kinetic sculpture

Posts tagged
with kinetic sculpture



Art Design

Delightful Characters Spring to Life in Hand-Cranked Wooden Automata by Kazuaki Harada

May 12, 2021

Grace Ebert

Japanese woodworker Kazuaki Harada (previously) has spent the last few years designing these playful automata that activate with a simple hand-crank. Watch miners work in tandem, a figure cackle with unparalleled enthusiasm, and the devil aggressively play the fiddle, and make sure to turn your volume up, too—Harada often pairs an audio component with the mechanical movements for an additional dose of whimsy. For more of his quirky designs, which include many of the character-based works shown here in addition to more elaborate, abstract pieces, check out his Instagram and YouTube.

 

 

 



Art

Kinetic Flowers Grow from a Deteriorated Landscape in an Otherworldly Installation by Casey Curran

March 26, 2021

Grace Ebert

In Parable of Gravity, artist Casey Curran (previously) assembles a vast garden of delicate kinetic blossoms amidst an expanse of deterioration. The sweeping landscape, which is on view at Seattle’s MadArt through April 17, positions Curran’s pulsing plant forms atop 20 towers of wooden scaffolding that line the gallery space. Coated in a thick layer of mud, the tallest structures scale eight feet at the outer edge of the installation, where a human-like figure appears to hover in the air. The anonymous body is covered in the flowers, which are made from laser-cut polyester drawing papers and powered by cranks and small motors.

Through the maze of garden plots at the other end of the space hangs a hollow, aluminum asteroid—which is modeled after 951 Gaspra, the first rocky mass humans were able to observe in detail thanks to a 1991 viewing by the Galileo spacecraft. Titled “Anchor of Janus,” the imposing sculpture references both the Roman god and the intricate motifs on Gothic cathedrals and provides a foreboding, catastrophic lens to the otherwise burgeoning garden.

In a statement, Curran explains the confluence of the manufactured and organic themes:

This mythological, architectural, and astronomical convergence considers not only the scientific and spiritual aspects of our connection to the natural world, but also our cultural legacy and the ways in which past technological advancements continue to impact our lives and experiences today. Further, the reference to Janus recognizes the dual nature of human progress, with all of the positive and negative implications it carries.

Watch the video above to watch the installation take shape, and follow Curran on Instagram and Vimeo to stay up-to-date with his latest projects.

 

Full installation view: “Kinetic Towers” and “Anchor of Janus,” Dur-alar, MDF, aluminum, dirt, paper, and glue. Photo by James Harnois. All images © Casey Curran, shared with permission

“We Spoke Like This to Remember.” Photo by Adrian Garcia Rodriguez 

Detail of “Anchor of Janus.” Photo by James Harnois

Full installation view: “Kinetic Towers” and “Anchor of Janus,” Dur-alar, MDF, aluminum, dirt, paper, and glue. Photo by James Harnois

Detail of “We Spoke Like This to Remember”

“Kinetic Towers” and “We Spoke Like This to Remember.” Photo by James Harnois

Photo by James Harnois

Visitors walking through the kinetic towers. Photo by Adrian Garcia Rodriguez

Curran installs “We Spoke Like This to Remember”

 

 



Art

Dizzying Kinetic Sculptures by Anthony Howe Billow and Writhe in the Wind

December 7, 2020

Grace Ebert

Washington-based artist Anthony Howe (previously) has mesmerized viewers for nearly a decade with towering kinetic sculptures that twist and turn with hypnotic motion. Weighing hundreds of pounds, the hefty artworks are activated with even the slightest breeze and resemble otherworldly organisms, four-legged creatures, and mechanisms as they coil in the wind. Howe documents his fabrication process for one of his works in a new video on his YouTube channel, where he shares a growing collection of sleek sculptures.

 

“Mums the Word,” 475 pounds, 206 x 96 x 60 inches

“In Cloud Light IV,” 830 pounds, 234 x 86 x 60 inches

 

 



Design

Four Adorable Prairie Dogs Peek Out of Kinetic Sculpture Constructed with LEGO

June 1, 2020

Grace Ebert

Designers Jason and Kristal Allemann, of JK Brickworks (previously), understand that prairie dogs have a tendency to scramble into their burrows at first sight of a threat, so the two LEGO enthusiasts have designed a kinetic sculpture that captures the rodents’ most endearing actions while above ground. The articulate animals are shown popping out of their holes, checking for predators in the distance, and wagging their black-tipped tails on a grassy platform constructed with the iconic building blocks.

The duo shares full parts lists and instructions for how to create the animals and their burrow on YouTube. Keep up with their dynamic projects on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art

A Kinetic Sculpture by Felipe Pantone Slides into a Hypnotizing Kaleidoscope of Color

May 21, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Subtractive Variability Manipulable 3” (2020), UV paint, PMMA, MDF, and linear slide bearings, 21.5 x 50.0 x 7.2 centimeters. All images © Felipe Pantone

Argentinian-Spanish artist Felipe Pantone makes the relationship between color theory and human action tangible. His latest kinetic sculpture, titled “Subtractive Variability Manipulable 3,” features three translucent slides that shift to create hypnotic gradients. In cyan, magenta, and yellow, each piece visualizes the variances of subtracted color when affected by human touch.

In a statement, Panton said he “evokes a spirit in his work that feels like a collision between an analog past and a digitized future, where human beings and machines will inevitably glitch alongside one another in a prism of neon gradients, geometric shapes, optical patterns, and jagged grids.” Many of his colorful works appear pixelated in the physical form of a mural or sculpture.

A limited-edition run of the artist’s kaleidoscopic sculpture will be released by Configurable on May 26. To see more of his vivid projects, head to Instagram. (via Street Art News)

 

 

 



Art Design

Undulating Kinetic Sculpture by Julia Nizamutdinova Mimics Intertwined Infinity Signs

March 3, 2020

Grace Ebert

Artist and designer Julia Nizamutdinova has created a kinetic sculpture that rotates, twists, and turns in a mesmerizing and hypnotic fashion. Made of plastic, aluminum, and steel, INFI is modeled after the infinity sign in its form and movement, constantly crisscrossing and repeating. When illuminated with an LED light, the edges stand out against the sculpture’s fish-shaped body, and the rhythmic, undulating movements become more clear.

Nizamutdinova tells Colossal that her creation is part of a larger project she calls Cyberflora. “They contain a meditative therapeutic effect from the contemplation of smooth hypnotic movements and the beauty of futuristic forms,” she writes. To see more of Nizamutdinova’s work that falls at the intersection of technology, art, and design, head to YouTube and Instagram.