kinetic sculpture

Posts tagged
with kinetic sculpture



Art

Kinetic Rain: 1,216 Computationally Controlled Bronze Raindrops at Changi Airport in Singapore

July 4, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Berlin firm ART+COM just completed this stunning new kinetic sculpture in Terminal 1 of Changi Airport in Singapore. Kinetic Rain consists of two sets of 608 suspended raindrops made from lightweight aluminum covered in copper which are raised and lowered in a 15-minute computationally designed choreography controlled from motors embedded in the ceiling. ART+COM created a similar though somewhat smaller piece for the BMW Museum in 2008.

 

 



Art

The Page Turner: A New Rube Goldberg Machine from Joseph Herscher

January 9, 2012

Christopher Jobson

The Page Turner is the latest device from New York born, New Zealand raised, and Brooklyn-based kinetic artist Joseph Herscher who builds elaborate Rube Goldberg machines that use complex chain reactions to complete mundane tasks. Some of Herscher’s effects here are subtle in their brilliance. He often creates small loops where his devices refer back to earlier steps, for instance the final state of step 25 is also used again as part of step 30. You can see more videos of his ingenious work here. (via automata, junk culture)

 

 



Art

A Wooden Automata by Levi van Veluw

January 4, 2012

Christopher Jobson

I’ve always enjoyed the work of Netherlands-based artist Levi van Veluw, and this wonderful new Automata is no exception. The piece is made almost entirely of wood and is powered by 100 gears embedded in the base. (via faith is torment)

 

 



Craft Documentary

Wonder Object: Playful Mechanized Objects by Gary Schott

November 3, 2011

Christopher Jobson

I was unexpectedly delighted by this documentary short on jeweler, artist, and metalsmith Gary Schott who creates these small kinetic sculptures that produce tiny, intimate gestures. The attention to detail in each piece is astounding, from the early detailed sketches and balsa wood models, to the selection of materials, and even the color of fabric—all to create a tiny device, the sole purpose of which is to gently evoke a smile, to express, in the words of the artist, an action of love. The wonderfully produced video was shot and edited by husband and wife filmmakers Mark and Angela Walley of Walley Films out of San Antonio, Texas. (via junk culture)

 

 



Art

Fantastic Kinetic Sculptures by Limee Young

August 22, 2011

Christopher Jobson

South Korean artist Limee Young makes these diabolically complex kinetic sculptures using stainless steel components, embedded cpu boards, microprocessors, servos, and other mechanical doodads I’m not going to even pretend to understand. The devices seem to have no practical function other than being completely mesmerizing in a strangely perfect way. You can read a bit more about the devices on his blog and see a couple larger images on mu-um.

 

 



Art

A Helium-filled Kinetic Drawing Sculpture by Karina Smigla-Bobinski

August 16, 2011

Christopher Jobson

ADA – Analog Interactive Installation, is a kinetic sculpture by German-based artist Karina Smigla-Bobinski. The installation is made form an enormous helium-inflated sphere trapped inside a small room that’s spiked with dozens of protruding charcoal pieces which scrape the edges of the gallery wall as participants push, toss, and otherwise manipulate it. Most recently it was on display at the Electronic Language International Festival in São Paulo this Summer that took place in São Paulo. It’s fascinating to me that given the constraints of the sphere and room, a single outcome (pictured at bottom) is destined to emerge, but yet requires the participation of dozens if not hundreds of gallery visitors. Reminds me of the work of Roman Ondák. (via we make money not art, photos courtesy we make money not art, s.antonio, and the artist)

 

 



Craft

Kinetic Sculptures by Mihai Bonciu

June 28, 2011

Christopher Jobson

I love that these wiry automata by Mihai Bonciu require complex components to make such simple actions. They also seem so incredibly delicate, like winding them the wrong way could cause the entire contraption to collapse. More please!