kinetic sculpture

Posts tagged
with kinetic sculpture



Design

A Perpetual Sisyphus Kinetic Sculpture Built with Lego

December 3, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Jason Allemann of JK Brickworks designed this superb perpetual kinetic sculpture depicting the Greek myth of Sisyphus who was condemned to roll an immense boulder up a hill for eternity. In the video below he explains how the device works in detail, and for the more engineering-minded you can download a building guide and parts list from his website. (via The Automata Blog)

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Art Design

Enigma: A Steampunk-Themed Cafe Filled with Kinetic Sculptures Opens in Romania

October 20, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Welp, now we’ve seen everything. Just last week, a new cafe opened in Romania called Enigma that claims to be “the world’s first kinetic steampunk bar.” We have no way to verify if that’s true, but it certainly looks impressive from these photos, if you’re into that sort of thing. A slightly terrifying humanoid robot with a plasma lamp cranium bicycles by the door, and a variety of kinetic artworks churn and rotate on both the ceiling and walls. Watch the video to take a peek inside, and if you’re in town you can visit Enigma Cafe at Enigma at Iuliu Maniu, Nr 12, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. Photos by Zoly Zelenyak from The 6th-Sense Interiors. (via Steampunk Tendencies)

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Art Design

An Elegant Kinetic Sculpture by Derek Hugger that Mimics the Flight of a Hummingbird

October 12, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Containing over 400 precisely machined gears, screws, and aesthetic elements, Derek Hugger’s latest kinetic sculpture Colibri mimics the motion of a hummingbird in flight. Though the motions of flying are unmistakable, the piece has much more in common with a clock than a bird. He shares about the piece:

Every element of motion has been completely mechanized, from the beating wings to the flaring tail. Intricate systems of linkages and cams bring the sculpture to life with a continuous flow of meticulously timed articulations. As each mechanism has been linked to the next, Colibri cycles through its complete range of motions by the simple turn of a crank. This project took me roughly 700 hours and contains about 400 parts.

You can see many more of his moving artworks on his website, and in a refreshingly rare move he also sells detailed instructions of how to make them in his shop. (via The Automata Blog)

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Art

These self-propelled kinetic wood sculptures by David C. Roy can spin for nearly a day

September 14, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Since graduating in 1974 from Boston University with a degree in physics, artist David C. Roy has been fascinated by the motion and mechanics of kinetic sculptures. Roy is a self-taught woodworker who designs limited edition wall-mounted sculptures powered by various mechanical wind-up mechanisms without the aid of electricity. Each piece can run for about 5-18 hours unassisted on a single wind, with his latest piece Dimensions capable of whirling around for a whopping 40+ hours. From his Connecticut studio Roy has produced over 150 one-of-a-kind designs over the last thirty years, many of which he currently sells as editions through his website. He’s also gone to great lengths to film many of his sculptures which you can watch on his Youtube channel. (via Booooooom)

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Art Design

A Hypnotic Infinite Model Train Loop that Travels Rapidly in Either Direction

August 19, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Model train enthusiast James Risner decided to turn several toy locomotive sets into a contemporary kinetic art installation of sorts by creating an infinite loop. The seven linked trains can travel forward or backward at surprisingly quick speed, creating a hypnotic spiral of of motion. I wonder if this could be scaled to a Metropolis II level? (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Art Design

Bruce Shapiro’s Mesmerizing Kinetic Sand Drawing Machines

June 3, 2015

Christopher Jobson

In a 21st century take on the traditional Zen sand garden, artist Bruce Shapiro invented the Sisyphus Machine, an elaborate kinetic drawing machine that uses magnets to drag rolling steel marbles through a thin layer of sand to create complicated mandala-like patterns. Shapiro, who was once a practicing physician, has spent the better part of 25 years experimenting with computerized motion control and many of his Sisyphus Machines have been installed in locations around the world including a large device in Switzerland back in 2003 and at Questacon in Canberra, Australia in 2013. It appears the artist is currently working on a tabletop consumer version and if you’re interested you can sign up for his mailing list here. (via Core77, Fast Company)

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Art Design

Shylights: Beautiful Unfolding Kinetic Lights That Bloom like Flowers

March 16, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Several types of flowers are known to open and close for reasons of defense or energy conservation. This evolutionary mechanism, called nyctinasty, inspired Studio DRIFT to design the Shylight, a kinetic light fixture that opens dramatically during a 30 foot (9 meter) fall. The motion mimics the same action of a blooming flower or the billowing of a parachute. A collection of Shylights were just permanently installed at Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, and you can see them in action in the video above. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)