22, 2014

Johnny Waldman

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image via talyer jewelry

Old car factories had a harmful impact on the environment, releasing toxic chemicals into the air, land and water. But it wasn’t all ugly. Oddly enough, one of the by-products of car production was Fordite, also known as Detroit agate. The colorful layered objects take their name from agate stones for their visual resemblance. But instead of forming from microscopically crystallized silica over millions of years, Fordite was formed from layers of paint over several tens of years. Back in the day, old automobile paint would drip onto the metal racks that transported cars through the paint shop and into the oven. The paint was hardened to a rock-like state thanks to high heats from the baking process. As the urban legend goes, plant workers would take pieces home in their lunch pails as a souvenir for their wife or kids.

Since then, car production has modernized and Fordite has been rendered a relic of the past. Artisans have been using the colorful material for jewelry but it’s not a stretch to imagine a future when these pieces sit behind glass in a museum. The colors can also be used to judge how old they are because car paint was subject to different trends. In the 1940s cars were mostly black or brown enamel while the 1960s ushered in an age of colorful lacquers. (via My Modern Met, Fordite.com)

Update: The Michigan State University Museum confirms they have a fordite sculpture in their collection.

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image via flickr user m e sweeney

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image via flickr user nebbie

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image via flickr user m e sweeney

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image via flickr user Sue Kershaw

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image via Fordite.com

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image via flickr user Sue Kershaw

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image via flickr user Sue Kershaw

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image via Fordite.com

 

 



Design Photography

Vintage Camera Lens Bracelets by SDPNT

July 12, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Stefaan duPont over at SDPNT is making some wonderful one-of-a-kind cuffs from old camera lenses. Every bracelet is completely unique and can’t be duplicated. The store opened for the first time about two hours ago, so check it out. (via notcot)

 

 



Design

Waveform Necklaces and Bracelets Designed from a Recording of Your Voice

June 7, 2012

Christopher Jobson




The Waveform Necklace by Berlin-based designer David Bizer is created from a digital audio recording of a voice or song. Bizer offers the jewelry in a wide range of materials including silver and wood and also offers a tutorial on how you can do it yourself. (via laughing squid)

 

 



Animation Design

Kinetic Rings Mimic the Flight of Birds

February 27, 2012

Christopher Jobson



Kansas-based metalsmith and jeweler Dukno Yoon creates rings, bracelets, and other devices that mimic the movements of birds by harnessing the motion caused by the flick of the wrist or flexing of fingers. Yoon received his BFA from Kookmin University, Seoul and a MFA from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio and most recently has been working on a series of metronomes that also explore the movement of birds. Though I was only able to embed a few of the animated examples of his work above, head over to his Wings gallery to see many more devices in action, the bracelets in particular are really fun to watch. If you like the kinetic nature of these pieces also check out the work of Gary Schott.

The animated GIFs above are pretty large and might take a moment to load if you’re on a slower connection. We’ll see how the bandwidth does for this post and I’ll do my best to keep them up.